Professional C++

Discussion in 'C++' started by puzzlecracker, Jan 20, 2005.

  1. puzzlecracker, Jan 20, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. puzzlecracker wrote:
    > Hey colleagues, has anyone read Professional C++ by Nicholas A. Solter,
    > Scott J. Kleper
    > (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/t...002-4502796-1724825?v=glance&s=books&n=507846)
    > and can provide a suggestive review?
    >


    Save yourself some money and purchase these books:
    Accelerated C++
    The C++ Programming Language
    The C++ Primer
    Effective C++
    More Effective C++
    The Standard Template Library by Josuttis

    Many of your issues shall be resolved after reading
    the above books. Other recommended books:
    The Art Of Computer Programming (all volumes)
    Data Structures + Algorithms = Programs
    Design Patterns
    Compiler Design (i.e. the Dragon book)

    This should keep you busy for a while.

    --
    Thomas Matthews

    C++ newsgroup welcome message:
    http://www.slack.net/~shiva/welcome.txt
    C++ Faq: http://www.parashift.com/c -faq-lite
    C Faq: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/c-faq/top.html
    alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++ faq:
    http://www.comeaucomputing.com/learn/faq/
    Other sites:
    http://www.josuttis.com -- C++ STL Library book
    http://www.sgi.com/tech/stl -- Standard Template Library
     
    Thomas Matthews, Jan 21, 2005
    #2
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  3. puzzlecracker

    Mike Wahler Guest

    "Thomas Matthews" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > puzzlecracker wrote:
    > > Hey colleagues, has anyone read Professional C++ by Nicholas A. Solter,
    > > Scott J. Kleper
    > >

    (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0764574841/qid=1106263526/sr=
    8-1/ref=pd_csp_1/002-4502796-1724825?v=glance&s=books&n=507846)
    > > and can provide a suggestive review?
    > >

    >


    Pardon me if I may make a few clarifications:

    > Save yourself some money and purchase these books:
    > Accelerated C++

    by Koenig & Moo

    > The C++ Programming Language

    by Bjarne Stroustrup (a.k.a. "god" in C++ circles)
    (be sure to get Third or Special Edition (or later).

    > The C++ Primer


    In case it affects searching for it, note that there is
    no "The" in this title, it's simply "C++ Primer" (by
    Lippman & Lajoie). Also note that the Fourth edition
    is imminent or available, imo worth waiting for --
    Ms. Moo of "Accelerated" fame contributed to this
    edition.

    > Effective C++
    > More Effective C++

    both by Scott Meyers

    Effective STL
    also by Meyers

    > The Standard Template Library by Josuttis


    That's "The C++ Standard Library, a Tutorial and Reference".
    (Josuttis has indeed co-authored, with David Vandevoorde, a book
    on C++ templates, named, unsurprisingly "C++ Templates".)
    (I also have another book by Josuttis which I like, "Object Oriented
    Programming in C++".

    >
    > Many of your issues shall be resolved after reading
    > the above books. Other recommended books:
    > The Art Of Computer Programming (all volumes)

    by Donald Knuth (imo a timeless classic, applicable
    for any programmer, in any language).

    > Data Structures + Algorithms = Programs

    I don't know author(s) of this one

    > Design Patterns

    by Gamma, Helm, Johnson, & Vlissides (often referred
    to as "Gamma et.al." or "Gang of Four")

    > Compiler Design (i.e. the Dragon book)

    I don't know author(s) of this one
    (and I don't think it's necessary for most folks,
    except those interested in compiler design and
    writing compilers)

    >
    > This should keep you busy for a while.


    I have all of the above[*] except the "Dragon Book", and
    I must agree about 'busy'. :)

    [*] I have the CD forms of "Effective" and "Design patterns",
    which are quite convenient (searchable, have copy-pastable
    code, etc.). They also cost less than the hard copy forms.

