FAQ Topic - What is a built-in object? (2010-06-02)

Discussion in 'Javascript' started by FAQ server, Jun 2, 2010.

  1. FAQ server

    FAQ server Guest

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    FAQ Topic - What is a built-in object?
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    A built-in object is any object supplied by an ECMAScript
    implementation, independent of the host environment, that is present
    at the start of the execution of an ECMAScript program.

    ECMA-262 3rd Edition defines the following built-in objects:

    *
    Objects
    _global_, Math

    Constructors
    Object, Function, Array, String, Boolean, Number, Date, RegExp

    Errors
    Error, Date, EvalError, RangeError, ReferenceError, SyntaxError, TypeError, URIError

    Functions
    eval, parseInt, parseFloat, isNaN, isFinite, decodeURI,
    decodeURIComponent, encodeURI, encodeURIComponent

    ECMA-262 Edition 5 defines also the built-in object ` JSON `.

    Nonstandard built-in objects may include ` RuntimeObject `,
    ` String.prototype.link `, ` CollectGarbage `, and more.


    The complete comp.lang.javascript FAQ is at
    http://jibbering.com/faq/

    --

    The sendings of these daily posts are proficiently hosted
    by http://www.pair.com.
     
    FAQ server, Jun 2, 2010
    #1
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  2. FAQ server

    Joe Nine Guest

    FAQ server wrote:
    > -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    > FAQ Topic



    I'll tell you what I'd like to see in the FAQ - a glossary of terms
    often used in conjunction with JavaScript and on this newsgroup.

    For example, I have no idea why jQuery is so named. I see people saying
    query engine but it seems to have nothing at all to do with database
    queries (e.g. SQL Query). Also, QSA is often mentioned but there's never
    a mention of what it is. I also see the term selector used a lot on the
    board and don't know what that means in JavaScript terms. Some simple
    examples of a query, a QSA and a selector would be good.
     
    Joe Nine, Jun 2, 2010
    #2
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  3. Joe Nine wrote:

    > I'll tell you what I'd like to see in the FAQ - a glossary of terms
    > often used in conjunction with JavaScript and on this newsgroup.
    >
    > For example, I have no idea why jQuery is so named.


    It's supposed to be a library that uses "queries" to the document tree, and
    its author is *J*ohn Resig.

    > I see people saying query engine but it seems to have nothing at all to do
    > with database queries (e.g. SQL Query).


    Retrieving only certain element object references from a document tree can
    be understood as being a query, too. The meaning of "query" is not limited
    to databases to begin with.

    > Also, QSA is often mentioned but there's never a mention of what it is.


    It is expected that you read a newsgroup for a while before asking
    questions. However, it is probably a good idea to explain the most commonly
    used terms (as long as it does not attempt to impose a pseudo-language as
    with the term "javascript").

    > I also see the term selector used a lot on the board


    This is not a (bulletin) board.

    > and don't know what that means in JavaScript terms.


    It means the same as in CSS: a means to select something from a greater
    something else. With document.querySelectorAll(), it means *exactly* the
    same thing as in CSS. (RTFM)

    > Some simple examples of a query, a QSA and a selector would be good.


    A FAQ is not supposed to be a tutorial. There are already tutorials
    elsewhere, and the FAQ refers to them.


    PointedEars
    --
    Danny Goodman's books are out of date and teach practices that are
    positively harmful for cross-browser scripting.
    -- Richard Cornford, cljs, <cife6q$253$1$> (2004)
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Jun 2, 2010
    #3
  4. FAQ server

    Joe Nine Guest

    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
    > Joe Nine wrote:
    >
    >> I'll tell you what I'd like to see in the FAQ - a glossary of terms
    >> often used in conjunction with JavaScript and on this newsgroup.
    >>
    >> For example, I have no idea why jQuery is so named.

    >
    > It's supposed to be a library that uses "queries" to the document tree, and
    > its author is *J*ohn Resig.
    >
    >> I see people saying query engine but it seems to have nothing at all to do
    >> with database queries (e.g. SQL Query).

