Looking for open source project maintainer

Discussion in 'Java' started by Ulli Horlacher, Sep 16, 2011.

  1. F*IX is a java applet client for F*EX, a web based software for personal
    based file transfer of ANY size:

    http://fex.rus.uni-stuttgart.de/
    http://freshmeat.net/projects/fffex/

    F*IX and F*EX are GPL open source.

    The current F*IX maintainer has no more time for this project and so I am
    looking for a successor.

    The tasks are:

    Receive bug reports and make bug fixes (eg "window is too small" or "error
    message is incomprehensible"). This happens about once a month or so.

    Optional is implementation of new features like chunk-mode for HTTP proxy.

    F*IX has currently 70 kB source code including comments.

    You will get an account on fex.rus.uni-stuttgart.de with virtually
    unlimited disk space, and glory and honour :)

    --
    Ullrich Horlacher Informationssysteme und Serverbetrieb
    Rechenzentrum E-Mail: -stuttgart.de
    Universitaet Stuttgart Tel: ++49-711-685-65868
    Allmandring 30 Fax: ++49-711-682357
    70550 Stuttgart (Germany) WWW: http://www.rus.uni-stuttgart.de/
     
    Ulli Horlacher, Sep 16, 2011
    #1
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  2. Ulli Horlacher

    Tom Anderson Guest

    On Fri, 16 Sep 2011, Ulli Horlacher wrote:

    > F*IX is a java applet client for F*EX, a web based software for personal
    > based file transfer of ANY size:
    >
    > http://fex.rus.uni-stuttgart.de/
    > http://freshmeat.net/projects/fffex/


    In your "You have the following possibilities" section, you don't mention
    BitTorrent. I don't know if you've heard of it, but it's a popular way to
    exchange files. I'll run through the talking points you list in that
    section ...

    BitTorrent can handle large datasets - the second-largest known dataset is
    the complete archive of Geocities, weighing in at 641.32 gigabytes:

    http://thepiratebay.org/torrent/5923737/Geocities_-_The_Torrent

    It's as quick as any direct connection method, and quicker than F*EX,
    because (assuming i have understood F*EX correctly), that requires the
    uploader to finish uploading before the downloader begins downloading, so
    the elapsed time is at least the sum of their best transfer times, whereas
    BitTorrent finishes in the maximum of their best transfer times.

    BitTorrent does not involve knowing any ancient scripts.

    BitTorrent does not require passwords, or allowing a correspondent access
    to your machine.

    BitTorrent does not do any sort of auto-deletion. But since you are
    transferring directly between users' machines, this is not necessary.

    BitTorrent does not do encryption, but files can be encrypted before
    transfer if they are sensitive.

    Many BitTorrent clients allow you to monitor the transfer to a peer, and
    to see when it is complete.

    BitTorrent is portable across all popular consumer operating systems, and
    unix. The protocol is publicly documented, and there are multiple actively
    maintained open-source implementations of all the software needed.

    You do need at least one of the users' machines to be able to accept
    incoming connections from the internet. This is usually easy enough to
    arrange. If not, then it is possible to set up a third machine somewhere
    else which can accept such connections, and have it also join the swarm,
    and act as a relay. Unlike with FTP etc, it can begin transferring data to
    the downloader as soon as it has received one complete chunk from the
    uploader.

    In addition to the transfer software, you need a tracker. There are many
    publicly available trackers. It is also straightforward to run a tracker
    of your own, using XBT, or one built into your client of choice.

    The main problem with BitTorrent is probably that the documentation around
    using it in this way is poor, and the field is littered with poor
    implementations of clients. There are good implementations, but it may not
    be immediately obvious which they are (for future reference: rtorrent is
    good).

    So, if you are having trouble finding a maintainer for your software,
    perhaps you should consider switching to BitTorrent.

    tom

    --
    I was eventually persuaded of the need to design programming notations
    so as to maximize the number of errors which cannot be made, or if made,
    can be reliably detected at compile time. Perhaps this would make the
    text of programs longer. Never mind! Wouldnt you be delighted if your
    Fairy Godmother offered to wave her wand over your program to remove
    all its errors and only made the condition that you should write out
    and key in your whole program three times! -- C. A. R. Hoare
     
    Tom Anderson, Sep 16, 2011
    #2
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  3. Ulli Horlacher

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Fri, 16 Sep 2011 19:42:32 +0100, Tom Anderson
    <> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who
    said :

    >BitTorrent can handle large datasets - the second-largest known dataset is
    >the complete archive of Geocities, weighing in at 641.32 gigabytes:


    See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/bittorrent.html for even more detail,
    especially how to install it.