    HTH,
    -Mike
     
    Mike Wahler, Jan 21, 2005
    #3
  4. puzzlecracker

    Mike Wahler Guest

    "Thomas Matthews" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > puzzlecracker wrote:
    > > Hey colleagues, has anyone read Professional C++ by Nicholas A. Solter,
    > > Scott J. Kleper
    > >

    (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0764574841/qid=1106263526/sr=
    8-1/ref=pd_csp_1/002-4502796-1724825?v=glance&s=books&n=507846)
    > > and can provide a suggestive review?
    > >

    >


    Pardon me if I may make a few clarifications:

    > Save yourself some money and purchase these books:
    > Accelerated C++

    by Koenig & Moo

    > The C++ Programming Language

    by Bjarne Stroustrup (a.k.a. "god" in C++ circles)
    (be sure to get Third or Special Edition (or later).

    > The C++ Primer


    In case it affects searching for it, note that there is
    no "The" in this title, it's simply "C++ Primer" (by
    Lippman & Lajoie). Also note that the Fourth edition
    is imminent or available, imo worth waiting for --
    Ms. Moo of "Accelerated" fame contributed to this
    edition.

    > Effective C++
    > More Effective C++

    both by Scott Meyers

    Effective STL
    also by Meyers

    > The Standard Template Library by Josuttis


    That's "The C++ Standard Library, a Tutorial and Reference".
    (Josuttis has indeed co-authored, with David Vandevoorde, a book
    on C++ templates, named, unsurprisingly "C++ Templates".)
    (I also have another book by Josuttis which I like, "Object Oriented
    Programming in C++".

    >
    > Many of your issues shall be resolved after reading
    > the above books. Other recommended books:
    > The Art Of Computer Programming (all volumes)

    by Donald Knuth (imo a timeless classic, applicable
    for any programmer, in any language).

    > Data Structures + Algorithms = Programs

    I don't know author(s) of this one

    > Design Patterns

    by Gamma, Helm, Johnson, & Vlissides (often referred
    to as "Gamma et.al." or "Gang of Four")

    > Compiler Design (i.e. the Dragon book)

    I don't know author(s) of this one
    (and I don't think it's necessary for most folks,
    except those interested in compiler design and
    writing compilers)

    >
    > This should keep you busy for a while.


    I have all of the above[*] except the "Dragon Book", and
    I must agree about 'busy'. :)

    [*] I have the CD forms of "Effective" and "Design patterns",
    which are quite convenient (searchable, have copy-pastable
    code, etc.). They also cost less than the hard copy forms.

    HTH,
    -Mike
     
    Mike Wahler, Jan 21, 2005
    #4
  5. puzzlecracker

    Mike Wahler Guest

    "Mike Wahler" <> wrote in message
    news:Rs_Hd.1337$...
    >
    > I have all of the above[*] except the "Dragon Book",


    and "DS + A = P"

    -Mike
     
    Mike Wahler, Jan 21, 2005
    #5
  6. puzzlecracker

    GB Guest

    Mike Wahler wrote:
    >
    >> Data Structures + Algorithms = Programs

    >
    > I don't know author(s) of this one


    Niklaus Wirth, the creator of the Pascal programming language, 1975.

    >> Compiler Design (i.e. the Dragon book)

    >
    > I don't know author(s) of this one
    > (and I don't think it's necessary for most folks,
    > except those interested in compiler design and
    > writing compilers)


    The original edition is Aho and Ullman. Later edition has Hopcroft as
    well, I believe.

    Both of these are "classic" books, with about the same stature as The
    Art of Computer Programming (which I think probably has more
    recommending than reading associated with it).

    Gregg
     
    GB, Jan 21, 2005
    #6
  7. * Mike Wahler:
    > "Mike Wahler" <> wrote in message
    > news:Rs_Hd.1337$...
    > >
    > > I have all of the above[*] except the "Dragon Book",

    >
    > and "DS + A = P"


    "DS+A=P" was an extremely nice little book. But one book I remember
    of the same order of niceness, and havent't seen for 15-20 years, was
    about functional programming. It's possible I'm confusing it with the
    Lucid book, but I think it was the one that had a very systematic and
    humorous explanation of "cowboy programmer", "guru", "ivory tower"; I
    just can't remember the title of that book (it was a little larger).

