[OT] Good C++ book for a Python programmer

Discussion in 'Python' started by rick_muller@yahoo.com, Jan 19, 2005.

  1. Guest

    I'm picking up C++ again after years of using almost nothing but
    Python. I'm frankly enjoying the experience, and it's certainly
    deepening my appreciation of Python (which you can read however you
    like).

    I was wondering whether anyone could recommend a good C++ book, with
    "good" being defined from the perspective of a Python programmer. I
    realize that there isn't a book titled "C++ for Python Programmers",
    but has anyone found one that they think goes particularly well with
    the Python way?

    I'm asking this because evidently the C++ standard has changed a bit
    since 1994, when I bought my books. Who knew that fstream was
    deprecated?

    Thanks in advance...
     
    , Jan 19, 2005
    #1
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  2. Guest

    Rick Muller wrote:
    >I was wondering whether anyone could recommend a good C++ book, with
    >"good" being defined from the perspective of a Python programmer.


    The STL and the template feature of C++ gives the programmer some of
    the functionality of Python (using templates instead of duck typing,
    vectors instead of lists etc.), so a book that introduces these
    features early, such as "Accelerated C++" by Koenig and Moo, could be a
    good start for a Pythonner. The 4th edition of the well-known "C++
    Primer", with Moo as a new co-author, will soon be published. It is a
    more comprehensive and much longer book.
     
    , Jan 19, 2005
    #2
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  3. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I'm picking up C++ again after years of using almost nothing but
    > Python. I'm frankly enjoying the experience, and it's certainly
    > deepening my appreciation of Python (which you can read however you
    > like).
    >

    Gad! After Python, how can you stand it (C++) ?
    Adding object oriented utility to the C language was an atrocity, albeit
    perhaps a necessary one given the state of the art when that particular
    atrocity was committed. Aren't we past this?

    If it is fast, fully compiled code you seek - couldn't you just C a few slow
    functions and use them in your Python?

    Thomas Bartkus
     
    Thomas Bartkus, Jan 19, 2005
    #3
  4. Paul Rubin Guest

    "" <> writes:
    > I was wondering whether anyone could recommend a good C++ book, with
    > "good" being defined from the perspective of a Python programmer. I
    > realize that there isn't a book titled "C++ for Python Programmers",
    > but has anyone found one that they think goes particularly well with
    > the Python way?


    I think it's not possible to really grok C++ without having worked on
    large multi-person C projects and understood what problems C++ tried
    to solve. The only good book I know about C++ is by Stroustrup, "The
    C++ Programming Language" or something like that; it's not an easy
    book though.
     
    Paul Rubin, Jan 19, 2005
    #4
  5. I suggest you google 'C++ tutorial'

    Regards,

    Philippe



    On Wed, 19 Jan 2005 04:08:16 -0800, wrote:

    > I'm picking up C++ again after years of using almost nothing but
    > Python. I'm frankly enjoying the experience, and it's certainly
    > deepening my appreciation of Python (which you can read however you
    > like).
    >
    > I was wondering whether anyone could recommend a good C++ book, with
    > "good" being defined from the perspective of a Python programmer. I
    > realize that there isn't a book titled "C++ for Python Programmers",
    > but has anyone found one that they think goes particularly well with
    > the Python way?
    >
    > I'm asking this because evidently the C++ standard has changed a bit
    > since 1994, when I bought my books. Who knew that fstream was
    > deprecated?
    >
    > Thanks in advance...
     
    Philippe C. Martin, Jan 19, 2005
    #5
  6. <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > The 4th edition of the well-known "C++ Primer", with Moo as a new
    > co-author, will soon be published. It is a
    > more comprehensive and much longer book.


    It is also organized more traditionally than "Accelerated C++."

    "Accelerated C++" is mostly example-driven: It presents problems, shows how
    to solve them, and introduces language and library features as needed for
    particular parts of the solutions. Of course the problems are carefully
    chosen so that the solutions cover the most important parts of the language
    and library, but that fact is not immediately obvious from the nature of the
    problems themselves.

    "C++ Primer" follows the classical approach of treating each part of the
    language and library separately in a single place. For example, there are
    chapters on expressions, statements, functions, templates, object-oriented
    programming, and so on. It is also much more systematic than "Accelerated
    C++." It is also nearly three times the size.

