keeping asp.net pages warm

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by laimis, Jul 18, 2005.

  1. laimis

    laimis Guest

    Hello,

    has anyone succesfully used an approach that I read somewhere suggesting
    that after deploying asp.net application, one can create a windows
    service or scheduled task that requests for asp.net page from that
    application so that it is compiled at all times? This is to avoid long
    waiting time when the user hits the site for the first time.

    I am about to write a small util that accomplishes the task. I was just
    wondering how effective it can be in the production environment...
    laimis, Jul 18, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. laimis

    Brock Allen Guest

    Much of the wait time you experience is not the first-time compilation, but
    the AppDomain being loaded. You can keep the AppDomain loaded in the same
    manner as you suggest, but the tendancy is to unload the AppDomain if it's
    not being used; you may have other apps running on the server that might
    like those resources. The behavior of shutting down the Application if it's
    not being used is more common in Windows 2003 where (by default) if the app
    is idle for 20 minutes it's shutdown. This can be configured in the AppPool
    settings in IIS under W2K3.

    -Brock
    DevelopMentor
    http://staff.develop.com/ballen



    > Hello,
    >
    > has anyone succesfully used an approach that I read somewhere
    > suggesting that after deploying asp.net application, one can create a
    > windows service or scheduled task that requests for asp.net page from
    > that application so that it is compiled at all times? This is to avoid
    > long waiting time when the user hits the site for the first time.
    >
    > I am about to write a small util that accomplishes the task. I was
    > just wondering how effective it can be in the production
    > environment...
    >
    Brock Allen, Jul 18, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. laimis

    laimis Guest

    Interesting ...

    I got the idea from reading the following article:
    http://www.aspnetresources.com/articles/debug_code_in_production.aspx

    which has one of the last sections titled "Keep The Code Warm". I
    thought, as the author and the white paper suggests, the utility might
    be useful. I guess not. Basically what you are saying there is more to
    gain by allowing the resources to be freed, than to make sure that the
    application stays alive. I guess it depends if any other sites are
    hosted and services running.

    Well, in any case, thanks for reminding that the delay is also due to
    loading the assemblies into app domain.

    Brock Allen wrote:
    > Much of the wait time you experience is not the first-time compilation,
    > but the AppDomain being loaded. You can keep the AppDomain loaded in the
    > same manner as you suggest, but the tendancy is to unload the AppDomain
    > if it's not being used; you may have other apps running on the server
    > that might like those resources. The behavior of shutting down the
    > Application if it's not being used is more common in Windows 2003 where
    > (by default) if the app is idle for 20 minutes it's shutdown. This can
    > be configured in the AppPool settings in IIS under W2K3.
    >
    > -Brock
    > DevelopMentor
    > http://staff.develop.com/ballen
    >
    >
    >
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> has anyone succesfully used an approach that I read somewhere
    >> suggesting that after deploying asp.net application, one can create a
    >> windows service or scheduled task that requests for asp.net page from
    >> that application so that it is compiled at all times? This is to avoid
    >> long waiting time when the user hits the site for the first time.
    >>
    >> I am about to write a small util that accomplishes the task. I was
    >> just wondering how effective it can be in the production
    >> environment...
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    laimis, Jul 18, 2005
    #3
  4. laimis

    Brock Allen Guest

    > Basically what you are saying there is more to
    > gain by allowing the resources to be freed, than to make sure that the
    > application stays alive. I guess it depends if any other sites are
    > hosted and services running.


    Bingo -- as always, it depends :)

    -Brock
    DevelopMentor
    http://staff.develop.com/ballen
    Brock Allen, Jul 18, 2005
    #4
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Manish
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    629
    Steve C. Orr [MVP, MCSD]
    Nov 17, 2003
  2. Adrian
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    2,133
    Kevin Spencer
    Feb 24, 2004
  3. Arsen V.

    IIS Warm Up Period

    Arsen V., May 5, 2004, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    2,360
    Arsen V.
    May 10, 2004
  4. NiTiN

    very warm hello to ALL

    NiTiN, Oct 29, 2007, in forum: Java
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    329
    Hunter Gratzner
    Oct 29, 2007
  5. Replies:
    0
    Views:
    314
Loading...

Share This Page