    --
    A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text.
    Q: Why is it such a bad thing?
    A: Top-posting.
    Q: What is the most annoying thing on usenet and in e-mail?
     
    Alf P. Steinbach, Jan 21, 2005
    #7
  8. puzzlecracker

    Jerry Coffin Guest

    [ ... ]

    > and "DS + A = P"


    "A + DS = P", FWIW.

    For anybody who might want to look for it (and I'd certainly add my
    recommendation) the ISBN is 0-13-022418-9

    --
    Later,
    Jerry.

    The universe is a figment of its own imagination.
     
    Jerry Coffin, Jan 21, 2005
    #8
  9. puzzlecracker

    Jerry Coffin Guest

    [ .. ]

    > > Compiler Design (i.e. the Dragon book)

    >
    > I don't know author(s) of this one
    > (and I don't think it's necessary for most folks,
    > except those interested in compiler design and
    > writing compilers)


    Aho, Sethi and Ullman. IMO, it's quite useful outside of compiler
    writing -- parsers are suitable for many complex input formats.

    --
    Later,
    Jerry.

    The universe is a figment of its own imagination.
     
    Jerry Coffin, Jan 21, 2005
    #9
  10. puzzlecracker

    Jerry Coffin Guest

    > The original edition is Aho and Ullman. Later edition has Hopcroft as

    > well, I believe.


    That was Aho, Sethi and Ullman. OTOH, Aho, Hopcraft and Ullman wrote
    _Data Structures and Algorithms_, which would be a reasonable addition
    to the list at hand as well.

    > Both of these are "classic" books, with about the same stature as The


    > Art of Computer Programming (which I think probably has more
    > recommending than reading associated with it).


    He can certainly go a bit overboard in places (e.g. see below), but
    especially those of us with a grey hair or two (no more than two --
    that's my story and I'm sticking to it :) ) really did study it a lot,
    if only because there was a time when serious alternatives hardly
    existed.

    As long as we're recommending books, I'll add in a few more to the
    list:

    _C++ FAQs_ by Cline and Lomow (with other contributors nearly beyond
    count).
    and one that _might_ have been referred to elsethread:

    _Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs_ by Abelson, Sussman
    and Sussman. This uses Scheme rather than C++, but every programmer
    should learn some variant of Lisp in their life -- even if they only
    rarely use it directly.

    _Design and Evolution of C++_ by Bjarne Stroustrup. Tells about _why_
    the language is the way it is. Definitely not a high priority book for
    a beginner, but certainly an interesting read.

    _Introduction to Algorithms_ by Cormen, et al.

    As an aside, I'd note that only ONE of the algorithm books is really
    needed: Knuth OR Cormen et al OR Aho et al. Of the threee, I tend to
    recommend Cormen, et al as a reasonable compromise between the other
    two. Knuth's chapter on sorting alone is about the length of Aho,
    Hopcraft and Ullman's entire book. Cormen has plenty of detail, without
    Knuth's 25+ pages of calculus about Euclid's GCD algorithm (for one
    example). Don't get me wrong, I'm glad I have TAOCP books and (as I
    implied above) I really have studied them quite a lot -- but I suspect
    Knuth often tends to confirm many beginners' worst fears.

    --
    Later,
    Jerry.

    The universe is a figment of its own imagination.
     
    Jerry Coffin, Jan 21, 2005
    #10
  11. "Jerry Coffin" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > _Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs_ by Abelson, Sussman
    > and Sussman. This uses Scheme rather than C++, but every programmer
    > should learn some variant of Lisp in their life -- even if they only
    > rarely use it directly.


