Need guidance for learning

Discussion in 'Perl Misc' started by Sara, Jul 16, 2004.

  1. Sara

    Sara Guest

    Hi All,
    I started with (was taught) C and C++, then I learnt to use Perl by
    reading books and examples. Once I knew how to use hashes, regexes,...
    I have been using Perl for all my tasks from text manipulation to
    working with Word and Excel. I am now able to write statements like
    $tagged = "<sentence>\n".join ("\n", map("<word>$_</word>", split (/\,
    */, $sentence)))."\n</sentence>";
    I think I can solve problems by the usual procedural-type of
    programming, but I'd like to use more of references and packages with
    "use strict", more object-oriented like what I did earlier with C++;
    move from Perl4-style programs to Perl5-style if I am right in saying
    that.

    I've been "lurking" in this group for a long time and I've seen the
    code that you people write. In short I want to create programs like
    you people.
    It would be very much helpful if someone could show the path to
    progress, should it be in this order like perlsub, perlref, perlmod,
    perlboot, ... Any other suggestions?

    Thanks for all the guidance!!
    Sara, Jul 16, 2004
    #1
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  2. On 16 Jul 2004 01:42:12 -0700, Sara <> wrote:
    > It would be very much helpful if someone could show the path to
    > progress, should it be in this order like perlsub, perlref, perlmod,
    > perlboot, ... Any other suggestions?


    Under "other", I'd put the Perl Quiz of the Week, see
    http://perl.plover.com/qotw/.
    John J. Trammell, Jul 16, 2004
    #2
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  3. Sara

    Matija Papec Guest

    X-Ftn-To: Sara

    (Sara) wrote:
    >I've been "lurking" in this group for a long time and I've seen the
    >code that you people write. In short I want to create programs like
    >you people.
    >It would be very much helpful if someone could show the path to
    >progress, should it be in this order like perlsub, perlref, perlmod,
    >perlboot, ... Any other suggestions?


    D. Conway wrote great "Object oriented Perl" which has good introduction to
    perl objects and is also loaded with advanced techniques,
    http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~damian/papers/#Object_Oriented_Perl

    There is also Lama book from Randal, but I didn't read it yet,
    http://books.perl.org/book/200

    hope it helps

    --
    Matija
    Matija Papec, Jul 16, 2004
    #3
  4. Sara

    Paul Lalli Guest

    On Fri, 16 Jul 2004, Matija Papec wrote:

    > (Sara) wrote:
    > >I've been "lurking" in this group for a long time and I've seen the
    > >code that you people write. In short I want to create programs like
    > >you people.
    > >It would be very much helpful if someone could show the path to
    > >progress, should it be in this order like perlsub, perlref, perlmod,
    > >perlboot, ... Any other suggestions?

    >
    > D. Conway wrote great "Object oriented Perl" which has good introduction to
    > perl objects and is also loaded with advanced techniques,
    > http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~damian/papers/#Object_Oriented_Perl
    >
    > There is also Lama book from Randal, but I didn't read it yet,
    > http://books.perl.org/book/200


    To clarify, the Llama book is Learning Perl. The book suggested
    above is Learning Perl Objects, References, and Modules. This is the
    followup to Learning Perl. This is the Alpaca book.

    (A "Lama" book would most likely be about Tibetan priests...)

    I have read both the Llama and the Alpaca, and in my never humble opinion,
    they are both excellent works. The Alpaca will definately be helpful on
    your way to understanding objects and modules.

    Paul Lalli
    Paul Lalli, Jul 16, 2004
    #4
  5. Sara

    Matija Papec Guest

    X-Ftn-To: Paul Lalli

    Paul Lalli <> wrote:
    >> There is also Lama book from Randal, but I didn't read it yet,
    >> http://books.perl.org/book/200

    >
    >To clarify, the Llama book is Learning Perl. The book suggested
    >above is Learning Perl Objects, References, and Modules. This is the
    >followup to Learning Perl. This is the Alpaca book.
    >
    >(A "Lama" book would most likely be about Tibetan priests...)


    LOL :)))
    You're right, I guess this was under subconscious influence from perlmonks.
    :)

    >I have read both the Llama and the Alpaca, and in my never humble opinion,
    >they are both excellent works. The Alpaca will definately be helpful on
    >your way to understanding objects and modules.


