surfing other sites within a page

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Bill, Jan 31, 2005.

  1. Bill

    Bill Guest

    My geographically separated family are currently searching real estate pages
    for a house.

    Using php I have set up a mysql database that we can enter urls of
    interesting houses into so we can then all look at them.
    To do this we need to have two browser windows open, one on the real estate
    site and a smaller one below it on my php page.
    To enter a url into the database means copying it from the real estate page
    window and pasting it into an input box on the php page.
    To view the real estate pages means doing the same in reverse - copying from
    a list generated from the database and pasting it into the real estate
    browser
    (I have found this better than clicking on a link in that list to go to the
    real estate site and then having to use the browser navigation to get back
    to the php page and then click on another link)
    It strikes me there has to be a smoother way of doing it.

    I would welcome any suggestions (using frames if necessary) as to how I
    could streamline the process I have outlined above.
    There are two tasks I need to accomplish:
    1. save the url to the database
    2. view a url stored in the database

    Ideally I would like to see a fully surfable real estate window (or frame)
    above a smaller database window such that by clicking buttons within the
    database window I could add the real estate url to the database when I come
    across an interesting one, or by clicking on a link in the database window
    open a page in the real estate window.
    (By "fully surfable" I mean it is not just a matter of displaying the
    contents of a real estate site within a second frame. I would like to be
    able to surf through the site and/or go to other sites and so need an
    independent address bar that does not take me away from the database page to
    be able to do this)

    TIA
    B
    Bill, Jan 31, 2005
    #1
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  2. Bill

    Linda Guest

    "Bill" <> wrote in message
    news:ANxLd.13451$...
    > My geographically separated family are currently searching real estate

    pages
    > for a house.
    >
    > Using php I have set up a mysql database that we can enter urls of
    > interesting houses into so we can then all look at them.
    > To do this we need to have two browser windows open, one on the real

    estate
    > site and a smaller one below it on my php page.
    > To enter a url into the database means copying it from the real estate

    page
    > window and pasting it into an input box on the php page.
    > To view the real estate pages means doing the same in reverse - copying

    from
    > a list generated from the database and pasting it into the real estate
    > browser
    > (I have found this better than clicking on a link in that list to go to

    the
    > real estate site and then having to use the browser navigation to get back
    > to the php page and then click on another link)
    > It strikes me there has to be a smoother way of doing it.
    >
    > I would welcome any suggestions (using frames if necessary) as to how I
    > could streamline the process I have outlined above.
    > There are two tasks I need to accomplish:
    > 1. save the url to the database
    > 2. view a url stored in the database
    >
    > Ideally I would like to see a fully surfable real estate window (or frame)
    > above a smaller database window such that by clicking buttons within the
    > database window I could add the real estate url to the database when I

    come
    > across an interesting one, or by clicking on a link in the database window
    > open a page in the real estate window.
    > (By "fully surfable" I mean it is not just a matter of displaying the
    > contents of a real estate site within a second frame. I would like to be
    > able to surf through the site and/or go to other sites and so need an
    > independent address bar that does not take me away from the database page

    to
    > be able to do this)
    >
    > TIA
    > B
    >
    >
    >


    There is a free service on the internet you could use called furl here's the
    details :

    http://www.furl.net/index.jsp

    Below is an explanation I copied and pasted from their site:

    Furl is a free service that saves a personal copy of any page you find on
    the Web, and lets you find it again instantly by searching your archive of
    pages. It's your Personal Web.
    Furl offers the best ways to share the content you find on the Web, and
    recommends new Web pages that may interest you. You can also search Furl to
    find the best sites that other people are saving.

    Furl is used for many purposes by many types of people. For travel planning.
    Recipe sharing. House-hunting. Medical research. Thousands of people use
    Furl every day to save, share and discover information that is important to
    them.


    All the best,
    Linda
    Linda, Jan 31, 2005
    #2
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  3. Bill

    Bill Guest

    > There is a free service on the internet you could use called furl here's
    > the
    > details :
    >
    > http://www.furl.net/index.jsp


    Thanks for this Linda. Furl is good at storing the urls but I have a
    problem with it in that you need to click through a couple of links to get
    to the page you have stored. On balance it is no more efficient than what I
    have set up myself..
    Bill, Feb 1, 2005
    #3
  4. Bill

    Richard Guest

    On Tue, 1 Feb 2005 10:50:27 +1300 Bill wrote:

    > My geographically separated family are currently searching real estate
    > pages
    > for a house.


    > Using php I have set up a mysql database that we can enter urls of
    > interesting houses into so we can then all look at them.
    > To do this we need to have two browser windows open, one on the real
    > estate
    > site and a smaller one below it on my php page.
    > To enter a url into the database means copying it from the real estate
    > page
    > window and pasting it into an input box on the php page.
    > To view the real estate pages means doing the same in reverse - copying
    > from
    > a list generated from the database and pasting it into the real estate
    > browser
    > (I have found this better than clicking on a link in that list to go to
    > the
    > real estate site and then having to use the browser navigation to get
    > back
    > to the php page and then click on another link)
    > It strikes me there has to be a smoother way of doing it.