    The full text of this book is available free of charge here:

    http://mitpress.mit.edu/sicp/full-text/book/book.html
     
    Andrew Koenig, Jan 21, 2005
    #11
  12. puzzlecracker

    red floyd Guest

    Mike Wahler wrote:
    > "Thomas Matthews" <> wrote in
    > message news:...
    >
    >>puzzlecracker wrote:
    >>
    >>>Hey colleagues, has anyone read Professional C++ by Nicholas A. Solter,
    >>>Scott J. Kleper
    >>>

    >
    > (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0764574841/qid=1106263526/sr=
    > 8-1/ref=pd_csp_1/002-4502796-1724825?v=glance&s=books&n=507846)
    >
    >>>and can provide a suggestive review?
    >>>

    >>

    >
    > Pardon me if I may make a few clarifications:
    >
    >
    >>Save yourself some money and purchase these books:
    >> Accelerated C++

    >
    > by Koenig & Moo
    >
    >
    >> The C++ Programming Language

    >
    > by Bjarne Stroustrup (a.k.a. "god" in C++ circles)
    > (be sure to get Third or Special Edition (or later).
    >
    >
    >> The C++ Primer

    >
    >
    > In case it affects searching for it, note that there is
    > no "The" in this title, it's simply "C++ Primer" (by
    > Lippman & Lajoie). Also note that the Fourth edition
    > is imminent or available, imo worth waiting for --
    > Ms. Moo of "Accelerated" fame contributed to this
    > edition.
    >
    >
    >> Effective C++
    >> More Effective C++

    >
    > both by Scott Meyers
    >
    > Effective STL
    > also by Meyers
    >
    >
    >> The Standard Template Library by Josuttis

    >
    >
    > That's "The C++ Standard Library, a Tutorial and Reference".
    > (Josuttis has indeed co-authored, with David Vandevoorde, a book
    > on C++ templates, named, unsurprisingly "C++ Templates".)
    > (I also have another book by Josuttis which I like, "Object Oriented
    > Programming in C++".
    >
    >
    >>Many of your issues shall be resolved after reading
    >>the above books. Other recommended books:
    >> The Art Of Computer Programming (all volumes)

    >
    > by Donald Knuth (imo a timeless classic, applicable
    > for any programmer, in any language).
    >
    >
    >> Data Structures + Algorithms = Programs

    >
    > I don't know author(s) of this one

    Niklaus Wirth (of Pascal fame)


    >
    >> Compiler Design (i.e. the Dragon book)

    >
    > I don't know author(s) of this one
    > (and I don't think it's necessary for most folks,
    > except those interested in compiler design and
    > writing compilers)


    Aho & Ullman.

    Actually, there are *2* dragon books, the Green Dragon book and the Red
    dragon book. Both are good.
     
    red floyd, Jan 21, 2005
    #12
  13. puzzlecracker

    red floyd Guest

    Jerry Coffin wrote:
    > [ .. ]
    >
    >
    >>> Compiler Design (i.e. the Dragon book)

    >>
    >> I don't know author(s) of this one
    >> (and I don't think it's necessary for most folks,
    >> except those interested in compiler design and
    >> writing compilers)

    >
    >
    > Aho, Sethi and Ullman. IMO, it's quite useful outside of compiler
    > writing -- parsers are suitable for many complex input formats.
    >

    That's the red dragon book. The green dragon book is Aho&Ullman only.
     
    red floyd, Jan 21, 2005
    #13
  14. puzzlecracker

    Jerry Coffin Guest

    > That's the red dragon book. The green dragon book is Aho&Ullman only.

    True, but AFAIK, the green dragon book hasn't been avaialble (at least
    new) for quite a while now, and I can't think of much that would
    justify finding a used copy instead of buying the red dragon book.
    OTOH, if somebody happens to run across a used copy at a good price,
    there's not really a lot of reason to avoid it either, so perhaps
    bringing it up was a good thing anyway.

    --
    Later,
    Jerry.

    The universe is a figment of its own imagination.
     
    Jerry Coffin, Jan 21, 2005
    #14
  15. Jerry Coffin wrote:
    > [ .. ]
    >
    >
    > Aho, Sethi and Ullman. IMO, it's quite useful outside of compiler
    > writing -- parsers are suitable for many complex input formats.
    >

    And it'd be no damage if anyone using a compiler knows a little bit
    about how it does its job ...


    --
    cu
    Martin
     
    Martin Stettner, Jan 22, 2005
    #15
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