enterprise application development versus traditional software development

Discussion in 'Java' started by jrefactors@hotmail.com, Jan 15, 2005.

  1. Guest

    I try to compare enterprise application development with traditional
    software development. Looks like the major difference is that
    enterprise application development has deployment phase, but not in
    other applications such as desktop applications.

    please advise. thanks
    , Jan 15, 2005
    #1
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  2. Phlip Guest

    jrefactors wrote:

    > I try to compare enterprise application development with traditional
    > software development. Looks like the major difference is that
    > enterprise application development has deployment phase, but not in
    > other applications such as desktop applications.


    Where are you getting this stuff?

    "Enterprise" development is a big sexy word for "in-house" development.
    Compared to "shrinkwrap", you can cheat on a few issues.

    The pipeline to your customers is much shorter. You typically don't need to
    find a way to make them pay for your software. In return, you give them
    _exactly_ what they ask for, not what your marketing department tells you
    might sell.

    Because the pipeline is shorter, you can take many shortcuts. You might need
    to build full-featured installers, or localize to many languages, or adapt
    to many different kinds of databases. Because so many technology decisions
    are already made, you can save time hard-coding links to specific databases
    and other "enterprise" applications. None of these links must be
    "productized", or made optional.

    These forces allow you to focus on giving specific customers exactly what
    they need. That's why "enterprise" is lucrative if you do it right, like
    Thoughtworks does. And it can be lucrative if you do it "wrong", too. The
    right way is to deploy teams to enterprises to help customize the computers
    at the centers of their businesses. The "wrong" way is to build One True
    Program that can configure and tweak and deploy to any possible enterprise.

    That kind of program is typically very lucrative to tune and configure for a
    very long time, but not very lucrative to its clients.

    --
    Phlip
    http://industrialxp.org/community/bin/view/Main/TestFirstUserInterfaces
    Phlip, Jan 15, 2005
    #2
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  3. Alan Gauld Guest

    On 14 Jan 2005 21:37:59 -0800, wrote:
    > I try to compare enterprise application development with traditional
    > software development. Looks like the major difference is that
    > enterprise application development has deployment phase, but not in
    > other applications such as desktop applications.


    Enterprise class geneally refers to large scale. The applications
    might not be significantly different to other business type apps
    but they have to cater for very large volumes of users(10000
    plus) in many geographic locations (often including many counties
    and time zones), they will be running 24x7x365 often with
    reliability in excess of 99.99% so full high availability,
    failover and recovery need to be built in. Also security may be
    an issue.

    In addition Enterprise apps usually have to integrate with lots
    of existing applications, so there will likely be lots of
    middleware technology involved, and the database may well be a
    single corporate entity so you are restricted in the schema you
    can use. Sumilarly printing may be done by a print factory or
    external publishing house rather than traditional printers
    (lasers etc).

    As you mention Enterprise projects typically cover the end to end
    lifecycle so in addition to developing the software itself you
    need to provide deployment (and probably training and support)
    The need to rollback a release and be able to operate several
    versions of the software concurrently are also quite common.
    Also hardware specs and even dedicated network designs may be
    needed.

    I think those are the key characteristics of enterprise as I saee
    them. Others no doubt will have other factors to consider.

    Alan G.

    Author of the Learn to Program website
    http://www.freenetpages.co.uk/hp/alan.gauld
    Alan Gauld, Jan 15, 2005
    #3
  4. "Phlip" <> writes:

    > jrefactors wrote:
    >
    > > I try to compare enterprise application development with traditional
    > > software development. Looks like the major difference is that
    > > enterprise application development has deployment phase, but not in
    > > other applications such as desktop applications.

    >
    > Where are you getting this stuff?
    >
    > "Enterprise" development is a big sexy word for "in-house" development.
    > Compared to "shrinkwrap", you can cheat on a few issues.


    Since he mentioned a deployment phase, I'd assume he's talking about
    Enterprise Java development, which is basically development of a
    system under the J2EE architecture where the system will be run under
    an application server such as Websphere, JBoss or WebLogic.

    The term "enterprise application" is basically used for large
    back-office business applications - accounting systems, directory
    management systems, order tracking systems and similar. It does not
    have any particular connotations of the system having been developed
    in house, nor that it's created for one particular customer only.

    --
    Leif Roar Moldskred
    Never turn your back on a gabbleduck.
    Leif Roar Moldskred, Jan 15, 2005
    #4
  5. "Phlip" <> wrote in message
    news:Th2Gd.17418$...
    > jrefactors wrote:
    >
    >> I try to compare enterprise application development with traditional
    >> software development. Looks like the major difference is that
    >> enterprise application development has deployment phase, but not in
    >> other applications such as desktop applications.

    >
    > Where are you getting this stuff?


    School?

    I don't think your answer is going to impress his teacher ;)


    Shayne Wissler
    http://www.thoughtsonsoftware.com
    Shayne Wissler, Jan 15, 2005
    #5
  6. H. S. Lahman Guest

    Re: enterprise application development versus traditional softwaredevelopment

    Responding to Jrefactors...

    > I try to compare enterprise application development with traditional
    > software development. Looks like the major difference is that
    > enterprise application development has deployment phase, but not in
    > other applications such as desktop applications.


    I agree with Phlip that it is mostly a marketing buzzword with very
    little information value.

    Nonetheless, as Gauld points out, there are certain vague implications
    associated with it. Generally the term implies large architectures and
    infrastructures for supporting individual applications. It also implies
    reuse of software content at various scales. In IT, that primarily
    means shared data storage and associated middleware facilities. But
    good luck on finding an substantive definitions of what that might mean
    in practice.

    I don't think deployment has much to do with it. Deployment is a major
    hassle for large applications and infrastructures. But is it also part
    of development of small, individual applications. IOW, the only thing
    that is changing is the scale of the aggravation.


    *************
    There is nothing wrong with me that could
    not be cured by a capful of Drano.

    H. S. Lahman

    Pathfinder Solutions -- Put MDA to Work
    http://www.pathfindermda.com
    blog (under constr): http://pathfinderpeople.blogs.com/hslahman
    (888)-OOA-PATH
    H. S. Lahman, Jan 15, 2005
    #6
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