"Killed" Message On Linux (Running From BASH)

Discussion in 'Perl Misc' started by Hal Vaughan, Nov 16, 2005.

  1. Hal Vaughan

    Hal Vaughan Guest

    I've tried Googling this and get a high noise-to-signal ratio.

    I'm running Perl scripts on Linux (Debian, Sarge), from the command line (in
    bash), and I get a "Killed" message. I can't find enough to verify this is
    coming from Perl or bash or where. Sometimes the program runs fine,
    sometimes it doesn't. When I run it with one data file that didn't work
    before, it runs just fine the 2nd time. The only module I'm using that
    isn't mine is Term::VT102, and I've grep'ed and found NO occurance of the
    word "Killed".

    I'm used to getting crashes that tell me the line numbers and errors, but
    not just a simple "Killed."

    At the least, I'd like to know what is issuing this "Killed" message (is
    this what happens when another program kills a Perl script?), or what could
    be causing this.

    Thanks for any help!

    Hal
     
    Hal Vaughan, Nov 16, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. At the least, I'd like to know what is issuing this "Killed" message (is
    Some shells (e.g., bash) print this message if a process dies due to
    receiving a SIGKILL. Try this:

    In xterm 1, run:

    sleep 30

    In xterm 2, run:

    killall -9 sleep

    You'll probably see the message "Killed" in xterm 1. I'm not sure what
    would be causing this -- it is unlikely that something is sending
    spontaneous KILL signals to your processes, unless (a) you're running
    extremely low on memory and (b) the Linux OOM killer kills processes in
    this fashion.

    -- Lars
     
    Lars Kellogg-Stedman, Nov 16, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Large process running out of virtual memory?

    gtoomey
     
    Gregory Toomey, Nov 16, 2005
    #3
  4. Hal Vaughan

    Hal Vaughan Guest

    That was my first thought, but it's one Perl program, on 1.5 GB of memory,
    that had run before, a number of times, on a system with 1/2 that amount
    (and this system has fewer daemons and such running). I would also think
    if that were the case, running it under the same conditions every time
    would produce the same results. It doesn't.

    Hal
     
    Hal Vaughan, Nov 16, 2005
    #4
  5. Hal Vaughan

    Hal Vaughan Guest

    Aha!

    That's it. With that info, I tracked down a program that wasn't supposed to
    be running (I'm not finished testing it yet), that tracks down and kills
    certain programs if they don't register in a database first. Somehow a
    stray instance was still in memory, killing other programs.

    Thanks!

    Hal
     
    Hal Vaughan, Nov 16, 2005
    #5
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.