UTF-8 vs. iso-8859-1

Discussion in 'HTML' started by web_design, Aug 4, 2005.

  1. web_design

    web_design Guest

    What are the advantages and disadvantages of using either of the following?
    When I use utf-8 on one site, it first displays the site in Chinese
    characters on Netscape 4... only with that one site. It immediately
    switches back to English though...

    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">

    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
    web_design, Aug 4, 2005
    #1
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  2. web_design

    Toby Inkster Guest

    web_design wrote:

    > What are the advantages and disadvantages of using either of the following?


    The advantage of UTF-8 (which is a concrete representation of the more
    abstract "Unicode" set of characters) is that it has vastly more
    characters than ISO-8859-1.

    The advantage of ISO-8859-1 is that is enjoys slightly wider support than
    UTF-8.

    If you don't require the extra characters offered by Unicode, then go with
    ISO-8859-1.

    > <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
    > <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">


    You should use whichever META tag most accurately reflects the character
    set used by your page. That sounds useless and like I'm evading the
    question, but it really is the best possible answer. (Except to say that
    it's better to use a *real* HTTP header than this META tag.)

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
    Toby Inkster, Aug 4, 2005
    #2
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  3. web_design

    jb Guest

    UTF-8 will pass, 8859-1 will continue. Otherwise, they are practically
    the same.
    jb, Aug 4, 2005
    #3
  4. jb <> wrote:

    > UTF-8 will pass, 8859-1 will continue. Otherwise, they are practically
    > the same.


    You have no idea of what you are babbling about, have you? In that case,
    please continue using the same forged From line before you get a clue.
    Thank you in advance.

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
    Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html
    Jukka K. Korpela, Aug 4, 2005
    #4
  5. web_design wrote:

    > What are the advantages and disadvantages of using either of the following?
    > When I use utf-8 on one site, it first displays the site in Chinese
    > characters on Netscape 4... only with that one site. It immediately
    > switches back to English though...
    > <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
    > <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">


    news:alt.html is a group outside the regular Usenet hierarchy.
    It is carried by few servers - not by mine, for example.
    I suggest to post to the regular Usenet group
    news:comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html

    To your question:
    Read http://ppewww.ph.gla.ac.uk/~flavell/charset/checklist.html
    and http://www.w3.org/International/O-HTTP-charset.html

    If you have further questions, ask in
    news:comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html
    Andreas Prilop, Aug 4, 2005
    #5
  6. Toby Inkster <> wrote:

    > The advantage of UTF-8 (which is a concrete representation of the more
    > abstract "Unicode" set of characters) is that it has vastly more
    > characters than ISO-8859-1.


    That is true, but the repertoire of characters that you can use in an UTF-8
    encoded HTML document is exactly the same the one you can use in an ISO-
    8859-1 encoded document, namely UCS, the Universal Character Set, also
    known as the Unicode character set. The reason is that you can use
    character references like 〹 to overcome the limitations of the
    encoding.

    UTF-8 becomes advantageous with respect to ISO-8859-1 if you use _many_
    characters outside the ISO-8859-1 repertoire.

    > The advantage of ISO-8859-1 is that is enjoys slightly wider support
    > than UTF-8.


    Besides, ISO-8859-1 is more compact for most West European languages:
    it uses one octet per character, whereas UTF-8 uses two octets for any
    character in the upper half of the ISO-8859-1 repertoire.

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
    Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html
    Jukka K. Korpela, Aug 5, 2005
    #6
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