    Can you compare it against Damian book? Judging from TOC, Alpaca doesn't
    cover some advanced techniques.



    --
    Matija
    Matija Papec, Jul 16, 2004
    #5
  6. Sara

    Sara Guest

    "John J. Trammell" <> wrote in message news:<-swifto.com.invalid>...
    > On 16 Jul 2004 01:42:12 -0700, Sara <> wrote:
    > > It would be very much helpful if someone could show the path to
    > > progress, should it be in this order like perlsub, perlref, perlmod,
    > > perlboot, ... Any other suggestions?

    >
    > Under "other", I'd put the Perl Quiz of the Week, see
    > http://perl.plover.com/qotw/.


    Thanks for all the info!!

    I happened to see the Perl Quiz of the Week for the first time about
    fifteen days back. It has quite interesting problems. I don't know
    when I would raise to that level :-(

    Just one clarification. Would you recommend to take up a book on OO
    directly or is there any prerequisite for it -- like, would it be
    better if I make myself thorough with references and packages.

    I don't want to underuse Perl; write ten lines of code in an
    "undisciplined manner" which can be done neatly in two or three lines.

    Thanks.
    Sara, Jul 17, 2004
    #6
  7. Sara

    Eric Bohlman Guest

    (Sara) wrote in
    news::

    > Just one clarification. Would you recommend to take up a book on OO
    > directly or is there any prerequisite for it -- like, would it be
    > better if I make myself thorough with references and packages.


    I'd definitely make sure I thoroughly understood perlreftut, perlref,
    perldsc, and perlmod, and then go on to perlboot, perltoot and perlobj.
    Quite a bit of learning before you plunk down a single $ENV{CURRENCY} on a
    book.
    Eric Bohlman, Jul 18, 2004
    #7
  8. Sara

    Sara Guest

    Eric Bohlman <> wrote in message news:<Xns9529C64686DA3ebohlmanomsdevcom@130.133.1.4>...
    > (Sara) wrote in
    > news::
    >
    > > Just one clarification. Would you recommend to take up a book on OO
    > > directly or is there any prerequisite for it -- like, would it be
    > > better if I make myself thorough with references and packages.

    >
    > I'd definitely make sure I thoroughly understood perlreftut, perlref,
    > perldsc, and perlmod, and then go on to perlboot, perltoot and perlobj.
    > Quite a bit of learning before you plunk down a single $ENV{CURRENCY} on a
    > book.


    Thanks a lot for all the help and guidance!!
    Sara, Jul 18, 2004
    #8
  9. In article <>,
    Sara <> wrote:

    >Just one clarification. Would you recommend to take up a book on OO
    >directly or is there any prerequisite for it -- like, would it be
    >better if I make myself thorough with references and packages.


    The Alpaca book mentioned above covers this ground as well - the real OOP
    stuff doesn't start until chapter 8, and only a knowledge of 'traditional'
    procedural Perl is assumed (as covered in the Llama). You might want to
    check out the tables of contents and sample chapters of both books at
    perl.oreilly.com to get an idea of what they include - you may well be
    able to jump straight to the Alpaca.

    Richard.
    Richard Williams, Jul 19, 2004
    #9
  10. Sara

    Sara Guest

    (Richard Williams) wrote in message news:<cdh0lu$81n$>...
    > In article <>,
    > Sara <> wrote:
    >
    > >Just one clarification. Would you recommend to take up a book on OO
    > >directly or is there any prerequisite for it -- like, would it be
    > >better if I make myself thorough with references and packages.

    >
    > The Alpaca book mentioned above covers this ground as well - the real OOP
    > stuff doesn't start until chapter 8, and only a knowledge of 'traditional'
    > procedural Perl is assumed (as covered in the Llama). You might want to
    > check out the tables of contents and sample chapters of both books at
    > perl.oreilly.com to get an idea of what they include - you may well be
    > able to jump straight to the Alpaca.
    >
    > Richard.


    Never expected so much of precise guidance, was actually expecting
    flames to shoot out. LOL :)
    Sara, Jul 20, 2004
    #10
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