SMTP solution when on the road?

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Sgt Owens, Feb 28, 2005.

  1. Sgt Owens

    Sgt Owens Guest

    When traveling I never know who my on-the-road ISP will be so sending mail
    requires a third party SMTP. I've tried a free one but spammers destroyed
    it and now that service is heavily blacklisted and useless.

    I have my own website. Is there a way I can send mail from the road through
    my website, or does anyone have any other creative ideas? Thanks.

    Sgt Owens
     
    Sgt Owens, Feb 28, 2005
    #1
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  2. Sgt Owens

    saz Guest

    In article <y1GUd.9838$>,
    says...
    > When traveling I never know who my on-the-road ISP will be so sending mail
    > requires a third party SMTP. I've tried a free one but spammers destroyed
    > it and now that service is heavily blacklisted and useless.
    >
    > I have my own website. Is there a way I can send mail from the road through
    > my website, or does anyone have any other creative ideas? Thanks.
    >
    > Sgt Owens
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Do you have webmail capabilities through your web host? Most provide
    that free of charge, and it's already built into CPanel.

    I have used mail2web.com in the past.
     
    saz, Feb 28, 2005
    #2
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  3. Sgt Owens

    Spartanicus Guest

    "Sgt Owens" <> wrote:

    >When traveling I never know who my on-the-road ISP will be so sending mail
    >requires a third party SMTP. I've tried a free one but spammers destroyed
    >it and now that service is heavily blacklisted and useless.


    Install a smtp server on your portable, then you can route directly
    without the need of an ISP provided smtp server.

    But this off topic here.

    --
    Spartanicus
     
    Spartanicus, Feb 28, 2005
    #3
  4. Many ISPs offer some form of web based email access. Check yours. If
    they do, then it is a simple matter of logging in and checking, replying,
    and sendinf mail.

    Carolyn

    On Mon, 28 Feb 2005 14:38:22 +0000, Sgt Owens wrote:

    > When traveling I never know who my on-the-road ISP will be so sending mail
    > requires a third party SMTP. I've tried a free one but spammers destroyed
    > it and now that service is heavily blacklisted and useless.
    >
    > I have my own website. Is there a way I can send mail from the road through
    > my website, or does anyone have any other creative ideas? Thanks.
    >
    > Sgt Owens
     
    Carolyn Marenger, Feb 28, 2005
    #4
  5. Per Sgt Owens:
    >I've tried a free one but spammers destroyed
    >it and now that service is heavily blacklisted and useless.
    >
    >I have my own website. Is there a way I can send mail from the road through
    >my website, or does anyone have any other creative ideas? Thanks.


    I'm not very knowledgable in this area, but what I'm hearing is that when you
    use a certain address, the volume of spam soon makes that address useless.

    Somebody who knows something probably has a better idea, but what I do is spend
    six bucks a month for Cotse.net. This gives my domain name a home for email
    (web stuff is somewhere else) and offers a comprehensive list of anti-spam/mail
    control tools like SMTP-level GoldList, sender WhiteList, recipient WhiteList,
    Baysian filtering, SpamCop, unlimited addresses and so-forth.

    Unfiltered and unprotected, my domain name was getting 6,000-7000 spams per day
    when I checked about six months ago, probably more as I write this - yet I see
    only one or two each day. The vast majority are dictionary attacks.

    I have a "real" address that I share with friends and is just a few letters
    instead of a name - unlikely tb included in a dictionary attack. I also try to
    put everybody who sends me legitimate email on the sender WhiteList.

    Everybody else gets either a manually-created address that I add to the GoldList
    and WhiteList or an address in the format of yyyymmdd.DomainName.Net which
    automagically becomes part of the GoldList and WhiteList until it expires on
    yyyymmdd.

    When one of my manually-created addresses starts attracting spam, I just remove
    it from the GoldList. I seldom make up a replacement/notify whoever it was
    given to because the reason it started attracting spam is probably related to
    whoever was entrusted with it.

