Cross-platform standalone Ruby apps ?

Discussion in 'Ruby' started by Pieter Kubben, Sep 5, 2006.

  1. Hi,

    I am new here, experience with PHP and looking for a similar language
    that permits to do cross-platform programming of database driven apps,
    so that they run on Mac OS X, Linux and Windows from one codebase with
    some recompiling.

    Preferably relatively easy to distribute.

    Could Ruby work for this? And what would be the best database to go for?

    (I read about Ruby on Rails, might be a nice addition to my PHP
    knowledge but first I need to know the answer to my question above)

    Hope you can help me out!

    Pieter

    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    Pieter Kubben, Sep 5, 2006
    #1
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  2. Pieter Kubben

    Jamey Cribbs Guest

    Pieter Kubben wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am new here, experience with PHP and looking for a similar language
    > that permits to do cross-platform programming of database driven apps,
    > so that they run on Mac OS X, Linux and Windows from one codebase with
    > some recompiling.
    >
    > Preferably relatively easy to distribute.
    >
    > Could Ruby work for this? And what would be the best database to go for?
    >

    Sure. I am assuming you are talking about *gui* database apps. If so,
    I can recommend both FXRuby (although, last time I checked its OS X
    support was lacking) and RubyGtk2. Both have worked well for me in the
    past.

    There is also WxRuby and QtRuby, but I don't have any experience with
    either.

    Whichever you choose, be sure to use RubyScript2Exe to package
    everything up into one easy to distribute executable.

    As far as database management systems, you would need to give more info
    on your requirements before that could be answered. Ruby plays well
    with most every dbms.

    HTH,

    Jamey Cribbs
    Jamey Cribbs, Sep 5, 2006
    #2
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  3. Jamey Cribbs wrote:
    > I can recommend both FXRuby (although, last time I checked its OS X
    > support was lacking) and RubyGtk2. Both have worked well for me in the
    > past.
    >
    > There is also WxRuby and QtRuby, but I don't have any experience with
    > either.

    My personal preference is QTRuby. The widgets are "prettier" and there
    is an excellent book from the Pragmatic Programmers teaching exactly how
    it works! If you're on Linux, you can go a couple of steps further and
    build KDE applications with Korundum or Kommander.



    > As far as database management systems, you would need to give more info
    > on your requirements before that could be answered. Ruby plays well
    > with most every dbms.

    SQLite, MySQL, PostgreSQL, Oracle and MS SQL Server are supported for
    sure. I'm not sure about DB2.
    M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, Sep 5, 2006
    #3
  4. Jamey Cribbs wrote:
    > Pieter Kubben wrote:
    >> Preferably relatively easy to distribute.
    >>

    > Whichever you choose, be sure to use RubyScript2Exe to package
    > everything up into one easy to distribute executable.
    >


    I'd advise to use distribution-specific packaging for Linuxen. I get
    twitchy when I have to install an app that APT won't know about.

    David Vallner
    David Vallner, Sep 9, 2006
    #4
  5. David Vallner wrote:
    > Jamey Cribbs wrote:
    >> Pieter Kubben wrote:
    >>> Preferably relatively easy to distribute.
    >>>

    >> Whichever you choose, be sure to use RubyScript2Exe to package
    >> everything up into one easy to distribute executable.
    >>

    >
    > I'd advise to use distribution-specific packaging for Linuxen. I get
    > twitchy when I have to install an app that APT won't know about.
    >
    > David Vallner
    >
    >

    Which means you need at least a .deb and .rpm binary package, Debian
    source and RPM source, a pure source tarball for everyone else and a
    friend in the Gentoo community to make you an ebuild from the tarball.
    :) Makes gem look better and better with each word I type. :)

    Seriously, though, since I run Gentoo, I have similar problems. Gentoo
    has its own repository, and quite a few of the more popular gems are
    already packaged. Rails, rake, gem itself, of course, nitro, fxruby,
    qtruby, etc. are all in Gentoo.

