What is the difference of modelsim command run -continue and run -all

Discussion in 'VHDL' started by rxjwg98@gmail.com, Sep 5, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Hi,
    I am learning Modelsim XE 6.1e. Although I have read the manuals of
    modelsim and tried several times using some small programs (setting
    breakpoints, step, step over), I still cannot tell the difference of
    the option -all and -continue. Would you explain it to me? Thank you.

    Have a good day.
    , Sep 5, 2006
    #1
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  2. wrote:

    > Hi,
    > I am learning Modelsim XE 6.1e. Although I have read the manuals of
    > modelsim and tried several times using some small programs (setting
    > breakpoints, step, step over), I still cannot tell the difference of
    > the option -all and -continue. Would you explain it to me? Thank
    > you.


    run -a will run until there are no events anymore. So you should make
    sure that all clocks stop at a certain moment to make the simulation
    stop.

    run -c is mostly used after breaking (stopping) the simulator, e.g.
    after hitting a break point.

    If you say for example run 2 ms, and at some time a break point (or
    manual break) is hit, run -c will resume simulation and will stop
    where the original run 2 ms would have stopped (or of course the next
    break point).

    If the first run command was run -a, it does not make any difference
    whether you resume simulation after a break point with run -a or run
    -c.

    --
    Paul.
    Paul Uiterlinden, Sep 5, 2006
    #2
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  3. KJ Guest

    wrote:
    > Hi,
    > I am learning Modelsim XE 6.1e. Although I have read the manuals of
    > modelsim and tried several times using some small programs (setting
    > breakpoints, step, step over), I still cannot tell the difference of
    > the option -all and -continue. Would you explain it to me? Thank you.
    >
    > Have a good day.


    Let's say you did a 'run 1 us' and then stopped the simulation at say
    t= 532 ns for whatever reason by hitting the 'break'. You look at
    whatever you want to look at then decide to keep on going. If you do a
    'run -continue' the simulation will pick up where it left off and keep
    running until t=1us (i.e. the original time that you told it to run
    to).

    'run -all' keeps the simulation running until there are no signals
    scheduled to change state. Again, you can hit the 'break' key and
    interrupt and look at whatever you want to look at. In this situation
    though, when you go to restart the simulation 'run -continue' and 'run
    -all' are essentially equivalent because the original 'run' statement
    that you are trying to 'continue' said to run until there are no
    signals scheduled to change.

    KJ
    KJ, Sep 5, 2006
    #3
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