Modulus of a negative number

Discussion in 'C Programming' started by Jim Hunter, Feb 23, 2005.

  1. Jim Hunter

    Jim Hunter Guest

    Hello all,

    I have been reading K&R2, and it says that "the sign of the result for % [is]
    machine-dependent for negative operands." Does this mean that the absolute
    value of the result is guaranteed, but the sign isn't? Or does it mean that
    (for example) -100 % 3 == -1 on some machines and 2 on others? The latter
    behavior seems illogical to me, but I've been unable to find a definitive
    statement about this.

    Thanks in advance for satisfying my curiosity and for taking mercy on a
    newsgroup newbie. :)

    Jim
     
    Jim Hunter, Feb 23, 2005
    #1
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  2. :I have been reading K&R2, and it says that "the sign of the result for % [is]
    :machine-dependent for negative operands." Does this mean that the absolute
    :value of the result is guaranteed, but the sign isn't?

    No.

    : Or does it mean that
    :(for example) -100 % 3 == -1 on some machines and 2 on others?

    Yes.

    : The latter
    :behavior seems illogical to me, but I've been unable to find a definitive
    :statement about this.

    How were you thinking it could work with the absolute value being right but
    the sign possibly being wrong? A positive value for % means that many
    from the beginning; a negative value for % means that many from the end.
    When the result isn't exactly half-way inbetween, changing the sign gives
    a dfiferent meaning.
     
    Walter Roberson, Feb 24, 2005
    #2
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  3. No. C89 gives an implementation two options if either operand to / (or
    %)
    are negative: round up, or round down (this includes round to zero
    which
    is _required_ by C99.) In either case, if the result is representable,
    the following must hold...

    a == (a/b)*b + (a%b)

    Examples...

    5 / -3 == -2 and 5 % -3 == -1
    or 5 / -3 == -1 and 5 % -3 == 2
    It's sometimes useful mathematically for the modulus to always be
    positive.
    This, and round towards zero, are the only mechanisms that you are
    likely
    to encounter. C89 just happens to give an implementation 8 possible
    variations.
     
    Peter Nilsson, Feb 24, 2005
    #3
  4. Jim Hunter

    ruang

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    One simple example in which the positive number is more useful, is calculating time. For instance, if the current time is 1pm, and I want to figure out the time 2 hours ago, I would do the following:
    (1-2)%12 = -1%12 = 11
    which is the correct answer. In this case the answer of -1 does no good at all. The reason we want the positive answer in this case is because the time scale is cyclic from 0 to 12, no negative values. I would imagine many real-life examples in which some cyclic scale goes from 0 to some positive number, in which case would prefer to use the positive answer over the negative.
     
    ruang, May 4, 2010
    #4
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