Who gets higher salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?

Discussion in 'Java' started by Sanny, Nov 22, 2008.

  1. Sanny

    Sanny Guest

    I have little experience in both Java and C++. I have designed a few
    programs in both languages.

    I get a lot confused as many times I use Java code in C++ and C++ code
    in Java.

    So I have descided to only work in one Language.

    Both C++ and Java has their importance.

    What language should I master. I just want to know who gets higher
    salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?

    Because Learning both creates confusions So I have to Choose the best
    among them.

    Whose future is better a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer? What
    else should I learn for a good Career. Should I learn C# which is very
    easy?

    How much max salary per Annum I can get If I become a C++ Expert.

    and How much max salary per Annum I can get If I become a Java Expert.

    Experts in fields, Please Advice.

    Bye
    Sanny.
    Sanny, Nov 22, 2008
    #1
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    Michael Sgier, Nov 22, 2008
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  3. On 22.11.2008 09:29, Sanny wrote:

    > What language should I master. I just want to know who gets higher
    > salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?


    IMHO this is the wrong question. You can achieve mastery in any of
    those languages and for any of those there are well paid jobs. If
    you're in the market for money only though, I doubt you have the proper
    motivation to achieve mastery.

    > Because Learning both creates confusions So I have to Choose the best
    > among them.


    There is no "best" language. Every tool has its strengths and
    weaknesses. The question would be "best for what?"

    > Whose future is better a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?


    You must imagine that the community as a form of crystal ball. I am
    afraid I have to inform you that this is not the case.

    > What else should I learn for a good Career.


    Define "good career".

    > Should I learn C# which is very easy?


    Without knowing C# too much I'd say this is a misconception. C# has a
    similar level of complexity at least as Java because it is object
    oriented and has a standard library of significant size AFAIK.

    Note also that knowing the syntax, constructs and library of a language
    not necessarily makes you an expert software developer. You also have
    to be aware of all sorts of design level practices that are quite
    independent of programming languages.

    > How much max salary per Annum I can get If I become a C++ Expert.
    >
    > and How much max salary per Annum I can get If I become a Java Expert.


    You would at least have to provide the bit of information in which
    region(s) you are willing to work.

    Cheers

    robert
    Robert Klemme, Nov 22, 2008
    #3
  4. Sanny

    James Kanze Guest

    On Nov 22, 9:29 am, Sanny <> wrote:
    > What language should I master. I just want to know who gets
    > higher salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?


    Neither. The commercial person who sells the final product
    makes the most money.

    > Because Learning both creates confusions So I have to Choose
    > the best among them.


    There is no "best", and if learning both creates confusions, you
    should probably look for a different profession; I regularly use
    four or five different languages (C++, Java, AWK, Unix
    shell...).

    --
    James Kanze (GABI Software) email:
    Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
    Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
    9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
    James Kanze, Nov 22, 2008
    #4
  5. Sanny wrote:
    > I get a lot confused as many times I use Java code in C++ and C++ code
    > in Java.
    >
    > So I have descided to only work in one Language.


    Poor choice. Most employers would rather employ the programmer who can
    utilize multiple programming languages over one who will choose to use
    but a single language.

    > What language should I master. I just want to know who gets higher
    > salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?


    Any difference in salary between the two would be dwarfed by other
    factors, such as seniority, etc. In other words, statistically speaking,
    neither.

    If you want to try for the big bucks, I hear COBOL is coming back in vogue.

    > Because Learning both creates confusions So I have to Choose the best
    > among them.


    There is no "best" language. For the most part, languages are
    fundamentally incomparable. Every single programming language has its
    strengths and weaknesses; the goal is to match up a programming language
    to the task.

    > Whose future is better a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer? What
    > else should I learn for a good Career. Should I learn C# which is very
    > easy?


