transitioning to modern C++

Discussion in 'C++' started by John Goche, Dec 14, 2011.

  1. John Goche

    John Goche Guest

    Hello,

    I have studied C++ in 2002, but it seems the language has undergone
    some changes
    in syntax and other additions since then. Could anyone please
    recommend
    a reference book which would facilitate the transition to a modern
    version of C++?
    I am looking for specific coverage of TR1 and threading which as I
    understand is now
    part of C++11. I am also interested in TR2 and boost, but specifically
    for the parts which
    are destined to become part of C++. I know some of the information can
    be found here
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C++_Technical_Report_1 but I would
    like a more
    in depth coverage with all the nitty gritty details.

    Thanks for your recommendations,

    Trying to keep up with times,

    John Goche
    John Goche, Dec 14, 2011
    #1
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  2. John Goche

    Jorgen Grahn Guest

    On Wed, 2011-12-14, John Goche wrote:
    >
    > Hello,
    >
    > I have studied C++ in 2002, but it seems the language has undergone some changes
    > in syntax and other additions since then. Could anyone please recommend
    > a reference book which would facilitate the transition to a modern version of C++?


    It depends on what you did in 2002 and what you've done since then.

    C++98 existed in 2002, but lots of people in practice wrote code which
    didn't use the standard library, exceptions, templates ... If you're
    not very familiar with those already, start there and don't worry too
    much about TR1 or the new standard.

    > I am looking for specific coverage of TR1 and threading which as I understand is now
    > part of C++11. I am also interested in TR2 and boost, but specifically for the parts which
    > are destined to become part of C++. I know some of the information can be found here
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C++_Technical_Report_1
    > but I would like a more in depth coverage with all the nitty gritty details.


    I'll pass here. Personally I'm waiting for a new edition of "The C++
    Programming Language", but its release date is a year into the future
    ....

    /Jorgen

    --
    // Jorgen Grahn <grahn@ Oo o. . .
    \X/ snipabacken.se> O o .
    Jorgen Grahn, Dec 14, 2011
    #2
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  3. John Goche

    Ian Collins Guest

    On 12/15/11 06:34 AM, John Goche wrote:
    >
    > Hello,
    >
    > I have studied C++ in 2002, but it seems the language has undergone
    > some changes
    > in syntax and other additions since then. Could anyone please
    > recommend
    > a reference book which would facilitate the transition to a modern
    > version of C++?
    > I am looking for specific coverage of TR1 and threading which as I
    > understand is now
    > part of C++11. I am also interested in TR2 and boost, but specifically
    > for the parts which
    > are destined to become part of C++. I know some of the information can
    > be found here
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C++_Technical_Report_1 but I would
    > like a more
    > in depth coverage with all the nitty gritty details.
    >


    Pete Becker's book "Standard Library Extensions" provides a good
    introduction to the TR1 extensions.

    --
    Ian Collins
    Ian Collins, Dec 14, 2011
    #3
  4. Suppose I have to deal with sets of items tagged as 0..255.

    And I have to check the union and intersection of sets that could
    contain repeated tags of items very often.

    The set library in the C++ template standard library
    is too slow in the run time.
    88888 Dihedral, Dec 14, 2011
    #4
  5. John Goche

    Ian Collins Guest

    On 12/15/11 10:52 AM, 88888 Dihedral wrote:
    >
    > Suppose I have to deal with sets of items tagged as 0..255.
    >
    > And I have to check the union and intersection of sets that could
    > contain repeated tags of items very often.
    >
    > The set library in the C++ template standard library
    > is too slow in the run time.


    Are you replying to me, or just posting more random nonsense?

    --
    Ian Collins
    Ian Collins, Dec 14, 2011
    #5
  6. On Thursday, December 15, 2011 5:57:10 AM UTC+8, Ian Collins wrote:
    > On 12/15/11 10:52 AM, 88888 Dihedral wrote:
    > >
    > > Suppose I have to deal with sets of items tagged as 0..255.
    > >
    > > And I have to check the union and intersection of sets that could
    > > contain repeated tags of items very often.
    > >
    > > The set library in the C++ template standard library
    > > is too slow in the run time.

    >
    > Are you replying to me, or just posting more random nonsense?
    >
    > --
    > Ian Collins


    Random nonsense just won't work fast.
    88888 Dihedral, Dec 14, 2011
    #6
  7. John Goche

    Lynn McGuire Guest

    On 12/14/2011 11:34 AM, John Goche wrote:
    >
    > Hello,
    >
    > I have studied C++ in 2002, but it seems the language has undergone
    > some changes
    > in syntax and other additions since then. Could anyone please
    > recommend
    > a reference book which would facilitate the transition to a modern
    > version of C++?
    > I am looking for specific coverage of TR1 and threading which as I
    > understand is now
    > part of C++11. I am also interested in TR2 and boost, but specifically
    > for the parts which
    > are destined to become part of C++. I know some of the information can
    > be found here
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C++_Technical_Report_1 but I would
    > like a more
    > in depth coverage with all the nitty gritty details.
    >
    > Thanks for your recommendations,
    >
    > Trying to keep up with times,
    >
    > John Goche


    Here are some notes about the C11 changes:
    On 8/12/2011 5:15 PM, Niels Dekker - no reply address wrote:
    > http://herbsutter.com/2011/08/12/we-have-an-international-standard-c0x-is-unanimously-approved
    >
    > Kind regards, Niels


    And Stroustrup likes it !
    http://www.softwarequalityconnection.com/2011/06/the-biggest-changes-in-c11-and-why-you-should-care/

    "Bjarne Stroustrup, the creator of C++, said recently that C++11
    “feels like a new language — the pieces just fit together better.”
    Indeed, core C++11 has changed significantly. It now supports
    lambda expressions, automatic type deduction of objects, uniform
    initialization syntax, delegating constructors, deleted and
    defaulted function declarations, nullptr, and most importantly,
    rvalue references — a feature that augurs a paradigm shift in how
    one conceives and handles objects. And that’s just a sample."

    "The C++11 Standard Library was also revamped with new algorithms,
    new container classes, atomic operations, type traits, regular
    expressions, new smart pointers, async() facility, and of course
    a multithreading library."

    Congrats and Thanks ! Looks like Visual Studio 2010
    already has a few of these:
    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2010/04/06/c-0x-core-language-features-in-vc10-the-table.aspx

    And gcc has several also:
    http://gcc.gnu.org/projects/cxx0x.html

    I'm still mulling over nullptr.

    Lynn
    Lynn McGuire, Dec 15, 2011
    #7
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