Old HTML?

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Phillip Mann, Sep 8, 2007.

  1. Phillip Mann

    Phillip Mann Guest

    From all the messages about "font size" vs "h's", it's my
    understanding that the old html don't work anymore.

    Is this true just for some people in this newsgroup or is it
    universal?

    Phil

    www.BluegrassBanjo.com
    www.BluegrassBanjo.org

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    Phillip Mann, Sep 8, 2007
    #1
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  2. Phillip Mann wrote:

    > From all the messages about "font size" vs "h's", it's my
    > understanding that the old html don't work anymore.


    It will still "work", for some value of "work." Would you not care to
    take advantage of, for example, search engine rating headings higher
    than regular text?

    <p><font size=+2>How about ease of maintenance?</font></p>
    <h1>How about ease of maintenance?</h1>

    > Is this true just for some people in this newsgroup or is it
    > universal?


    Well, the more people that tune in here and find out they are still
    writing 1996 markup, and update their style, the better the web will be
    in the future.

    Would you rather drive a 1996 car, or a 2007 car?

    --
    -bts
    -Motorcycles defy gravity; cars just suck
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Sep 8, 2007
    #2
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  3. Phillip Mann

    Phillip Mann Guest

    On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 00:57:14 GMT, "Beauregard T. Shagnasty"
    <> wrote:

    >Would you rather drive a 1996 car, or a 2007 car?


    Man, I'm REALLY in trouble. I drive a 1995 Toyota pickup.<G>

    Phil

    www.BluegrassBanjo.com
    www.BluegrassBanjo.org

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    Phillip Mann, Sep 8, 2007
    #3
  4. Phillip Mann

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    Phillip Mann <> wrote:

    > On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 00:57:14 GMT, "Beauregard T. Shagnasty"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >Would you rather drive a 1996 car, or a 2007 car?

    >
    > Man, I'm REALLY in trouble. I drive a 1995 Toyota pickup.<G>


    That is not an answer. Here is something closer:

    "Yes, I prefer driving my old 1971 Ford than a 2007 car".

    --
    dorayme
     
    dorayme, Sep 8, 2007
    #4
  5. Phillip Mann wrote:
    > On Sat, 08 Sep 2007 00:57:14 GMT, "Beauregard T. Shagnasty"
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >>Would you rather drive a 1996 car, or a 2007 car?

    >
    > Man, I'm REALLY in trouble. I drive a 1995 Toyota pickup.<G>


    Less than two years ago I retired my 1976 Triumph.


    --
    Blinky RLU 297263
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project:
    http://improve-usenet.org <----------- New Site Aug 28
     
    Blinky the Shark, Sep 8, 2007
    #5
  6. Phillip Mann wrote:

    > "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" wrote:
    >>Would you rather drive a 1996 car, or a 2007 car?

    >
    > Man, I'm REALLY in trouble. I drive a 1995 Toyota pickup.<G>


    That's newer than my pickup by a year. But I write 2007 code. :)

    --
    -bts
    -Motorcycles defy gravity; cars just suck
     
    Beauregard T. Shagnasty, Sep 8, 2007
    #6
  7. Phillip Mann

    asdf Guest

    "Beauregard T. Shagnasty" <> wrote in message
    news:KrmEi.506138$...
    > Phillip Mann wrote:
    >
    >> From all the messages about "font size" vs "h's", it's my
    >> understanding that the old html don't work anymore.

    >
    > It will still "work", for some value of "work." Would you not care to
    > take advantage of, for example, search engine rating headings higher
    > than regular text?
    >
    > <p><font size=+2>How about ease of maintenance?</font></p>
    > <h1>How about ease of maintenance?</h1>
    >
    >> Is this true just for some people in this newsgroup or is it
    >> universal?

    >
    > Well, the more people that tune in here and find out they are still
    > writing 1996 markup, and update their style, the better the web will be
    > in the future.
    >
    > Would you rather drive a 1996 car, or a 2007 car?
    >
    > --
    > -bts
    > -Motorcycles defy gravity; cars just suck




    ....the 1996 car was easier and cheaper to maintain and repair than the 2007
    model. :|
     
    asdf, Sep 8, 2007
    #7
  8. Scripsit Phillip Mann:

    > From all the messages about "font size" vs "h's", it's my
    > understanding that the old html don't work anymore.


    Oh, _you_ are the person (or entity) who sent my cryptic email with the
    heading "html".

    If you are not a troll, please find a decent book on web design and read it,
    before a) posting to HTML related groups and b) trying to do any work on web
    pages. And before posting anything to Usenet, find some of the nice "how do
    I post to Usenet" pages and read it.

    > ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure


    Thank you for the bogosity alert.

    --
    Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
    http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Sep 8, 2007
    #8
  9. Phillip Mann

    JohnW-Mpls Guest

    On Fri, 07 Sep 2007 19:44:30 -0500, Phillip Mann
    <> wrote:

    >From all the messages about "font size" vs "h's", it's my
    >understanding that the old html don't work anymore.
    >
    >Is this true just for some people in this newsgroup or is it
    >universal?
    >
    >Phil
    >


    The good old <font> tag is deprecated which means something else is
    preferred. However, browsers dare not ignore it - far too deeply
    embedded in too many files. The use of css code is recommended but
    that always takes up more space for no technical advantage.

