You don't wanna be known as a loser, do ya?

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Neal, Nov 30, 2004.

  1. Neal

    Neal Guest

    Neal, Nov 30, 2004
    #1
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  2. In article <>, Neal
    () dropped a +5 bundle of words...

    > [http://www.geocities.com/johnniemccoy/howtogetawebsite.html]
    >
    > Oh my. Visit, read, mock.
    >


    It's pretty insulting for a guy who wants to get people to come to him
    for site design.

    --
    Starshine Moonbeam
    mhm31x9 Smeeter#29 WSD#30
    sTaRShInE_mOOnBeAm aT HoTmAil dOt CoM
     
    Starshine Moonbeam, Nov 30, 2004
    #2
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  3. Neal

    rf Guest

    rf, Nov 30, 2004
    #3
  4. Neal

    tm Guest

    Neal <> wrote:

    > <http://www.geocities.com/johnniemccoy/howtogetawebsite.html>
    >
    > Oh my. Visit, read, mock.


    From that site-
    Your GulfComp website is designed to produce the results you expect
    from your web presence.
    <http://www.gulfcomp.com/>
     
    tm, Nov 30, 2004
    #4
  5. Neal

    Neal Guest

    On Tue, 30 Nov 2004 01:50:04 GMT, rf <rf@.invalid> wrote:

    > Neal wrote:
    >
    >> [http://www.geocities.com/johnniemccoy/howtogetawebsite.html]

    >
    > Use < and >, not [ and ]. <> makes the URL clickable in a newsreader. []
    > does not, it makes it into plain text.


    What newsreader are you using? Never encountered that issue.
     
    Neal, Nov 30, 2004
    #5
  6. Neal

    Mark Parnell Guest

    Previously in alt.html, Neal <> said:

    > What newsreader are you using? Never encountered that issue.


    He's not using a newsreader, he's using OE. ;-)

    --
    Mark Parnell
    http://www.clarkecomputers.com.au
    "Never drink rum&coke whilst reading usenet" - rf 2004
     
    Mark Parnell, Nov 30, 2004
    #6
  7. Neal

    Duende Guest

    Duende, Nov 30, 2004
    #7
  8. Neal

    Duende Guest

    While sitting in a puddle Mark Parnell scribbled in the mud:

    > Previously in alt.html, Neal <> said:
    >
    >> What newsreader are you using? Never encountered that issue.

    >
    > He's not using a newsreader, he's using OE. ;-)
    >


    Pointing at Richard ROTFLMBO -------->

    --
    Duende (better now)
    If you wear a smile,
    they think you really know.
     
    Duende, Nov 30, 2004
    #8
  9. Neal wrote:

    > [http://www.geocities.com/johnniemccoy/howtogetawebsite.html]


    > Oh my. Visit, read, mock.


    Does anybody within the sound of my keys have a graphical browser that
    renders this page *without* various parts being superimposed over the
    top of others? Is this another IE-only page?

    http://www.geocities.com/johnniemccoy/index.html

    I tried: Firefox, Mozilla, Konqueror; Linux.

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263
    Play Zork: http://www.xs4all.nl/~pot/infocom/zork1.html
    SOME commands: get, open, drop, directions e/n/s/w, climb, up,
    down, look, read, inventory, hit/kill [object] with [object]...
     
    Blinky the Shark, Nov 30, 2004
    #9
  10. Neal

    Mark Parnell Guest

    Previously in alt.html, Blinky the Shark <> said:

    > Does anybody within the sound of my keys have a graphical browser that
    > renders this page *without* various parts being superimposed over the
    > top of others?


    Only if I make the text microscopic.

    > Is this another IE-only page?


    Considering it is just text, it'd have to be intentional. Surely?

