wondering

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by jkost44@comcast.net, Jul 28, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Does anybody know what ///. is. A lot of my files have this.
     
    , Jul 28, 2006
    #1
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  2. writes:
    > Does anybody know what ///. is. A lot of my files have this.


    It looks very much, like three '/' characters followed by a single '.'
    character.

    In C90, it's a syntax error unless it appears within a comment or a
    string literal (or conceivably a character constant or header name).

    In C99, or in code to be compiled with a C90 compiler that implements
    "//" comments as an extension, it's the beginning of an end-of-line
    comment whose first two characters are '/' and '.', unless [see
    previous pararaph].

    Any meaning depends on something other than the C language.

    Somehow I doubt that that really answers your question. If you need
    more information, you'll have to provide more information.

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
    We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
     
    Keith Thompson, Jul 28, 2006
    #2
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  3. Guest

    wrote:
    > Does anybody know what ///. is. A lot of my files have this. When I look at my history and open my computer, some files have file:///C:/Program Files/MSOE.TXT This is one example. Could these files be corrupt?
     
    , Jul 28, 2006
    #3
  4. In article <>,
    <> wrote:

    > wrote:
    >> Does anybody know what ///. is. A lot of my files have this. When I look at my history and open my computer, some files have file:///C:/Program Files/MSOE.TXT This is one example. Could these files be corrupt?


    The file: is important in that context. file:///. would indicate
    a URI type of file. Then // to indicate that the URI is absolute
    instead of relative. That is followed by the hostname terminated
    by a slash: since there is nothing in there before that terminating
    slash, the meaning is the empty hostname which means "localhost".
    The part after that the local part (relative to the host which is
    your local host in this case), and the . there indicates "current
    directory".

    Note that interpretation of filenames is not part of the C standard.

    Similarily, on your system, probably the system interprets

    file:///C:/Program Files/MSOE.TXT

    as indicating a file, with an absolute path given, the path being
    on the local computer (the /// part), and on that computer the
    disk is C: and the directory is "Program Files" and the filename
    within that directory is MSOE.TXT .


    > Could these files be corrupt?


    That's a loaded question. It's obviously an MS Windows filename
    reference, and there are some people who would say loudly
    that everything having to do with MS Windows is corrupt. ;-)
    But the entries look completely plausible for MS Windows.
    --
    I was very young in those days, but I was also rather dim.
    -- Christopher Priest
     
    Walter Roberson, Jul 28, 2006
    #4
  5. Guest

    wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > Does anybody know what ///. is. A lot of my files have this. When I look at my history and open my computer, some files have file:///C:/Program Files/MSOE.TXT This is one example. Could these files be corrupt?
     
    , Jul 28, 2006
    #5
  6. writes:
    > wrote:
    >> Does anybody know what ///. is. A lot of my files have this. When I look at my history and open my computer, some files have file:///C:/Program Files/MSOE.TXT This is one example. Could these files be corrupt?


    That looks like a URL referring to a local file on the hard drive on a
    Windows system. (You originally wrote "///.", but the example you
    showed in your followup just has "///" with no immediately following
    ".".)

    It has nothing whatever to do with the C programming language, which
    is what we discuss in this newsgroup.

    You might try comp.os.ms-windows.misc. But first, I recommend reading
    <http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html>.

    --
    Keith Thompson (The_Other_Keith) <http://www.ghoti.net/~kst>
    San Diego Supercomputer Center <*> <http://users.sdsc.edu/~kst>
    We must do something. This is something. Therefore, we must do this.
     
    Keith Thompson, Jul 28, 2006
    #6
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