    But if there's a gem I want that isn't in the Gentoo Portage tree, I can
    install it. Portage doesn't know it's there. I install source tarballs
    all the time; they usually go into /usr/local by default, which keeps
    them out of the way of the main distro which puts everything in /usr by
    default.
    M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, Sep 9, 2006
    #5
  6. M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:
    > Which means you need at least a .deb and .rpm binary package, Debian
    > source and RPM source, a pure source tarball for everyone else and a
    > friend in the Gentoo community to make you an ebuild from the tarball.
    > :) Makes gem look better and better with each word I type. :)
    >


    Gems aren't a bad choice either - the problem is that there Are Some
    Issues with applications in gems. At least there were with "resource"
    lookup, Trans' Facets couldn't find its default data / config files a
    while ago.

    I wonder if that kink was already ironed out.

    And with decent tool support, it can't be THAT hard to provide native
    packaging once you set up your environment right. Never tried though,
    I'll admit.

    > But if there's a gem I want that isn't in the Gentoo Portage tree, I can
    > install it. Portage doesn't know it's there. I install source tarballs
    > all the time; they usually go into /usr/local by default, which keeps
    > them out of the way of the main distro which puts everything in /usr by
    > default.
    >


    I mainly have problems with config file droppings since I already forget
    to purge debs instead of removing. And what with stupid me being a
    sucker for late development releases once I see a half-decent review...
    Well, let's say that Ubuntu Breezy -> Dapper Flight 5 package config
    file update bug that clobbered the resolver ("Argh, teh interwebz don't
    work!") was not particularly fun considering the "google for an answer"
    solution wasn't available.

    David Vallner
    David Vallner, Sep 10, 2006
    #6
  7. Pieter Kubben

    Trans Guest

    Pieter Kubben wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am new here, experience with PHP and looking for a similar language
    > that permits to do cross-platform programming of database driven apps,
    > so that they run on Mac OS X, Linux and Windows from one codebase with
    > some recompiling.
    >
    > Preferably relatively easy to distribute.
    >
    > Could Ruby work for this? And what would be the best database to go for?
    >
    > (I read about Ruby on Rails, might be a nice addition to my PHP
    > knowledge but first I need to know the answer to my question above)
    >
    > Hope you can help me out!


    Database: PostgreSQL
    GUI: Web (stand-alone via a webrick servlet)
    Trans, Sep 10, 2006
    #7
  8. Trans wrote:
    > Pieter Kubben wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I am new here, experience with PHP and looking for a similar language
    >> that permits to do cross-platform programming of database driven apps,
    >> so that they run on Mac OS X, Linux and Windows from one codebase with
    >> some recompiling.
    >>
    >> Preferably relatively easy to distribute.
    >>
    >> Could Ruby work for this? And what would be the best database to go for?
    >>
    >> (I read about Ruby on Rails, might be a nice addition to my PHP
    >> knowledge but first I need to know the answer to my question above)
    >>
    >> Hope you can help me out!

    >
    > Database: PostgreSQL
    > GUI: Web (stand-alone via a webrick servlet)
    >
    >
    >

    1. Rails also works with MySQL and SQLite, which in turn work on
    Windows, Mac and Linux

    2. I don't think *any* recompiling is required to use Ruby on Rails,
    though in some cases (Gentoo Linux, for example) you end up recompiling
    the Ruby installer and the database in the course of installing them.
    But you don't recompile any Rails code.
    M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, Sep 10, 2006
    #8
  9. M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:
    > Trans wrote:
    >>> Could Ruby work for this? And what would be the best database to go for?

    >>

    > 1. Rails also works with MySQL and SQLite, which in turn work on
    > Windows, Mac and Linux
    >
    > 2. I don't think *any* recompiling is required to use Ruby on Rails,
    > though in some cases (Gentoo Linux, for example) you end up recompiling
    > the Ruby installer and the database in the course of installing them.
    > But you don't recompile any Rails code.


    If I read all the comments, I doubt whether Ruby will be the right
    choice for me. However, I like the initiative, and perhaps it will turn
    out to be very useful in the future.

    For now I guess I'd have to focus more on Java, as Python does also not
    seem to deliver what I am looking for...