    --
    Mark Parnell
    http://www.clarkecomputers.com.au
    "Never drink rum&coke whilst reading usenet" - rf 2004
     
    Mark Parnell, Nov 30, 2004
    #10
  11. Neal

    rf Guest

    Blinky the Shark

    > Does anybody within the sound of my keys have a graphical browser that
    > renders this page *without* various parts being superimposed over the
    > top of others? Is this another IE-only page?
    >
    > http://www.geocities.com/johnniemccoy/index.html
    >
    > I tried: Firefox, Mozilla, Konqueror; Linux.


    No, it's not IE only.

    They try though. Most of the text is in a very small number of pixels so IE
    out of the box does not display that over the top of other things. However
    <grin/> *some* of the page is not. It resizes. All over the top of the other
    stuff.

    I would think this site should be not just IE only but local file system
    only.

    --
    Cheers
    Richard.
     
    rf, Nov 30, 2004
    #11
  12. Neal

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Blinky the Shark wrote:

    > Does anybody within the sound of my keys have a graphical browser that
    > renders this page *without* various parts being superimposed over the
    > top of others?


    Works fine in Dillo/0.8.0 Linux.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Nov 30, 2004
    #12
  13. Neal

    jake Guest

    In message <glQqd.53093$>, rf
    <rf@?.invalid> writes
    >Neal wrote:
    >
    >> [http://www.geocities.com/johnniemccoy/howtogetawebsite.html]

    >
    >Use < and >, not [ and ]. <> makes the URL clickable in a newsreader. []
    >does not, it makes it into plain text.
    >

    [] -- Works just fine in my reader.

    regards.
    --
    Jake
     
    jake, Nov 30, 2004
    #13
  14. Toby Inkster wrote:

    > Blinky the Shark wrote:


    >> Does anybody within the sound of my keys have a graphical browser that
    >> renders this page *without* various parts being superimposed over the
    >> top of others?


    > Works fine in Dillo/0.8.0 Linux.


    True, nothing overlaps. (0.8.3 Linux) I didn't mention it because
    of its lack of CSS support, but yeah, I didn't make that clear in
    my question. It fares less well in the graphical version of links:

    http://blinkynet.net/screens/johnnie_links.jpg

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263
    Play Zork: http://www.xs4all.nl/~pot/infocom/zork1.html
    SOME commands: get, open, drop, directions e/n/s/w, climb, up,
    down, look, read, inventory, hit/kill [object] with [object]...
     
    Blinky the Shark, Nov 30, 2004
    #14
  15. jake wrote:
    > In message <glQqd.53093$>, rf
    ><rf@?.invalid> writes
    >>Neal wrote:


    >>> [http://www.geocities.com/johnniemccoy/howtogetawebsite.html]


    >>Use < and >, not [ and ]. <> makes the URL clickable in a newsreader. []
    >>does not, it makes it into plain text.


    > [] -- Works just fine in my reader.


    Okay here, too, in slrn, Pan and Knode (all Linux). They pick up on the
    form html://foo , and enclosing it in anything isn't required. Xnews is
    the same, in the Windows World. That aside, though, I think the
    convention on which /some/ news clients depend is angle brackets.

    --
    Blinky Linux Registered User 297263
    Play Zork: http://www.xs4all.nl/~pot/infocom/zork1.html
    SOME commands: get, open, drop, directions e/n/s/w, climb, up,
    down, look, read, inventory, hit/kill [object] with [object]...
     
    Blinky the Shark, Nov 30, 2004
    #15
  16. Neal

    Philip Ronan Guest

    Blinky the Shark wrote:

    > jake wrote:
    >> In message <glQqd.53093$>, rf
    >> <rf@?.invalid> writes
    >>> Neal wrote:

    >
    >>>> [http://www.geocities.com/johnniemccoy/howtogetawebsite.html]

    >
    >>> Use < and >, not [ and ]. <> makes the URL clickable in a newsreader. []
    >>> does not, it makes it into plain text.

    >
    >> [] -- Works just fine in my reader.