    Compared to the H's, the font tag does not add vertical spaces.
    As others have said, though, the H's get higher recognition by search
    engines.

    -
    JohnW-Mpls
     
    JohnW-Mpls, Sep 10, 2007
    #9
  10. Phillip Mann

    Peter J Ross Guest

    In alt.html on Mon, 10 Sep 2007 07:41:59 -0500, JohnW-Mpls
    <> wrote:

    > The good old <font> tag is deprecated which means something else is
    > preferred. However, browsers dare not ignore it - far too deeply
    > embedded in too many files. The use of css code is recommended but
    > that always takes up more space for no technical advantage.


    How does a single CSS rule, in a file referenced from a single line in
    each HTML page, take up more space than dozens or millions of
    identical <font> tags?

    I suppose you could convert every <p><font> to <p style="font"> to get
    the results you describe, but I don't think many people do that.

    --
    PJR :)
     
    Peter J Ross, Sep 10, 2007
    #10
  11. JohnW-Mpls <> writes:

    > The good old <font> tag is deprecated which means something else is
    > preferred. However, browsers dare not ignore it - far too deeply
    > embedded in too many files. The use of css code is recommended but
    > that always takes up more space for no technical advantage.


    Wrong on both counts - CSS streamlines and shrinks markup, and separating
    presentation from content is certainly a technical advantage.

    > Compared to the H's, the font tag does not add vertical spaces.


    Neither "tag" (sic) adds vertical space. HTML is not a layout language -
    that's why <font> was deprecated to begin with.

    Respectfully, you may want to learn HTML before trying to teach it.

    sherm--

    --
    Web Hosting by West Virginians, for West Virginians: http://wv-www.net
    Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
     
    Sherm Pendley, Sep 10, 2007
    #11
  12. Peter J Ross wrote:
    > In alt.html on Mon, 10 Sep 2007 07:41:59 -0500, JohnW-Mpls
    ><> wrote:
    >
    >> The good old <font> tag is deprecated which means something else is
    >> preferred. However, browsers dare not ignore it - far too deeply
    >> embedded in too many files. The use of css code is recommended but
    >> that always takes up more space for no technical advantage.

    >
    > How does a single CSS rule, in a file referenced from a single line in
    > each HTML page, take up more space than dozens or millions of
    > identical <font> tags?
    >
    > I suppose you could convert every <p><font> to <p style="font"> to get
    > the results you describe, but I don't think many people do that.


    Perhaps *he* does, though.

    --
    Blinky RLU 297263
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project:
    http://improve-usenet.org <----------- New Site Aug 28
     
    Blinky the Shark, Sep 10, 2007
    #12
  13. Phillip Mann

    Dan Guest

    Dan, Sep 12, 2007
    #13
  14. Scripsit Dan:

    > On Sep 7, 8:44 pm, Phillip Mann <> wrote:
    >> www.BluegrassBanjo.com
    >> www.BluegrassBanjo.org

    >
    > Your site is both a commercial entity and a noncommercial organization
    > at once?


    Your question is both irrelevant and based on incorrect assumptions.

    Authoritative information on the applicability of top level domain names to
    various purposes is freely available on the Web. Consult it especially
    before making notes that look like accusations on TLD abuse.

    --
    Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
    http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Sep 12, 2007
    #14
  15. Phillip Mann

    Dan Guest

    On Sep 12, 2:32 am, "Jukka K. Korpela" <> wrote:
    > Scripsit Dan:
    >
    > Authoritative information on the applicability of top level domain names to
    > various purposes is freely available on the Web. Consult it especially
    > before making notes that look like accusations on TLD abuse.


    Like RFC 1591?
    http://www.rfc-editor.org/rfc/rfc1591.txt

    COM - This domain is intended for commercial entities, that is
    companies. This domain has grown very large and there is
    concern about the administrative load and system performance
    if
    the current growth pattern is continued. Consideration is
    being taken to subdivide the COM domain and only allow future
    commercial registrations in the subdomains.

    ORG - This domain is intended as the miscellaneous TLD for
    organizations that didn't fit anywhere else. Some non-
    government organizations may fit here.

    So they're saying that their site is both a "commercial entity /
    company" and a "organization that didn't fit anywhere else". I guess
    "noncommercial" isn't officially part of the description of .org, but
    it's implied by the fact that anything commercial belongs in .com, and
    anything in .org is supposed to not fit anywhere else.

    --
    Dan
     
    Dan, Sep 14, 2007
    #15
  16. Scripsit Dan:

    >> Authoritative information on the applicability of top level domain
    >> names to various purposes is freely available on the Web. Consult it
    >> especially before making notes that look like accusations on TLD
    >> abuse.

    >
    > Like RFC 1591?


    If you read it, you'll notice that on the third line it says
    "Informational". Do you know what "Informational" means in the RFC language?

    Have you any idea of how TLDs are defined and managed? Hints: IANA, ICANN.

    > it's implied by the fact that anything commercial belongs in .com, and
    > anything in .org is supposed to not fit anywhere else.


    That's just your wild and wrong assumption. It would not be serious if you
    did not accuse others in public with no other ground than that assumption.

    --
    Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
    http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
     
    Jukka K. Korpela, Sep 14, 2007
    #16
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