Good hardware design code re-use strategies, reference book

Discussion in 'VHDL' started by wallge, Jan 23, 2007.

  1. wallge

    wallge Guest

    I am the main hardware designer for the company I work for. I inherited
    a lot of old, badly written, poorly documented
    VHDL designs and vendor tool project files. Over the course of the time
    that I have worked here, I have been trying to take care to go back and
    document things and better organize them, to make them easier to use
    and reuse, along with trying to write well-documented, reusable new
    code.

    I don't have any training as a software engineer or code "maintainer"
    (I'm an EE). I was wondering if there was a good
    resource out there (maybe a website or book on amazon) that would clue
    me into some good code writing and maintenance strategies that I
    wouldn't have learned in school. I know that there are a lot of
    software engineering resources available, but it would be nice if there
    was something more specific to hardware design (HDL Code) reuse and
    maintenance.

    thanks
     
    wallge, Jan 23, 2007
    #1
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  2. wallge wrote:
    > I am the main hardware designer for the company I work for. I inherited
    > a lot of old, badly written, poorly documented
    > VHDL designs and vendor tool project files. Over the course of the time
    > that I have worked here, I have been trying to take care to go back and
    > document things and better organize them, to make them easier to use
    > and reuse, along with trying to write well-documented, reusable new
    > code.
    >
    > I don't have any training as a software engineer or code "maintainer"
    > (I'm an EE). I was wondering if there was a good
    > resource out there (maybe a website or book on amazon) that would clue
    > me into some good code writing and maintenance strategies that I
    > wouldn't have learned in school. I know that there are a lot of
    > software engineering resources available, but it would be nice if there
    > was something more specific to hardware design (HDL Code) reuse and
    > maintenance.
    >
    > thanks


    Take a look at the "Reuse Methodology Manual" by Keating and Bricaud.

    http://tinyurl.com/3atmd3

    or

    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_g...=reuse methodology manual&Go.x=0&Go.y=0&Go=Go

    Regards,

    John McCaskill
    www.fastertechnology.com
     
    John McCaskill, Jan 23, 2007
    #2
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  3. wallge wrote:
    > I am the main hardware designer for the company I work for. I inherited
    > a lot of old, badly written, poorly documented
    > VHDL designs and vendor tool project files. Over the course of the time
    > that I have worked here, I have been trying to take care to go back and
    > document things and better organize them, to make them easier to use
    > and reuse, along with trying to write well-documented, reusable new
    > code.


    I organize source files as vhdl-mode projects.
    It's free, see:
    http://www.iis.ee.ethz.ch/~zimmi/emacs/vhdl-mode.html


    -- Mike Treseler
     
    Mike Treseler, Jan 23, 2007
    #3
  4. wallge

    Guest

    In comp.arch.fpga wallge <> wrote:
    >I am the main hardware designer for the company I work for. I inherited
    >a lot of old, badly written, poorly documented
    >VHDL designs and vendor tool project files. Over the course of the time
    >that I have worked here, I have been trying to take care to go back and
    >document things and better organize them, to make them easier to use
    >and reuse, along with trying to write well-documented, reusable new
    >code.


    >I don't have any training as a software engineer or code "maintainer"
    >(I'm an EE). I was wondering if there was a good
    >resource out there (maybe a website or book on amazon) that would clue
    >me into some good code writing and maintenance strategies that I
    >wouldn't have learned in school. I know that there are a lot of
    >software engineering resources available, but it would be nice if there
    >was something more specific to hardware design (HDL Code) reuse and
    >maintenance.


    Use a good version control system.
    (Test it before accepting it. Make sure all relevant systems can handle it)

    Use one source code management system if possible.

    Decide on benefit/cost on clearing up various sources.
    (Could start with just describing what it does in general)
     
    , Jan 24, 2007
    #4
  5. John McCaskill posted on 23 Jan 2007 09:51:58 -0800:

    "Take a look at the "Reuse Methodology Manual" by Keating and Bricaud."

    I have read only a tiny proportion of this book. Which parts could
    actually teach someone something useful, if the reader does not
    already understand the importance of the points (e.g. I do not think
    that I would count "Use Functions" and "Use Loops and Arrays" from
    Chapter 5 as being in this category)?

    Regards,
    Colin Paul Gloster
     
    Colin Paul Gloster, Jan 24, 2007
    #5
  6. wallge

    Bill Mills Guest

    On Jan 24, 4:49 am, wrote:
    > In comp.arch.fpga wallge <> wrote:
    >
    > >I am the main hardware designer for the company I work for. I inherited
    > >a lot of old, badly written, poorly documented
    > >VHDL designs and vendor tool project files. Over the course of the time
    > >that I have worked here, I have been trying to take care to go back and
    > >document things and better organize them, to make them easier to use
    > >and reuse, along with trying to write well-documented, reusable new
    > >code.
    > >I don't have any training as a software engineer or code "maintainer"
    > >(I'm an EE). I was wondering if there was a good
    > >resource out there (maybe a website or book on amazon) that would clue
    > >me into some good code writing and maintenance strategies that I
    > >wouldn't have learned in school. I know that there are a lot of
    > >software engineering resources available, but it would be nice if there
    > >was something more specific to hardware design (HDL Code) reuse and
    > >maintenance.Use a good version control system.

    > (Test it before accepting it. Make sure all relevant systems can handle it)
    >
    > Use one source code management system if possible.


    Look at revision control tools with a "bug tracking" feature.

    >
    > Decide on benefit/cost on clearing up various sources.
    > (Could start with just describing what it does in general)
     
    Bill Mills, Jan 24, 2007
    #6
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