    Ideally, you should be well-rounded as a programmer. This means you
    should be able to code in C/C++ and Java. You'll probably want some
    functional languages under your belt; Python and Perl are two good
    dynamic programming languages to tackle, although Ruby seems to be the
    next "hip" language. The list goes on.

    > Experts in fields, Please Advice.


    Another piece of advice would be to brush up on rules of punctuation,
    capitalization, and grammar in general.

    --
    Beware of bugs in the above code; I have only proved it correct, not
    tried it. -- Donald E. Knuth
    Joshua Cranmer, Nov 22, 2008
    #5
  6. Sanny

    Nico Guest

    Sanny wrote:
    > I just want to know who gets higher
    > salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?


    None of them.
    Programmer is the lowest level in the hierarchy of an IS
    In Europe, a baker has a better salary...
    Nico, Nov 22, 2008
    #6
  7. Sanny

    Lew Guest

    Sanny wrote:
    >> I get a lot confused as many times I use Java code in C++ and C++ code
    >> in Java.
    >>
    >> So I have descided to only work in one Language.


    Joshua Cranmer wrote:
    > Poor choice. Most employers would rather employ the programmer who can
    > utilize multiple programming languages over one who will choose to use
    > but a single language.


    Real programmers can do FORTRAN programming in any language.

    Sanny wrote:
    >> What language should I master. I just want to know who gets higher
    >> salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?


    Joshua Cranmer wrote:
    > Any difference in salary between the two would be dwarfed by other
    > factors, such as seniority, etc.


    Literacy, ...

    > In other words, statistically speaking, neither.


    Do you have evidence for those statistics?

    > If you want to try for the big bucks, I hear COBOL is coming back in vogue.


    Never went out of vogue.

    Sanny wrote:
    >> Because Learning both creates confusions So I have to Choose the best
    >> among them.


    If you are applying for jobs where English is a relevant skill, you will
    improve your earning power by increasing your mastery of that language.

    Non-programming skills often count for more than one's technical abilities
    when climbing the corporate rungs.

    Some might look at your random capitalization of different words in English
    and wonder if you are sensitive to case sensitivity in Java. It is a shame,
    perhaps, that your command of English might block someone's ability to
    perceive your command of programming, but that is a reality in the work world.

    Joshua Cranmer wrote:
    > There is no "best" language. For the most part, languages are
    > fundamentally incomparable. Every single programming language has its
    > strengths and weaknesses; the goal is to match up a programming language
    > to the task.


    Which is exactly what makes Java the best programming language.




    ;-) for those who insist on explicit irony markers.

    Sanny wrote:
    >> Whose future is better a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer? What
    >> else should I learn for a good Career. Should I learn C# which is very
    >> easy?


    You should, but it isn't easy.

    Joshua Cranmer wrote:
    > Ideally, you should be well-rounded as a programmer. This means you
    > should be able to code in C/C++ and Java. You'll probably want some
    > functional languages under your belt; Python and Perl are two good
    > dynamic programming languages to tackle, although Ruby seems to be the
    > next "hip" language. The list goes on.


    Sanny wrote:
    >> Experts in fields, Please Advice.


    Joshua Cranmer wrote:
    > Another piece of advice would be to brush up on rules of punctuation,
    > capitalization, and grammar in general.


    This is not parochialism, but a necessity when one is forced to communicate in
    any language. It is vitally necessary in written communications; face to
    face, people will forgive accents and unusual constructions, but in written
    communication there is little tolerance for fundamental errors, and less
    reason for there to be any.

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Nov 22, 2008
    #7
  8. "Joshua Cranmer" <> wrote in message
    news:gg983k$k93$...
    > Sanny wrote:
    >> I get a lot confused as many times I use Java code in C++ and C++ code
    >> in Java.
    >>
    >> So I have descided to only work in one Language.

    >
    > Poor choice. Most employers would rather employ the programmer who can
    > utilize multiple programming languages over one who will choose to use but
    > a single language.
    >
    >> What language should I master. I just want to know who gets higher
    >> salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?