    Which of these books you prefer will depend on your learning style more than
    anything else. If you are willing to read the entire book sequentially, you
    will probably learn C++ faster from "Accelerated C++" than from "C++
    Primer." On the other hand, if you want to see in one place what all the
    different kinds of statements are, so that you can learn about them all at
    once, then you will be more comfortable with "C++ Primer."

    I'm biased, of course, but I believe that either of these books is a better
    starting point for someone unfamiliar with C than any other book I can think
    of.
     
    Andrew Koenig, Jan 19, 2005
    #6
  7. John Hunter Guest

    >>>>> "Philippe" == Philippe C Martin <> writes:

    Philippe> I suggest you google 'C++ tutorial' Regards,

    Stroustup's "The C++ Programming Language" is the best C++ book I've
    read. It is at a fairly high level, and I already had read several
    C++ books before reading it, so it may be tough sledding. But I would
    try this first since you are an experienced programmer and know OO
    concepts, and if it fails to satisfy try something lighter.
    Unfortunately, I didn't like any of the other kinder, gentler overview
    books I read on C++, so can't really recommend anything along those
    lines, though I'm sure they are out there.

    JDH
     
    John Hunter, Jan 19, 2005
    #7
  8. John Hunter wrote:
    >>>>>>"Philippe" == Philippe C Martin <> writes:

    >
    >
    > Philippe> I suggest you google 'C++ tutorial' Regards,
    >
    > Stroustup's "The C++ Programming Language" is the best C++ book I've
    > read. It is at a fairly high level, and I already had read several
    > C++ books before reading it, so it may be tough sledding. But I would
    > try this first since you are an experienced programmer and know OO
    > concepts, and if it fails to satisfy try something lighter.
    > Unfortunately, I didn't like any of the other kinder, gentler overview
    > books I read on C++, so can't really recommend anything along those
    > lines, though I'm sure they are out there.
    >
    > JDH


    For a rationale as to why the language developed the way it did, you
    can read Stroustrup's "The Design and Evolution of C++". This is no
    good for learning the language, but it might be a good library borrow
    to find out why the language is the way it is.


    -Scott David Daniels
     
    Scott David Daniels, Jan 19, 2005
    #8
  9. Craig Ringer Guest

    On Wed, 2005-01-19 at 09:04 -0800, wrote:
    > Rick Muller wrote:
    > >I was wondering whether anyone could recommend a good C++ book, with
    > >"good" being defined from the perspective of a Python programmer.

    >
    > The STL and the template feature of C++ gives the programmer some of
    > the functionality of Python (using templates instead of duck typing,
    > vectors instead of lists etc.),


    I'm particularly fond of internally refcounted objects (as used
    extensively in Qt) and of guarded pointers, myself. The use of these two
    things means one can avoid the "sometimes works, sometimes doesn't" fun
    of referencing deleted memory by accident.

    --
    Craig Ringer
     
    Craig Ringer, Jan 20, 2005
    #9
  10. Ville Vainio Guest

    >>>>> "Rick" == rick muller@yahoo com <> writes:

    Rick> I was wondering whether anyone could recommend a good C++
    Rick> book, with "good" being defined from the perspective of a
    Rick> Python programmer. I

    A good C++ book from the perspective of a Python programmer would be
    one proclaiming that C++ is deprecated as a language, and it has
    become illegal to develop software with it.

    Rick> realize that there isn't a book titled "C++ for Python
    Rick> Programmers", but has anyone found one that they think goes
    Rick> particularly well with the Python way?

    I don't think that's possible, considering the nature of the
    language. Templates are closest to the Python way as far as C++
    technologies go, but they are very unpythonic in their complexity.


    Rick> I'm asking this because evidently the C++ standard has
    Rick> changed a bit since 1994, when I bought my books. Who knew
    Rick> that fstream was deprecated?

    Stroustrup book, already mentioned by others, is the one if you just
    need a "refresh" your knowledge. "Effective C++" and "More effective
    C++" are also great to learn about all the nasty gotchas that your
    Python experience might make you neglect. They are also certain to
    deepen your appreciation of Python ;-).

    --
    Ville Vainio http://tinyurl.com/2prnb
     
    Ville Vainio, Jan 22, 2005
    #10
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