    Another possibility for distributing files is The Replicator. See
    http://mindprod.com/webstart/replicator.html

    Its niche is when you have many small file that frequently change and
    you want to keep all your subscribers up to date efficiently. I use
    it to maintain mirrors of my website on anyone's site who wants it.
    It also has features to safely propagate files to machines not on the
    net or living on secure nets.


    --
    Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
    http://mindprod.com
    Your top priority should be fixing bugs. If you carry on development,
    you are just creating more places you will have to search for them.
     
    Roedy Green, Sep 16, 2011
    #3
  4. Tom Anderson <> wrote:
    > On Fri, 16 Sep 2011, Ulli Horlacher wrote:
    >
    > > F*IX is a java applet client for F*EX, a web based software for personal
    > > based file transfer of ANY size:
    > >
    > > http://fex.rus.uni-stuttgart.de/
    > > http://freshmeat.net/projects/fffex/

    >
    > In your "You have the following possibilities" section, you don't mention
    > BitTorrent.


    BitTorrent is not designed for PERSONAL file transfer (user A to user B
    and NOT to user *) and has no privacy option.


    > It's as quick as any direct connection method, and quicker than F*EX,


    I doubt that. With F*EX I have 300 MB/s.


    > because (assuming i have understood F*EX correctly), that requires the
    > uploader to finish uploading before the downloader begins downloading


    F*EX knows both modes: synchronous and asynchronous.


    > BitTorrent does not involve knowing any ancient scripts.


    Neither F*EX does. You can use modern scripts, if you want. But you also
    can use it with ancient web browsers.


    > BitTorrent does not require passwords


    Bad idea, when I want to send my confidential files.


    > Many BitTorrent clients allow you to monitor the transfer to a peer, and
    > to see when it is complete.


    All F*EX clients do this, too.


    > BitTorrent is portable across all popular consumer operating systems, and
    > unix. The protocol is publicly documented


    F*EX too.


    > The main problem with BitTorrent is


    .... its missing privacy and the sender must be online until the download
    has finished. With F*EX you can send your files to the server and then go
    offline.
    Ever heard of e-mail? F*EX works like e-mail, but for files of any size.


    > So, if you are having trouble finding a maintainer for your software,
    > perhaps you should consider switching to BitTorrent.


    BitTorrent is not an option, because it does not solve the problem:
    personal and confidential file transfer from one user A to one user B.


    --
    Ullrich Horlacher Informationssysteme und Serverbetrieb
    Rechenzentrum E-Mail: -stuttgart.de
    Universitaet Stuttgart Tel: ++49-711-685-65868
    Allmandring 30 Fax: ++49-711-682357
    70550 Stuttgart (Germany) WWW: http://www.rus.uni-stuttgart.de/
     
    Ulli Horlacher, Sep 18, 2011
    #4
  5. Ulli Horlacher <-stuttgart.de> wrote:
    >> It's as quick as any direct connection method, and quicker than F*EX,

    > I doubt that. With F*EX I have 300 MB/s.


    Really? I gotta have a look at it then. So far, I get only about
    300 kilobytes/s over my UMTS modem... ;-)

    (SCNR.)
     
    Andreas Leitgeb, Sep 18, 2011
    #5
  6. Andreas Leitgeb <> wrote:
    > Ulli Horlacher <-stuttgart.de> wrote:
    > >> It's as quick as any direct connection method, and quicker than F*EX,

    > > I doubt that. With F*EX I have 300 MB/s.

    >
    > Really?


    Really.


    > I gotta have a look at it then. So far, I get only about
    > 300 kilobytes/s over my UMTS modem... ;-)


    Of course you need the right network for this throuput.


    --
    Ullrich Horlacher Informationssysteme und Serverbetrieb
    Rechenzentrum E-Mail: -stuttgart.de
    Universitaet Stuttgart Tel: ++49-711-685-65868
    Allmandring 30 Fax: ++49-711-682357
    70550 Stuttgart (Germany) WWW: http://www.rus.uni-stuttgart.de/
     
    Ulli Horlacher, Sep 18, 2011
    #6
  7. Ulli Horlacher <-stuttgart.de> wrote:
    > Andreas Leitgeb <> wrote:
    >> Ulli Horlacher <-stuttgart.de> wrote:
    >> >> It's as quick as any direct connection method, and quicker than F*EX,
    >> > I doubt that. With F*EX I have 300 MB/s.

    >> I gotta have a look at it then. So far, I get only about
    >> 300 kilobytes/s over my UMTS modem... ;-)

    > Of course you need the right network for this throuput.


    Damn, I knew there'd be some "Pferdefuß".
     
    Andreas Leitgeb, Sep 18, 2011
    #7
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