Congratulations

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Tim W, Aug 24, 2012.

  1. Tim W

    Tim W Guest

    Congratulations to me that is.

    Greatly encouraged by someone here who said a few weeks ago that most
    professional web designers can't even read their own code I have gone
    pro as a web designer, adding it to my portfolio of half a dozen part
    time off-and-on trades and professions with which I hope to continue to
    fend off the spectre of commuting into town for full time employment.

    I am not showing you my site. I don't think I want it criticised in this
    instance but thank you for your ongoing help and advice - I will need
    plenty more now I have to pretend to be super competent.

    Tim W
    Tim W, Aug 24, 2012
    #1
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  2. On Fri, 24 Aug 2012 10:48:00 +0100, Tim W <>
    wrote:

    >Congratulations to me that is.
    >
    >Greatly encouraged by someone here who said a few weeks ago that most
    >professional web designers can't even read their own code I have gone
    >pro as a web designer, adding it to my portfolio of half a dozen part
    >time off-and-on trades and professions with which I hope to continue to
    >fend off the spectre of commuting into town for full time employment.
    >
    >I am not showing you my site. I don't think I want it criticised in this
    >instance but thank you for your ongoing help and advice - I will need
    >plenty more now I have to pretend to be super competent.


    I am fighting that battle, too, on several fronts: HTML, CSS,
    JavaScript, SQL Server, and the glue between browser and SQL Server.
    It is tough with not nearly enough easily-accessible and accurate
    information. Though they are not a total solution, newsgroups help
    considerably. Thank you people who have answered newbies' questions.

    Sincerely,

    Gene Wirchenko
    Gene Wirchenko, Aug 24, 2012
    #2
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  3. Tim W

    richard Guest

    On Fri, 24 Aug 2012 10:48:00 +0100, Tim W wrote:

    > Congratulations to me that is.
    >
    > Greatly encouraged by someone here who said a few weeks ago that most
    > professional web designers can't even read their own code I have gone
    > pro as a web designer, adding it to my portfolio of half a dozen part
    > time off-and-on trades and professions with which I hope to continue to
    > fend off the spectre of commuting into town for full time employment.
    >
    > I am not showing you my site. I don't think I want it criticised in this
    > instance but thank you for your ongoing help and advice - I will need
    > plenty more now I have to pretend to be super competent.
    >
    > Tim W


    At this stage you are still an amateur. Putting out a shingle and charging
    for your services does not make you a porfessional. To become a tru pro,
    you need to have a solid track record.

    When your customer hires you now, can you crank his new website out, as he
    wants it in a matter of days? A week later when he calls and says he says
    nothing, he will take his business elsewhere.
    richard, Aug 24, 2012
    #3
  4. Tim W

    dorayme Guest

    In article <13za5ex0eb33w.w0fucjphssrg$>,
    richard <> wrote:
    ....
    > Putting out a shingle and charging
    > for your services does not make you a porfessional. To become a tru pro,
    > you need to have a solid track record.
    >
    > When your customer hires you now, can you crank his new website out, as he
    > wants it in a matter of days? A week later when he calls and says he says
    > nothing, he will take his business elsewhere.


    Not my experience at all. Sometimes with some big sites, it has taken
    me months, some but not all of the delays due to slow supply of info
    from clients.

    A lot of nonsense is spoken about "professionalism", some of the
    delays from my clients has not tempted me to label *them*
    unprofessional and it is hardly fair to label a web developer taking
    longer than a few days to get a good big site together
    "unprofessional" even if he or she has all the raw inputs.

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Aug 25, 2012
    #4
  5. Tim W

    richard Guest

    On Sat, 25 Aug 2012 10:42:39 +1000, dorayme wrote:

    > In article <13za5ex0eb33w.w0fucjphssrg$>,
    > richard <> wrote:
    > ...
    >> Putting out a shingle and charging
    >> for your services does not make you a porfessional. To become a tru pro,
    >> you need to have a solid track record.
    >>
    >> When your customer hires you now, can you crank his new website out, as he
    >> wants it in a matter of days? A week later when he calls and says he says
    >> nothing, he will take his business elsewhere.

    >
    > Not my experience at all. Sometimes with some big sites, it has taken
    > me months, some but not all of the delays due to slow supply of info
    > from clients.
    >
    > A lot of nonsense is spoken about "professionalism", some of the
    > delays from my clients has not tempted me to label *them*
    > unprofessional and it is hardly fair to label a web developer taking
    > longer than a few days to get a good big site together
    > "unprofessional" even if he or she has all the raw inputs.


    Anyone can hang out the professional shingle at any time.

    As I was a truck driver, truckers are considered to be rookies for 3 years.
    I can teach you all you need to know about driving a truck in a day or two.
    It's going to take you 3 to 5 years to learn the rest of the business.
    Then another 3 to 5 years of hard knocks just might get you professional
    status.

    Web designing is quite similar. When is one truly called a professional?
    Hell if I know.
    richard, Aug 25, 2012
    #5
  6. Tim W

    Brian Cryer Guest

    "Tim W" <> wrote in message
    news:k17ik7$eac$...
    > Congratulations to me that is.
    >
    > Greatly encouraged by someone here who said a few weeks ago that most
    > professional web designers can't even read their own code I have gone pro
    > as a web designer, adding it to my portfolio of half a dozen part time
    > off-and-on trades and professions with which I hope to continue to fend
    > off the spectre of commuting into town for full time employment.


    Reading your own code is easy - the trick is being able to understand and
    maintain it 6 months or a year down the line when you've not been working on
    it regularly. Although frankly it's a lot easier with HTML & CSS than it can
    be with development languages, say PHP, JavaScript, Java, C# etc. Better
    still is to write such that someone else can easily pick it up and work with
    it.
    --
    Brian Cryer
    http://www.cryer.co.uk/brian
    Brian Cryer, Aug 29, 2012
    #6
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