Java monitor

Discussion in 'Java' started by Quantumuniverses, May 29, 2014.

  1. I deployed my app into my production server and now I'd like to monitor it
    to check memory, resources used , etc

    Any idea?

    I'm using JVisualVM (inside JDK) but I need something better..
     
    Quantumuniverses, May 29, 2014
    #1
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  2. Info I'd like to monitor:

    - number of classes loaded and threads running
    - Java VM uptime, system properties, and VM input arguments
    - threads
    - memory consumption
    - garbage collection stat
    - low memory detection
    - on-demand deadlock detection
    ....


    "Quantumuniverses" ha scritto nel messaggio

    I deployed my app into my production server and now I'd like to monitor it
    to check memory, resources used , etc

    Any idea?

    I'm using JVisualVM (inside JDK) but I need something better..
     
    Quantumuniverses, May 29, 2014
    #2
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  3. What does "better" mean? IOW: what are you missing in jvisualvm?

    Cheers

    robert
     
    Robert Klemme, May 29, 2014
    #3
  4. Quantumuniverses

    Roedy Green Guest

    Roedy Green, May 29, 2014
    #4
  5. Even if you enlarge the period of observation, you can't have all the time
    you want and moreover you can't store data collected.. (for example)

    And I was curious to know if there was a better software, if servers of big
    companies are monitored by JVisualVM or any other more professional
    monitor..
     
    Quantumuniverses, May 30, 2014
    #5
  6. If you want to record, there is jstat and options to write a GC log.
    And you can query various JMX beans. So a lot is available via tools
    coming with the JRE / JDK. And you'd be surprised how many enterprises
    use custom monitoring solution... :) Having said that there are
    probably tools around that promise professional monitoring of Java
    applications.

    Kind regards

    robert
     
    Robert Klemme, May 30, 2014
    #6
  7. Quantumuniverses

    markspace Guest

    I wouldn't overlook doing your own logging and reading log files. If
    you're interested in specific things, logging might be the best. Even
    if not, a good general suit of logs is a useful thing for any application.
     
    markspace, May 30, 2014
    #7
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