    > I would welcome any suggestions (using frames if necessary) as to how I
    > could streamline the process I have outlined above.
    > There are two tasks I need to accomplish:
    > 1. save the url to the database
    > 2. view a url stored in the database


    > Ideally I would like to see a fully surfable real estate window (or
    > frame)
    > above a smaller database window such that by clicking buttons within
    > the
    > database window I could add the real estate url to the database when I
    > come
    > across an interesting one, or by clicking on a link in the database
    > window
    > open a page in the real estate window.
    > (By "fully surfable" I mean it is not just a matter of displaying the
    > contents of a real estate site within a second frame. I would like to
    > be
    > able to surf through the site and/or go to other sites and so need an
    > independent address bar that does not take me away from the database
    > page to
    > be able to do this)


    > TIA
    > B




    What you need is a two column layout.
    Left column for the menu. Right column with an iframe.
    Or go full frames.
    Link the choices to the target frame and away you go.
    Richard, Feb 1, 2005
    #4
  5. Bill wrote:

    > To enter a url into the database means copying it from the real estate
    > page window and pasting it into an input box on the php page.


    You could write a bookmarklet to do that for you. Visit page; activate
    bookmarklet; confirm.

    <a
    href="javascript:document.location='http://example.com/add_site.cgi?url='+escape(document.location);">AddSite</a>

    > To view the real estate pages means doing the same in reverse - copying
    > from a list generated from the database and pasting it into the real
    > estate browser
    > (I have found this better than clicking on a link in that list to go to
    > the real estate site and then having to use the browser navigation to get
    > back to the php page and then click on another link)
    > It strikes me there has to be a smoother way of doing it.


    Most browsers have a facility to open new windows on request. Firefox has
    the nice "Middle click to open in new tab" option.

    --
    David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
    Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
    David Dorward, Feb 1, 2005
    #5
  6. Bill

    Bill Guest


    > What you need is a two column layout.
    > Left column for the menu. Right column with an iframe.
    > Or go full frames.
    > Link the choices to the target frame and away you go.


    Thank you Richard. Frames would make a neat solution. I specified that the
    right frame must be "surfable" so can you please tell me how I can display,
    (or the left frame can obtain,) the url of any page surfed to in the right
    frame?

    Bill
    Bill, Feb 1, 2005
    #6
  7. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "David Dorward" <> wrote in message
    news:ctncg8$28g$1$...
    >> To enter a url into the database means copying it from the real estate
    >> page window and pasting it into an input box on the php page.

    > You could write a bookmarklet to do that for you. Visit page; activate
    > bookmarklet; confirm.
    > <a href="javascript document
    > location='http://example.com/add_site.cgi?url='+escape(document.location);">AddSite</a>


    Thanks for this David. I have never come across bookmarklets before. I have
    looked into them now but am finding it confusing as to exactly how they work
    I would be grateful if you could break the code down, explaining what each
    element does in your one.

    > Most browsers have a facility to open new windows on request. Firefox has
    > the nice "Middle click to open in new tab" option


    Yep - Firefox is a great browser (on my system "open in new tab" is on the
    context menu opened by the right button).
    I am never going to get the others who use the database to switch from IE
    :(., but thanks for the suggestion.

    Bill
    Bill, Feb 1, 2005
    #7
  8. Bill wrote:

    >> <a href="javascript document
    >>

    location='http://example.com/add_site.cgi?url='+escape(document.location);">AddSite</a>
    >
    > Thanks for this David. I have never come across bookmarklets before. I
    > have looked into them now but am finding it confusing as to exactly how
    > they work I would be grateful if you could break the code down, explaining
    > what each element does in your one.


    document.location is the URL of the document being viewed.
    escape() urlencods it
    So it sends the browser to
    http://www.example.com/add_side.cgi?url=THE_ESCAPED_VERSION_OF_THE_CURRENT_URL.

    You then read that query string parameter as normal in your server side
    script.

    >> Most browsers have a facility to open new windows on request. Firefox has
    >> the nice "Middle click to open in new tab" option

    >
    > Yep - Firefox is a great browser (on my system "open in new tab" is on the
    > context menu opened by the right button).
    > I am never going to get the others who use the database to switch from IE


    Even IE has an Open Link in New Window feature on the content menu. I think
    it also activates if you hold down shift when you click the link.

    I'd just advocate Firefox harder; for the security implications if nothing
    else.

    --
    David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
    Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
    David Dorward, Feb 1, 2005
    #8
  9. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "David Dorward" <> wrote in message
    news:ctop73$ogg$1$...
    > Bill wrote:
    >

    <a href="javascript document
    location='http://example.com/add_site.cgi?url='+escape(document.location);">AddSite</a>
    >
    > document.location is the URL of the document being viewed.
    > escape() urlencods it
    > So it sends the browser to
    > http://www.example.com/add_side.cgi?url=THE_ESCAPED_VERSION_OF_THE_CURRENT_URL.
    >
    > You then read that query string parameter as normal in your server side
    > script.


    Thanks once again David. That is very clear.
    I have been working on it since I sent my earlier reply and have got the
    bookmarklet triggering my php page and storing the url in the database.
    It is a brilliant solution. Just what I needed :)

    Bill
    Bill, Feb 1, 2005
    #9
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