    >
    > Okay here, too, in slrn, Pan and Knode (all Linux). They pick up on the
    > form html://foo , and enclosing it in anything isn't required. Xnews is
    > the same, in the Windows World. That aside, though, I think the
    > convention on which /some/ news clients depend is angle brackets.


    Angle brackets are better. Strictly speaking the characters "URL:" should
    also be inserted, but most software seems to manage without it. See RFC
    1738:

    > In addition, there are many occasions when URLs are included in other
    > kinds of text; examples include electronic mail, USENET news
    > messages, or printed on paper. In such cases, it is convenient to
    > have a separate syntactic wrapper that delimits the URL and separates
    > it from the rest of the text, and in particular from punctuation
    > marks that might be mistaken for part of the URL. For this purpose,
    > is recommended that angle brackets ("<" and ">"), along with the
    > prefix "URL:", be used to delimit the boundaries of the URL.


    --
    phil [dot] ronan @ virgin [dot] net
    http://vzone.virgin.net/phil.ronan/
     
    Philip Ronan, Nov 30, 2004
    #16
  17. Neal

    Liz Guest

    In message <>
    Blinky the Shark <> wrote:

    > jake wrote:
    > > In message <glQqd.53093$>, rf
    > ><rf@?.invalid> writes
    > >>Neal wrote:

    >
    > >>> [http://www.geocities.com/johnniemccoy/howtogetawebsite.html]

    >
    > >>Use < and >, not [ and ]. <> makes the URL clickable in a newsreader. []
    > >>does not, it makes it into plain text.

    >
    > > [] -- Works just fine in my reader.

    >
    > Okay here, too, in slrn, Pan and Knode (all Linux).


    And on MessengerPro/RiscOS, so presumably also in Gemini (the Windows port
    of MPro).

    Liz
    --
    Virtual Liz now at http://www.v-liz.com
    Kenya; Tanzania; Namibia; India; Seychelles; Galapagos
    "I speak of Africa and golden joys"
     
    Liz, Nov 30, 2004
    #17
  18. Neal

    Toby Inkster Guest

    Philip Ronan wrote:

    > Angle brackets are better. Strictly speaking the characters "URL:" should
    > also be inserted, but most software seems to manage without it.


    Opera M2 likes <URL:http://example.org/> or <http://example.org/>. If you
    represent a URL like that, it will happily make it clickable, even if it
    line wraps. If you leave out the angled brackets, then you have to make
    sure the entire URL is on one line and is surrounded by some white space.

    --
    Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
    Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact
     
    Toby Inkster, Nov 30, 2004
    #18
  19. In article <>, Blinky the
    Shark <> wrote:

    > That aside, though, I think the
    > convention on which /some/ news clients depend is angle brackets.


    One of those is Newswatcher for the Mac. Ancient but wonderful. I've
    always used angle brackets.

    leo

    --
    <http://web0.greatbasin.net/~leo/>
     
    Leonard Blaisdell, Dec 1, 2004
    #19
  20. In article <>, Blinky the
    Shark () dropped a +5 bundle of words...

    > jake wrote:
    > > In message <glQqd.53093$>, rf
    > ><rf@?.invalid> writes
    > >>Neal wrote:

    >
    > >>> [http://www.geocities.com/johnniemccoy/howtogetawebsite.html]

    >
    > >>Use < and >, not [ and ]. <> makes the URL clickable in a newsreader. []
    > >>does not, it makes it into plain text.

    >
    > > [] -- Works just fine in my reader.

    >
    > Okay here, too, in slrn, Pan and Knode (all Linux). They pick up on the
    > form html://foo , and enclosing it in anything isn't required. Xnews is
    > the same, in the Windows World. That aside, though, I think the
    > convention on which /some/ news clients depend is angle brackets.


    Works on my Gravity.


    --
    Starshine Moonbeam
    mhm31x9 Smeeter#29 WSD#30
    sTaRShInE_mOOnBeAm aT HoTmAil dOt CoM
     
    Starshine Moonbeam, Dec 1, 2004
    #20
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