    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    Pieter Kubben, Sep 11, 2006
    #9
  10. On 9/11/06, Pieter Kubben <> wrote:
    > M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:
    > > Trans wrote:
    > >>> Could Ruby work for this? And what would be the best database to go for?
    > >>

    > > 1. Rails also works with MySQL and SQLite, which in turn work on
    > > Windows, Mac and Linux
    > >
    > > 2. I don't think *any* recompiling is required to use Ruby on Rails,
    > > though in some cases (Gentoo Linux, for example) you end up recompiling
    > > the Ruby installer and the database in the course of installing them.
    > > But you don't recompile any Rails code.

    >
    > If I read all the comments, I doubt whether Ruby will be the right
    > choice for me. However, I like the initiative, and perhaps it will turn
    > out to be very useful in the future.
    >
    > For now I guess I'd have to focus more on Java, as Python does also not
    > seem to deliver what I am looking for...


    I'm curious as to what you saw in the responses which made you think
    that Ruby isn't the right choice.

    I got three things out of the responses so far.

    1) some discussion based on the assumption that you were looking for a
    gui app rather than something else, e.g. a web app. Since you never
    responded to that, if it was a mis-assumption then don't assume that
    Ruby won't work for other types of apps.

    2) Statements that Ruby is pretty agnostic when it comes to a particular RDB.

    3) Statements that you normally don't have to recompile for different
    platforms. Was your requirement really that there be "some
    recompiling" that there be "some" recompiling?

    4) A side discussion over whether or not code for linux distributions
    should be packaged in a distro specific package format, and if so what
    tools to use for that. That's a separate discussion which is
    independent of whether you use php, ruby, java, or anything else.


    --
    Rick DeNatale

    My blog on Ruby
    http://talklikeaduck.denhaven2.com/
    Rick DeNatale, Sep 11, 2006
    #10
  11. On 9/11/06, Rick DeNatale <> wrote:

    > I got three things out of the responses so far.
    >
    > 1) some discussion ...
    >
    > 2) Statements that Ruby ...
    >
    > 3) Statements that ...
    >
    > 4) A side discussion over ...


    I wasn't conciously trying to imitate King Arthur in Monty Python's Holy Grail.

    Honest!

    --
    Rick DeNatale

    My blog on Ruby
    http://talklikeaduck.denhaven2.com/
    Rick DeNatale, Sep 11, 2006
    #11
  12. Rick Denatale wrote:
    > I'm curious as to what you saw in the responses which made you think
    > that Ruby isn't the right choice.


    I got the impression that GUI development was rather weak, and that the
    main focus lies on RoR. However, as I am looking for something to do
    desktop development and I understood that RoR is for web dev, I ignored
    the remarks on no recompiling for RoR (of course, webdev...)

    I need a decent GUI (could be done by scripting, perhaps) which allows
    to work with a standalone database, so no web connection involved...

    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    Pieter Kubben, Sep 11, 2006
    #12
  13. Pieter Kubben

    Joe Van Dyk Guest

    On 9/11/06, Pieter Kubben <> wrote:
    > Rick Denatale wrote:
    > > I'm curious as to what you saw in the responses which made you think
    > > that Ruby isn't the right choice.

    >
    > I got the impression that GUI development was rather weak, and that the
    > main focus lies on RoR. However, as I am looking for something to do
    > desktop development and I understood that RoR is for web dev, I ignored
    > the remarks on no recompiling for RoR (of course, webdev...)
    >
    > I need a decent GUI (could be done by scripting, perhaps) which allows
    > to work with a standalone database, so no web connection involved...


    Err, you don't need a "web connection" to use a Ruby on Rails
    application. Why do you think you do?

    Joe
    Joe Van Dyk, Sep 12, 2006
    #13
  14. Pieter Kubben

    Marc Heiler Guest

    If you go for a GUI, I'd give it to RubyGtk/Gnome. The bindings are very
    complete, the documentation is acceptable, there are more than enough
    examples provided, and what is the most important part, there are quite
    many people able to help you with it. :)

    However, and this is my personal opinion, FOX has a huge advantage for
    me, its that it can be installed easier (i just have to compile fox and
    fxruby for it to work).

    Ruby-Tk works out of the box but its so ugly that god kills a kitten
    every time someone creates a big app with it ...

    --
    Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
    Marc Heiler, Sep 12, 2006
    #14
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