    I use the yyyymmdd facility from time-to-time, but usually do the bogus
    address/GoldList/WhiteList thing because I derive some perverse satisfaction
    from knowing who is abusing my addresses - especially the commercial outfits
    that have the "Don't Share My Address" checkbox on their screens.


    --
    PeteCresswell
     
    (Pete Cresswell), Feb 28, 2005
    #5
  6. Sgt Owens

    Andy Dingley Guest

    It was somewhere outside Barstow when Spartanicus <>
    wrote:

    >Install a smtp server on your portable, then you can route directly
    >without the need of an ISP provided smtp server.


    How would that help ?

    SMTP is SMTP. It doesn't matter if your machine is trying to talk to
    another SMTP server from your own mail client, or from your own MTA
    (aka SMTP server). The remote SMTP server will either accept your mail
    or it won't, and this choice is due to whether it trusts you, not what
    program you're running to implement SMTP.

    To "route directly" as you describe it, that assumes that "many SMTP
    servers trust other unknown SMTP servers". Now this _used_ to be true,
    but spam killed it. These days such trusting SMTP servers are termed
    "open relays" and even if you can still find one, it's quite probably
    blacklisted.


    (When I travel, I use my mail provider's web-mail interface. I hate
    it, and I have to cc: myself to keep copies in the real place. But
    it's less painful than trying to make SMTP authentication work in a
    reliable manner)
    --
    Smert' spamionam
     
    Andy Dingley, Mar 1, 2005
    #6
  7. in alt.html, Andy Dingley wrote:

    > (When I travel, I use my mail provider's web-mail interface.


    I just use ssh tunnel to my smtp server.

    --
    Lauri Raittila <http://www.iki.fi/lr> <http://www.iki.fi/zwak/fonts>
    Utrecht, NL.
     
    Lauri Raittila, Mar 1, 2005
    #7
  8. Sgt Owens

    Sgt Owens Guest

    Lauri, I Googled ssh tunnel and it looks interesting but above my level of
    expertise. Is there an easy ssh tunnel solution you can point me to?
    Thanks.

    --


    "Lauri Raittila" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > in alt.html, Andy Dingley wrote:
    >
    >> (When I travel, I use my mail provider's web-mail interface.

    >
    > I just use ssh tunnel to my smtp server.
    >
    > --
    > Lauri Raittila <http://www.iki.fi/lr> <http://www.iki.fi/zwak/fonts>
    > Utrecht, NL.
     
    Sgt Owens, Mar 1, 2005
    #8
  9. "Sgt Owens" <> wrote in message
    news:y1GUd.9838$...
    > When traveling I never know who my on-the-road ISP will be so sending mail
    > requires a third party SMTP. I've tried a free one but spammers destroyed
    > it and now that service is heavily blacklisted and useless.
    >
    > I have my own website. Is there a way I can send mail from the road
    > through
    > my website, or does anyone have any other creative ideas? Thanks.



    Your host should offer you an alternate port (other than Port 25, which most
    ISPs now block) so that you can send email via your domain name, regardless
    of which ISP you connect with. If they don't offer you one, request that
    they do. If they decline your request, find a new host. ;-)

    --Tina
    --
    http://www.AffordableHOST.com - Multi-Domain & Reseller Cpanel Hosting
    ++ 20% Discount Coupon Code ++: newsgroup
    Serving the web since 1997
     
    Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc,, Mar 1, 2005
    #9
  10. Sgt Owens

    Andy Dingley Guest

    It was somewhere outside Barstow when "Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc,"
    <> wrote:

    >Your host should offer you an alternate port


    Oh great, voodoo security. 8-(

    If it's secure, stick it on 25. If it's not secure, don't stick it
    anywhere. Port scanning will find it wherever you "hide" it.
     