    >
    > Any difference in salary between the two would be dwarfed by other
    > factors, such as seniority, etc. In other words, statistically speaking,
    > neither.

    [ SNIP ]

    I'd have to agree. Once you factor out the general state of the economy
    (i.e. are IT employers hurting for developers or is there a surfeit of
    developers?) and the effects of geography (i.e. your salary is influenced
    very heavily by where you live), I can't think of a market I've been in
    where I sensed that developers in one of the following groups - Java/J2EE,
    C#/.NET, or C/C++ - were paid significantly more or less than their peers in
    the other two.

    As an individual, _who_ you work for is the other major factor besides
    seniority in determining compensation. Are you a consultant/contract
    programmer? Do you work as an employee of a private software house? Or do
    you work for the government?

    Seniority and ability are intertwined, and feature in varying proportions as
    factors in determining salary depending on who you work for.

    AHS
    Arved Sandstrom, Nov 22, 2008
    #8
  9. Sanny

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 00:29:12 -0800 (PST), Sanny
    <> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who
    said :

    >What language should I master. I just want to know who gets higher
    >salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?


    To me that would be well down on my list of considerations. I ask
    questions like this:

    1. which language do I enjoy coding more? What counts is how much I
    enjoy my life. I spend a LOT of it coding.

    2. which language will let me tackle more interesting projects. For
    than reason COBOL is out. I have no interested in maintaining payroll
    programs. If I wanted to make money, I would learn the arcane art of
    Unix system administration.

    3. Which language will leave my options open where I work. I don't
    want to get stuck in some place I hate. I want to be able to go
    anywhere. Which language is become more accepted. Which are becoming
    obsolete?

    4. Which languages offer work from home?


    --
    Roedy Green Canadian Mind Products
    http://mindprod.com
    Your old road is
    Rapidly agin'.
    Please get out of the new one
    If you can't lend your hand
    For the times they are a-changin'.
    Roedy Green, Nov 22, 2008
    #9
  10. Sanny

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    Sanny wrote:
    > I have little experience in both Java and C++. I have designed a few
    > programs in both languages.
    >
    > I get a lot confused as many times I use Java code in C++ and C++ code
    > in Java.
    >
    > So I have descided to only work in one Language.
    >
    > Both C++ and Java has their importance.
    >
    > What language should I master. I just want to know who gets higher
    > salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?
    >
    > Because Learning both creates confusions So I have to Choose the best
    > among them.
    >
    > Whose future is better a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer? What
    > else should I learn for a good Career. Should I learn C# which is very
    > easy?
    >
    > How much max salary per Annum I can get If I become a C++ Expert.
    >
    > and How much max salary per Annum I can get If I become a Java Expert.


    Salary depends on where work, your experience and your general
    programming skills (not language and technology specific).

    The languages and technologies you know should have much less
    impact on salary level.

    You should be aware that tools, languages and technologies comes
    and goes, so over a life long career you will have to work
    with multiples of those no matter what.

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Nov 23, 2008
    #10
  11. Peter Duniho wrote:
    > C++ is a somewhat lower-level language, while at the same time offers in
    > some ways much more complex behaviors than Java. Because of that, I'd
    > recommend learning Java first, just because it's likely to be somewhat
    > easier.


    It is much easier to learn Java than C++ as first language.

    But it is also much easier to go C++ -> Java than Java -> C++.

    So I am not convinced that learning Java first and C++ later
    is in total easier than learning C++ first and Java later.

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Nov 23, 2008
    #11
  12. Sanny

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    Joshua Cranmer wrote:
    > Sanny wrote:
    >> I get a lot confused as many times I use Java code in C++ and C++ code
    >> in Java.
    >>
    >> So I have descided to only work in one Language.

    >
    > Poor choice. Most employers would rather employ the programmer who can
    > utilize multiple programming languages over one who will choose to use
    > but a single language.


