Books on .Net

Discussion in 'ASP .Net' started by Gabriele, Jun 11, 2007.

  1. Gabriele

    Gabriele Guest

    I would like to learn .Net framework in order to develop an hybryd
    system.
    I do have solid knowledge of general programming with some languages.
    I may need information about:

    Desktop GUI programming on .Net
    Web Application development with Asp.Net
    Handling Database with .Net

    DBMS used is not yet decided, but i believe it will most probably be
    PostGreSQL as MS SQL Server cost a lot and does not provide anything
    new while MySQL miss important stuff.
    Language will surely be C# as i have an inner antipathy against VB
    style and i have a quite strong experience with C sintax (both in C++
    and Java).

    Could you suggest some good books to learn the above (possibly 2
    books, with the database components explained inside the others).
    About the style of the books I do prefere a content rich, professional
    approach (review of many components, explaination of inner workings,
    notes about security and performance) against a sample-code rich,
    basic tutorial approach (a few samples are appreciated thought).
    Gabriele, Jun 11, 2007
    #1
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  2. Gabriele

    Mark Rae Guest

    "Gabriele" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > I would like to learn .Net framework


    I suggest you start here: http://www.asp.net/Tutorials/quickstart.aspx for
    the ASP.NET stuff...

    > DBMS used is not yet decided, but i believe it will most probably be
    > PostGreSQL as MS SQL Server cost a lot and does not provide anything
    > new while MySQL miss important stuff.


    SQL Server Express is free: http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/sql/
    and the .NET Framework already comes with a free native .NET data provider
    for it (SqlClient).

    There is a free .NET provider for PostGreSQL:
    http://gborg.postgresql.org/project/npgsql/projdisplay.php but I've heard
    that it's not particuarly good...

    There are also commercial offerings: http://www.sqlsummit.com/DataProv.htm

    Do not even consider using OleDb or, even worse, ODBC...

    > Language will surely be C# as i have an inner antipathy against VB
    > style and i have a quite strong experience with C sintax (both in C++
    > and Java).


    If you have experience with C++ you will not find the C# syntax particularly
    difficult.

    However, the main learning curve will be the .NET Framework itself...


    --
    http://www.markrae.net
    Mark Rae, Jun 11, 2007
    #2
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  3. Gabriele

    Gabriele Guest

    > > DBMS used is not yet decided, but i believe it will most probably be
    > > PostGreSQL as MS SQL Server cost a lot and does not provide anything
    > > new while MySQL miss important stuff.

    >
    > SQL Server Express is free:http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/sql/
    > and the .NET Framework already comes with a free native .NET data provider
    > for it (SqlClient).


    I may consider it but SQL Server Express is probably not suitable for
    medium to high load so it is going to be nice for testing and
    development but probably won't be enough for deployment (maybe just at
    the beginning).
    I should take a look at the impact on the hosting costs for a SQL
    Server service.

    Anyway, the native .Net data provider for SQL Server should be quite
    good, i wonder.

    > There is a free .NET provider for PostGreSQL:http://gborg.postgresql.org/project/npgsql/projdisplay.phpbut I've heard
    > that it's not particuarly good...


    Good to know.

    > Do not even consider using OleDb or, even worse, ODBC...


    Is it so bad? I didn't know.
    Gabriele, Jun 11, 2007
    #3
  4. Gabriele

    Mark Rae Guest

    "Gabriele" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > I may consider it but SQL Server Express is probably not suitable


    There's no doubt at all that you (don't) get what you (don't) pay for:
    http://www.microsoft.com/sql/prodinfo/features/compare-features.mspx
    http://www.microsoft.com/sql/editions/express/features.mspx
    http://searchsqlserver.techtarget.com/tip/1,289483,sid87_gci1082707,00.html
    http://www.teratrax.com/articles/sql_server_2005_express.html

    > nice for testing and development


    I use this: http://www.microsoft.com/sql/editions/developer/default.mspx

    > Anyway, the native .Net data provider for SQL Server should be quite
    > good


    Well, it's made by the same people who make the operating system, the .NET
    Framework and the RDBMS itself... :)

    >> Do not even consider using OleDb or, even worse, ODBC...

    >
    > Is it so bad? I didn't know.


    Performance is the main drawback - a native .NET data provider (especially
    SqlClient) talks directly to TDS, thereby bypassing all the layers that
    OleDb and especially ODBC have to use...


    --
    http://www.markrae.net
    Mark Rae, Jun 11, 2007
    #4
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