    Andy Dingley, Mar 2, 2005
    #10
  11. Sgt Owens

    Andy Dingley Guest

    It was somewhere outside Barstow when Lauri Raittila
    <> wrote:

    >I just use ssh tunnel to my smtp server.


    That's great, but presumably it means you're running your _own_ SMTP
    server, and you've set up SSH access to it. I don't know of any ISPs
    who offer this sort of access.
     
    Andy Dingley, Mar 2, 2005
    #11
  12. in alt.html, Andy Dingley wrote:
    > It was somewhere outside Barstow when Lauri Raittila
    > <> wrote:
    >
    > >I just use ssh tunnel to my smtp server.

    >
    > That's great, but presumably it means you're running your _own_ SMTP
    > server,


    No, I am not...

    > and you've set up SSH access to it. I don't know of any ISPs
    > who offer this sort of access.


    Hm. It's my university (not the one in Utrecht, their IT department
    sucks). So you can't buy it.

    I would think this is business opportinity to someone. There must be
    plenty of people having problems on finding smtp server to use with their
    laptops when traveling. Plenty of rich businessman. If someone makes
    money with it, I would like to have some too...

    (webmail is not really usable alternative, it sucks on offline use - and
    internet in moving objects is not that usual.)

    --
    Lauri Raittila <http://www.iki.fi/lr> <http://www.iki.fi/zwak/fonts>
    Utrecht, NL.
     
    Lauri Raittila, Mar 2, 2005
    #12
  13. "Andy Dingley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > It was somewhere outside Barstow when "Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc,"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>Your host should offer you an alternate port

    >
    > Oh great, voodoo security. 8-(
    >
    > If it's secure, stick it on 25. If it's not secure, don't stick it
    > anywhere. Port scanning will find it wherever you "hide" it.



    You don't exactly understand, I think. ;-)

    ISPs block you from sending email, that isn't hosted on their network, on
    Port 25. Port 2525 can be just as secure as Port 25 (who cares if someone
    knows you allow outgoing email on Port 2525??). But, by offering Port 2525,
    for example, you greatly help your hosting customers' by allowing them to
    circumvent their ISPs blocking of Port 25.

    More and more hosts are opening up an alternate port, so that their
    customers can continue to send email from ...without
    having to be tied to their ISPs SMTP server.

    --Tina
    --
    http://www.AffordableHOST.com - Multi-Domain & Reseller Cpanel Hosting
    ++ 20% Discount Coupon Code ++: newsgroup
    Serving the web since 1997
     
    Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc,, Mar 2, 2005
    #13
  14. Sgt Owens

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc, wrote:

    > ISPs block you from sending email, that isn't hosted on their network,
    > on Port 25.


    Mine doesn't. Don't think I've ever been on an ISP that did.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Mar 2, 2005
    #14
  15. Sgt Owens

    Andy Dingley Guest

    It was somewhere outside Barstow when "Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc,"
    <> wrote:

    >ISPs block you from sending email, that isn't hosted on their network, on
    >Port 25.


    No they don't. They block _other_people_ from connecting to an open
    SMTP relay you might be hosting.

    An ISP that does block outgoing 25 is just a crook, Run away.
     
    Andy Dingley, Mar 2, 2005
    #15
  16. "Andy Dingley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > It was somewhere outside Barstow when "Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc,"
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >>ISPs block you from sending email, that isn't hosted on their network, on
    >>Port 25.

    >
    > No they don't. They block _other_people_ from connecting to an open
    > SMTP relay you might be hosting.
    >
    > An ISP that does block outgoing 25 is just a crook, Run away.


    Most major ISPs block Port 25 now.

    My point is, this has nothing to do with security (on the hosts side) as you
    were suggesting. Its merely providing a service to the customer, by
    allowing them to circumvent their ISPs blocking of Port 25. That's all,
    nothing more.

