Edit webpage remotely


N

Neil Gould

Hi M,

Kabuki said:
I'm an html / css hobbyist. Was persuaded to set up a friend's
business "brochure" site.

Now he wants interactivity -- specifically would like to edit online
lists of clients, perhaps in some sort of spreadsheet form. The idea
is that his staff would update online lists of students for the
various first aid courses he teaches.

He doesn't want to deal with the html behind the scenes -- just the
text / data.

Is such a thing possible without programming? I don't want to learn
programming for just this guy.

I was wondering if there was some server-side solution. I have used
javascripts from script farms for some simple stuff. Is there a way to
accomplish this with javascript? Say download the file, edit and then
upload it again "invisibly"?

The other approach I'm thinking is to simply recommend one of the
many free file-hosting sites.

Or, perhaps someone knows of an online service that offers this?

Thoughts, suggestions?

M
The easiest way to manage this is to use a PDF file for the list. Link to
the PDF in the web page, and the revised list can be uploaded as often as
desired, with the only requirement being that the filename remain the same.
This solution is independent of browsers, and PDF readers are easy to come
by.

--
Best,

Neil Gould
Terra Tu Technical Publishing
www.TerraTu.com
 
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R

Raymond Schmit

I've downloaded some PDF maps -- all the time wondering why the &%#!
web designer didn't post the original graphic file.
Because, this file could have been created by an exotic graphic
program :)
 
J

Joy Beeson

Really? You've never downloaded and read some sort of non-text/html
document from an HTTP server?

I've downloaded some PDF maps -- all the time wondering why the &%#!
web designer didn't post the original graphic file.

Then there is, all too often, the PDF "document" that turns out to be
nothing but a scanned image that would have been much smaller -- and
easier to read -- in JPG, GIF, or PNG.

The protocol is _so_ underused.

Which one? HTTP? FTP? POP? VOIP?
 
J

Joy Beeson

Because, this file could have been created by an exotic graphic
program :)

What formats do scanners create images in?

Mine does JPG by default; I never inquired as to whether it does
another.
 
I

Irina Rempt

What formats do scanners create images in?

Mine does JPG by default; I never inquired as to whether it does
another.

Mine can at least do JPG, PNG and TIFF; don't have it attached to the
computer at the moment so I can't check. Its (or rather xsane's) default
is JPG too (unless it happens to be what I set it to last time and the
real default is PNG).

Irina
 
N

Neil Gould

Joy said:
I've downloaded some PDF maps -- all the time wondering why the &%#!
web designer didn't post the original graphic file.
Likely because the designer understood that most anyone would be able to
read a PDF on their system.
Then there is, all too often, the PDF "document" that turns out to be
nothing but a scanned image that would have been much smaller -- and
easier to read -- in JPG, GIF, or PNG.
If the designer was very knowleadgable of graphics, s/he may even understand
that a PDF could be significantly *smaller* than the original graphic for a
given resolution, especially considering that JPG, GIF and PNG are rather
compromised formats.
 
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N

Neredbojias

What formats do scanners create images in?

Mine does JPG by default; I never inquired as to whether it does
another.

Most scanners (and many cameras) can do lossless like .bmp, .png, .tiff,
etc., which is what I set them to use. Then I edit the thing with
graphics progs (or not) and convert it to a .jpg for easier transport.
 

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