    I think the bad thing of focusing on only one language is the
    lack of perspective. Learning multiple languages gives a much
    better perspective on things.

    Job wise I think the majority either hires for a specific skill set
    or hire someone they think is bright enough to learn what is needed.
    Too few managers care about whether the new hire will be easy to
    move to another department/project that uses another language and
    what will happen in 5 or 10 years when the company changes
    technology.

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Nov 23, 2008
    #12
  13. Sanny

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    Roedy Green wrote:
    > On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 00:29:12 -0800 (PST), Sanny
    > <> wrote, quoted or indirectly quoted someone who
    > said :
    >> What language should I master. I just want to know who gets higher
    >> salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?

    >
    > To me that would be well down on my list of considerations. I ask
    > questions like this:
    >
    > 1. which language do I enjoy coding more? What counts is how much I
    > enjoy my life. I spend a LOT of it coding.
    >
    > 2. which language will let me tackle more interesting projects. For
    > than reason COBOL is out. I have no interested in maintaining payroll
    > programs.


    I am convinced that there are interesting projects in any language.

    > If I wanted to make money, I would learn the arcane art of
    > Unix system administration.


    I am not sure Unix sys admin is arcane.

    > 3. Which language will leave my options open where I work. I don't
    > want to get stuck in some place I hate. I want to be able to go
    > anywhere. Which language is become more accepted. Which are becoming
    > obsolete?


    History shows that salaries are usually not bad for languages and
    technologies becoming obsolete. Sure demand goes down, but so does
    supply.

    > 4. Which languages offer work from home?


    Unlikely to be correlated with programming language.

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Nov 23, 2008
    #13
  14. Sanny

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    > Sanny wrote:
    >> How much max salary per Annum I can get If I become a C++ Expert.
    >>
    >> and How much max salary per Annum I can get If I become a Java Expert.

    >
    > Salary depends on where work, your experience and your general
    > programming skills (not language and technology specific).
    >
    > The languages and technologies you know should have much less
    > impact on salary level.


    The only specific skill set that seems to have an
    above average salary level is SAP knowledge !

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Nov 23, 2008
    #14
  15. Peter Duniho wrote:
    > On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 17:43:35 -0800, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    >> But it is also much easier to go C++ -> Java than Java -> C++.

    >
    > I'm not sure of that. I've seen a lot of people get frustrated and
    > tripped up by differences between the languages when they try to move
    > from C++ to Java.


    From observation of other students in classes (my school's curriculum,
    like most, started with Java), the single biggest trouble people had in
    trying to learn C/C++ was pointers. Classes never got around to
    templates (then again, the introductory courses barely covered generics
    and presumably ignored all the new features in Java 5 [1]), so I can't
    say how much that would cause people to struggle. I have also
    observed--with a different group of people, so the results aren't really
    comparable--that some people also tend to struggle with Java's
    pass-by-value and how it affects Object references.

    To me, it seems like someone going from C++ to Java would be able to
    quickly understand that an Object in Java is roughly equivalent to
    Object* in C++, more quickly than the people going the other way to
    learn pointers. The inequivalence of char[] and String may also snag
    some people, but I'm not sure how hard people would find it.

    >> So I am not convinced that learning Java first and C++ later
    >> is in total easier than learning C++ first and Java later.

    >
    > I'm not convinced that there's a clear advantage one way or the other.
    > I think there will always been room for equivocation, given the vast
    > variability of programming students.


    In other words: The average difference in skill level between learning
    Java then C++ and learning C++ then Java is less than the standard
    variability in learning the two languages?

    > But, inasmuch as there may be a measurable difference, I do know which
    > will get a person programming productively sooner (Java). In additon,
    > there will still be advantages to learning and using C++ later, but the
    > fundamental OOP principles will be easier to learn in the context of the
    > simpler, stricter language than in the more complex, more difficult one.