    >
    > Retrieving only certain element object references from a document tree can
    > be understood as being a query, too. The meaning of "query" is not limited
    > to databases to begin with.
    >
    >> Also, QSA is often mentioned but there's never a mention of what it is.

    >
    > It is expected that you read a newsgroup for a while before asking
    > questions. However, it is probably a good idea to explain the most commonly
    > used terms (as long as it does not attempt to impose a pseudo-language as
    > with the term "javascript").
    >
    >> I also see the term selector used a lot on the board

    >
    > This is not a (bulletin) board.
    >
    >> and don't know what that means in JavaScript terms.

    >
    > It means the same as in CSS: a means to select something from a greater
    > something else. With document.querySelectorAll(), it means *exactly* the
    > same thing as in CSS. (RTFM)
    >
    >> Some simple examples of a query, a QSA and a selector would be good.

    >
    > A FAQ is not supposed to be a tutorial. There are already tutorials
    > elsewhere, and the FAQ refers to them.
    >
    >
    > PointedEars


    Thanks for all the info above. Since I posted my question here I've also
    been reading up on queries and selectors. Also read up on *J*, he's
    quite a query himself. Why someone would take an elegant language like
    JavaScript and want to mangle it into the jQuery syntax is beyond my
    understanding. Looking at jQuery examples it looks horrible. Not
    surprising though with his liking of Perl.
     
    Joe Nine, Jun 2, 2010
    #4
  5. Joe Nine wrote:

    > Thanks for all the info above.


    You're welcome. Thanks in advance for trimming your quotes to the relevant
    minimum next time.

    > Since I posted my question here I've also been reading up on queries and
    > selectors. Also read up on *J*, he's quite a query himself. Why someone
    > would take an elegant language like JavaScript and want to mangle it into
    > the jQuery syntax is beyond my understanding. Looking at jQuery examples
    > it looks horrible. Not surprising though with his liking of Perl.


    Full ACK. Join the club :)


    Regards,

    PointedEars
    --
    Danny Goodman's books are out of date and teach practices that are
    positively harmful for cross-browser scripting.
    -- Richard Cornford, cljs, <cife6q$253$1$> (2004)
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Jun 2, 2010
    #5
  6. FAQ server

    Scott Sauyet Guest

    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
    > Joe Nine wrote:
    >> For example, I have no idea why jQuery is so named.

    >
    > It's supposed to be a library that uses "queries" to the document tree, and
    > its author is *J*ohn Resig.


    Is that documented somewhere? I always assumed that the "j" was for
    "Javascript". Of course with the tendency in Java circles to prepend
    anything with "J", the name doesn't seem particularly surprising, even
    in Javascript.

    --
    Scott
     
    Scott Sauyet, Jun 2, 2010
    #6
  7. Scott Sauyet wrote:

    > Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn wrote:
    >> Joe Nine wrote:
    >>> For example, I have no idea why jQuery is so named.

    >> It's supposed to be a library that uses "queries" to the document tree,
    >> and its author is *J*ohn Resig.

    >
    > Is that documented somewhere?


    I do not know, it is just what came first to my mind. Sorry if it sounded
    authoritative. (I think there is no argument about "query".)

    > I always assumed that the "j" was for "Javascript". Of course with the
    > tendency in Java circles to prepend anything with "J", the name doesn't
    > seem particularly surprising, even in Javascript.


    You may be right. On the other hand, John Resig's net name is "ejohn",
    "jresig" at Mozilla, and "jeresig" on Twitter (just googled), which would
    fit the starting lowercase letter better than "Javascript".


    PointedEars
    --
    Anyone who slaps a 'this page is best viewed with Browser X' label on
    a Web page appears to be yearning for the bad old days, before the Web,
    when you had very little chance of reading a document written on another
    computer, another word processor, or another network. -- Tim Berners-Lee
     
    Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn, Jun 2, 2010
    #7
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