New videos: "Crockford on JavaScript"

Discussion in 'Javascript' started by Jorge, Feb 16, 2010.

  1. Jorge

    Jorge Guest

    Jorge, Feb 16, 2010
    #1
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  2. Jorge

    JR Guest

    On 16 fev, 17:06, Jorge <> wrote:
    > "The Early Years"http://developer.yahoo.com/yui/theater/video.php?v=crockonjs-1
    >
    > "And Then There Was JavaScript"http://developer.yahoo.com/yui/theater/video.php?v=crockonjs-2
    >
    > Enjoy,


    After reading the following post by Brendan Eich in his weblog, I
    began to distrust the stories told by Douglas Crockford:
    http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/roadmap/archives/2008/04/popularity.html

    Okay, Douglas is very convincing in his presentations and he is a very
    good teacher indeed, but he was not there at Netscape alongside
    Brendan to be able to say what really happened in the "early days" of
    JS. I don't like History as told by non-Historians...

    --
    JR
     
    JR, Feb 17, 2010
    #2
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  3. Jorge

    Scott Sauyet Guest

    On Feb 16, 10:00 pm, JR <> wrote:
    > On 16 fev, 17:06, Jorge <> wrote:
    > After reading the following post by Brendan Eich in his weblog, I
    > began to distrust the stories told by Douglas Crockford:
    > http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/roadmap/archives/2008/04/popularity.html
    >
    > Okay, Douglas is very convincing in his presentations and he is a very
    > good teacher indeed, but he was not there at Netscape alongside
    > Brendan to be able to say what really happened in the "early days" of
    > JS. I don't like History as told by non-Historians...


    Funny, I think that history as told by actual participants is
    generally even further from the truth! :)

    -- Scott
     
    Scott Sauyet, Feb 17, 2010
    #3
  4. Jorge

    Jorge Guest

    On Feb 17, 4:00 am, JR <> wrote:
    >
    > After reading the following post by Brendan Eich in his weblog, I
    > began to distrust the stories told by Douglas Crockford:http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/roadmap/archives/2008/04/popularity.html


    You've got to keep in mind that at that time (just before the summer
    '08) the 3.1 vs 4 battle inside ECMA was at the zenith...
    "harmony" :) only arrived later that summer a day in the middle of
    August, the same day that the subway at 7th/53rd in NYC caught on
    fire.
    --
    Jorge.
     
    Jorge, Feb 17, 2010
    #4
  5. Jorge

    Jorge Guest

    On Feb 17, 5:02 am, Scott Sauyet <> wrote:
    >
    > Funny, I think that history as told by actual participants is
    > generally even further from the truth!  :)


    How can that be ?
    --
    Jorge.
     
    Jorge, Feb 17, 2010
    #5
  6. Jorge

    Jorge Guest

    On Feb 17, 4:00 am, JR <> wrote:
    > On 16 fev, 17:06, Jorge <> wrote:
    >
    > > "The Early Years"http://developer.yahoo.com/yui/theater/video.php?v=crockonjs-1

    >
    > > "And Then There Was JavaScript"http://developer.yahoo.com/yui/theater/video.php?v=crockonjs-2

    >
    > > Enjoy,

    >
    > After reading the following post by Brendan Eich in his weblog, I
    > began to distrust the stories told by Douglas Crockford:http://weblogs.mozillazine.org/roadmap/archives/2008/04/popularity.html
    >
    > Okay, Douglas is very convincing in his presentations and he is a very
    > good teacher indeed, but he was not there at Netscape alongside
    > Brendan to be able to say what really happened in the "early days" of
    > JS. I don't like History as told by non-Historians...


    So you think that a guy that has lived mostly all such in first
    person, as is the case of Crockford, can't tell the story as he sees
    fit ?

    Or, OIW, when you grow older, let's say some tens of years from now,
    won't you be telling the story of JS as you know it because you've
    lived it ?
    --
    Jorge.
     
    Jorge, Feb 17, 2010
    #6
  7. Jorge

    Scott Sauyet Guest

    On Feb 17, 4:26 am, Jorge wrote:
    > On Feb 17, 5:02 am, Scott Sauyet wrote:
    >> Funny, I think that history as told by actual participants is
    >> generally even further from the truth!  :)

    >
    > How can that be ?