    Its really not an argument or debate...its simply a nice thing for hosts to
    do for their customers. If your host won't accomodate you, since most major
    ISPs now block Port 25, then you might want to find a host that does allow
    you to send on an alternate SMTP port.

    --Tina
    --
    http://www.AffordableHOST.com - Multi-Domain & Reseller Cpanel Hosting
    ++ 20% Discount Coupon Code ++: newsgroup
    Serving the web since 1997
     
    Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc,, Mar 2, 2005
    #16
  17. Sgt Owens

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Andy Dingley wrote:

    > To "route directly" as you describe it, that assumes that "many SMTP
    > servers trust other unknown SMTP servers". Now this _used_ to be true,
    > but spam killed it. These days such trusting SMTP servers are termed
    > "open relays" and even if you can still find one, it's quite probably
    > blacklisted.


    "routing direct" does not imply "open relay".

    Routing directly means that my own PC sees I'm sending an email to
    example.org, it uses DNS to look up the MX server for example.org,
    connects to port 25 on that server and sends the message.

    The other option is to use your ISP's mail server, in which case your PC
    doesn't bother checking who the message is to, connects to
    mail.yourisp.com and sends the message. Then mail.yourisp.com does all the
    hard work.

    Open relays are a third situation. Somebody has a message bound for
    example.org and they send it via a completely unrelated third-party
    server. This has spam implications, which is why running an open relay
    is now frowned upon.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Mar 2, 2005
    #17
  18. Sgt Owens

    Andy Dingley Guest

    It was somewhere outside Barstow when "Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc,"
    <> wrote:

    >If your host won't accomodate you, since most major
    >ISPs now block Port 25,


    Not for outgoing. No doubt some do, but "most" certainly don't.

    There's no need to block outgoing 25 at all, because there's nothing
    "bad" to connect to through it. An open relay is a bad thing
    certainly, but we've addressed that problem by clamping down on open
    relays - if necessary, by blacklisting them. In an environment where
    open relays are now extinct (to practical purposes) there's just no
    problem with allowing ISP customers all the outgoing 25 they might
    wish.
     
    Andy Dingley, Mar 2, 2005
    #18
  19. "Toby Inkster" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > Andy Dingley wrote:
    >
    >> To "route directly" as you describe it, that assumes that "many SMTP
    >> servers trust other unknown SMTP servers". Now this _used_ to be true,
    >> but spam killed it. These days such trusting SMTP servers are termed
    >> "open relays" and even if you can still find one, it's quite probably
    >> blacklisted.

    >
    > "routing direct" does not imply "open relay".
    >
    > Routing directly means that my own PC sees I'm sending an email to
    > example.org, it uses DNS to look up the MX server for example.org,
    > connects to port 25 on that server and sends the message.
    >
    > The other option is to use your ISP's mail server, in which case your PC
    > doesn't bother checking who the message is to, connects to
    > mail.yourisp.com and sends the message. Then mail.yourisp.com does all the
    > hard work.
    >
    > Open relays are a third situation. Somebody has a message bound for
    > example.org and they send it via a completely unrelated third-party
    > server. This has spam implications, which is why running an open relay
    > is now frowned upon.



    I didn't get Andy's last reply and Google Groups seems to have dropped it as
    well. :-(

    --Tina
    --
    http://www.AffordableHOST.com - Multi-Domain & Reseller Cpanel Hosting
    ++ 20% Discount Coupon Code ++: newsgroup
    Serving the web since 1997
     
    Tina - AffordableHOST, Inc,, Mar 2, 2005
    #19
  20. Sgt Owens

    Andy Dingley Guest

    It was somewhere outside Barstow when Toby Inkster
    <> wrote:

    >"routing direct" does not imply "open relay".


    True enough formally, but there's still a risk in there. The spammer
    might only be able to spam members of the destination server's
    organisation (i.e. it's open, but no longer a relay) but that's still
    a nuisance.
     
    Andy Dingley, Mar 2, 2005
    #20
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