Running Direct3D lib under IIS process

Discussion in 'ASP General' started by terdthai@gmail.com, Jan 22, 2009.

  1. Guest

    I have created a D3D lib (it is a COM dll) used for off-screen
    rendering. And make a web service API. Then people can call the web
    API and get a snapshot back from their scene (not define yet, just
    want to run the system first). My target system is windows server 2003
    R2. I have test an ordinary D3D application and it ran fine on the
    machine. However, when I made a call through the web service API that
    called the D3D to create D3D device, it fail to create the device with
    unknown error returned, the output for D3D debugger runtime was
    something like "Graphics hardware acceleration is disabled". This has
    happened before when I ran the normal D3D application but to fix it, I
    just went to Display Properties->Settings->Advanced->Troubleshoot and
    moved the slider bar of "Hardware acceleration from "none" to "full"
    then the D3D application could run fine. but this does not work with
    the call from web service API.

    * When I ran the process explorer, I saw the D3D lib was running under
    iis process. Is there something to do with it?
    * I have implemented web service API using C# and D3D lib is in-
    process COM dll written in C/C++
    * My graphics card is geforce7950.
    * If possible I don't want to migrate in-process COM to out-of-process
    COM. It is a performance issue.
    * I have latest graphics driver.

    Does anybody has a clue about this one?

    Thanks in advance.
     
    , Jan 22, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Steve Guest

    On Jan 22, 12:22 pm, wrote:
    > I have created a D3D lib (it is a COM dll) used for off-screen
    > rendering. And make a web service API. Then people can call the web
    > API and get a snapshot back from their scene (not define yet, just
    > want to run the system first). My target system is windows server 2003
    > R2. I have test an ordinary D3D application and it ran fine on the
    > machine. However, when I made a call through the web service API that
    > called the D3D to create D3D device, it fail to create the device with
    > unknown error returned, the output for D3D debugger runtime was
    > something like "Graphics hardware acceleration is disabled". This has
    > happened before when I ran the normal D3D application but to fix it, I
    > just went to Display Properties->Settings->Advanced->Troubleshoot and
    > moved the slider bar of "Hardware acceleration from "none" to "full"
    > then the D3D application could run fine. but this does not work with
    > the call from web service API.
    >
    > * When I ran the process explorer, I saw the D3D lib was running under
    > iis process. Is there something to do with it?
    > * I have implemented web service API using C# and D3D lib is in-
    > process COM dll written in C/C++
    > * My graphics card is geforce7950.
    > * If possible I don't want to migrate in-process COM to out-of-process
    > COM. It is a performance issue.
    > * I have latest graphics driver.
    >
    > Does anybody has a clue about this one?
    >
    > Thanks in advance.


    Are you using classic ASP or ASP.Net for this? (From the C# comment,
    it looks like you are using .Net)
     
    Steve, Jan 23, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Jack
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    480
  2. Brij
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    2,501
    Sudsy
    Dec 7, 2004
  3. Serdar C.

    direct3d and the web?

    Serdar C., Dec 28, 2003, in forum: ASP .Net Web Controls
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    175
    Guest
    Dec 30, 2003
  4. Whiskey Romeo Lima
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    561
    Whiskey Romeo Lima
    Jul 16, 2009
  5. Kenjis Kaan
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    124
    Randy Kobes
    Jun 29, 2003
Loading...

Share This Page