    The job of historians is to sift through conflicting accounts and
    arrive at something most resembling truth. People's memories are
    notoriously unreliable. Ask college students about their high school
    grades, and they almost universally inflate them, not out of any
    attempt to deceive, but just because our memories tend toward the
    positive. I heard a story today about a woman who could still
    describe in great detail the first television set her family got in
    1959, and all the activity involved in getting it installed. But it
    was clear that there might be some issues with her memory, because,
    she says, "and I can still clearly see the faces of the two men who
    delivered it. They were Nixon and Kruschev." :)

    -- Scott
     
    Scott Sauyet, Feb 17, 2010
    #7
  8. Jorge

    Jorge Guest

    On Feb 17, 8:43 pm, Scott Sauyet <> wrote:
    > On Feb 17, 4:26 am, Jorge wrote:
    >
    > > On Feb 17, 5:02 am, Scott Sauyet wrote:
    > >> Funny, I think that history as told by actual participants is
    > >> generally even further from the truth!  :)

    >
    > > How can that be ?

    >
    > The job of historians is to sift through conflicting accounts and
    > arrive at something most resembling truth.  People's memories are
    > notoriously unreliable.  Ask college students about their high school
    > grades, and they almost universally inflate them, not out of any
    > attempt to deceive, but just because our memories tend toward the
    > positive.  I heard a story today about a woman who could still
    > describe in great detail the first television set her family got in
    > 1959, and all the activity involved in getting it installed.  But it
    > was clear that there might be some issues with her memory, because,
    > she says, "and I can still clearly see the faces of the two men who
    > delivered it.  They were Nixon and Kruschev."  :)


    Yeah, no autobiographies, then.
    --
    Jorge.
     
    Jorge, Feb 17, 2010
    #8
  9. Jorge

    Scott Sauyet Guest

    On Feb 17, 4:27 pm, Jorge wrote:
    > On Feb 17, 8:43 pm, Scott Sauyet wrote:
    >> On Feb 17, 4:26 am, Jorge wrote:
    >>> On Feb 17, 5:02 am, Scott Sauyet wrote:
    >>>> Funny, I think that history as told by actual participants is
    >>>> generally even further from the truth!  :)

    >
    >>> How can that be ?

    >
    >> The job of historians is to sift through conflicting accounts and
    >> arrive at something most resembling truth.  People's memories are
    >> notoriously unreliable.  [ ... ]

    >
    > Yeah, no autobiographies, then.


    Of course autobiographies are useful. But you'd better expect that
    there are glosses over the less flattering aspects of the author's
    life. Some of these are intentional, but others are simply due to
    failures of memory.

    -- Scott
     
    Scott Sauyet, Feb 17, 2010
    #9
  10. Jorge

    Jorge Guest

    On Feb 17, 11:07 pm, Scott Sauyet <> wrote:
    > On Feb 17, 4:27 pm, Jorge wrote:
    >
    > > On Feb 17, 8:43 pm, Scott Sauyet wrote:
    > >> On Feb 17, 4:26 am, Jorge wrote:
    > >>> On Feb 17, 5:02 am, Scott Sauyet wrote:
    > >>>> Funny, I think that history as told by actual participants is
    > >>>> generally even further from the truth!  :)

    >
    > >>> How can that be ?

    >
    > >> The job of historians is to sift through conflicting accounts and
    > >> arrive at something most resembling truth.  People's memories are
    > >> notoriously unreliable.  [ ... ]

    >
    > > Yeah, no autobiographies, then.

    >
    > Of course autobiographies are useful.  But you'd better expect that
    > there are glosses over the less flattering aspects of the author's
    > life.  Some of these are intentional, but others are simply due to
    > failures of memory.


    Exactly the same thing can do/happen when/if the "historian" is a 3rd
    person.
    --
    Jorge.
     
    Jorge, Feb 18, 2010
    #10
  11. Jorge

    Jorge Guest

    On Feb 18, 9:27 am, Jorge <> wrote:
    > On Feb 17, 11:07 pm, Scott Sauyet <> wrote:
    >
    > > Of course autobiographies are useful.  But you'd better expect that
    > > there are glosses over the less flattering aspects of the author's
    > > life.  Some of these are intentional, but others are simply due to
    > > failures of memory.

    >
    > Exactly the same thing can do/happen when/if the "historian" is a 3rd
    > person.


    For example, the Spanish Civil War as told by Paul Preston is a fairy
    story (read:fabrication, invention, fiction), the one by Stanley G.
    Payne is radically different but closer to the facts, and there's also
    the one by Ricardo De la Cierva, which depicts the truth much better
    than these outsiders, for obvious reasons.
    --
    Jorge.
     
    Jorge, Feb 18, 2010
    #11
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