    One theory that has been espoused is to start people off of neither--my
    university does the first course in Python and my high school considered
    it. I can't speak if it has any benefits, though.

    [1] This is speculation since I skipped all introductory CS courses. I
    cannot say for certain the content of anything below a Data Structures &
    Algorithms course. On the other hand, my observations of classmates are
    all going to be for people intent on continuing programming (my school
    required the introductory course).

    --
    Beware of bugs in the above code; I have only proved it correct, not
    tried it. -- Donald E. Knuth
    Joshua Cranmer, Nov 23, 2008
    #15
  16. "Peter Duniho" <> writes:

    > I've seen a lot of people get frustrated and
    > tripped up by differences between the languages when they try to move
    > from C++ to Java.


    I think that can be more generalized though - people tend to get
    frustrated and tripped up when they move from their first language to
    their second. They don't have the breadth of experience they need to
    understand the difference between concepts and syntax.

    Additional languages beyond that tend to be much easier.

    sherm--

    --
    My blog: http://shermspace.blogspot.com
    Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
    Sherm Pendley, Nov 23, 2008
    #16
  17. Sanny wrote:

    > What language should I master. I just want to know who gets higher
    > salary a Java Programmer or a C++ Programmer?


    COBOL makes the most, I hear.
    Matthias Buelow, Nov 23, 2008
    #17
  18. On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 20:51:14 -0500, Arne Vajhøj wrote:

    > Job wise I think the majority either hires for a specific skill set or
    > hire someone they think is bright enough to learn what is needed. Too
    > few managers care about whether the new hire will be easy to move to
    > another department/project that uses another language and what will
    > happen in 5 or 10 years when the company changes technology.
    >

    IME that's nothing to do with the manager who needs the new hire: the
    initial hiring task gets given to HR who know nothing about programming
    or programming skills but do know how to match acronyms and names on the
    manager's skills list with those on a CV. The same applies to recruitment
    agencies. The result is that the candidates who get interviewed are
    simply those whose CVs get the most hits from what's little more than a
    clerical matching exercise.

    IOW the manager may know what he wants in the way of transferrable skills
    but this gets dropped on the floor by the agency and HR people because
    they don't understand IT. The current habit of condensing CVs to one or
    two pages and concentrating only on recent experience just exacerbates
    the problem.


    --
    martin@ | Martin Gregorie
    gregorie. | Essex, UK
    org |
    Martin Gregorie, Nov 23, 2008
    #18
  19. Ken T. wrote:
    > On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 15:42:04 -0800, Roedy Green wrote:
    >> 4. Which languages offer work from home?

    >
    > I've got to ask.. I've tried this alternative using places like Guru.com
    > to get jobs and I've found I just can't make any money and the clients
    > are not the kind of clients you want. They want a lot of work for very
    > little money.. even work for free in some cases. I want to make my
    > clients happy, but I need to get paid for my time and this just doesn't
    > seem to work out well.
    >
    > How do you get jobs where you get to work from home without having to
    > charge the same rates a person in Deli will charge.


    Well as you have noticed then rentacoder/elance/guru/whatever
    is not the place to go.

    Find a big company that have found out that office space is
    expensive !

    Arne
    Arne Vajhøj, Nov 23, 2008
    #19
  20. Sanny

    Sanny Guest

    > I've got to ask.. I've tried this alternative using places like Guru.com
    > to get jobs and I've found I just can't make any money and the clients
    > are not the kind of clients you want.  They want a lot of work for very
    > little money.. even work for free in some cases.  I want to make my
    > clients happy, but I need to get paid for my time and this just doesn't
    > seem to work out well.


    At these places only small companies or business owners come. And big
    company with years work contact developing companies directly.

    At http://www.GetClub.com/Experts.php you can tell your expertise and
    get work from home work. You only get small orders in such places. As
    large work people choose already established companies instead of
    giving work to strangers who may spoil the work.

    Bye
    Sanny
    Sanny, Nov 23, 2008
    #20
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