Html format email

Discussion in 'HTML' started by shapper, Nov 7, 2008.

  1. shapper

    shapper Guest

    Hello,

    I am need to send a newsletter to my web site members. I would like to
    send it in Html format.

    1. What Doctype should I use?
    2. What else should I consider? Encoding, etc ...
    3. I think I should include the CSS in the Html itself right?
    Is there any considerations to the CSS I should use? Text format,
    etc ...
    4. The images should be on my web server and all images on the
    newsletter should have an url as follows:
    http://www.mydomain.com/Newsletter/Image1.jpg
    ...

    Thanks,
    Miguel
    shapper, Nov 7, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. shapper

    rf Guest

    "shapper" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am need to send a newsletter to my web site members. I would like to
    > send it in Html format.


    Don't. Send a plain text message pointing to the HTML newsletter on your web
    site.

    > 4. The images should be on my web server and all images on the
    > newsletter should have an url as follows:
    > http://www.mydomain.com/Newsletter/Image1.jpg


    Which may not be seen. Email clients (well mine anyway) ship with "don't
    display images" turned on. This is to stop spammers from determining that
    they have hit a valid email address by the fact that I try to download their
    images. No images (or anything else for that matter, including CSS files and
    JavaScript) means no phoning home.
    rf, Nov 7, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. shapper

    richard Guest

    On Fri, 07 Nov 2008 02:38:48 GMT, "rf" <> wrote:

    >
    >"shapper" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> I am need to send a newsletter to my web site members. I would like to
    >> send it in Html format.

    >
    >Don't. Send a plain text message pointing to the HTML newsletter on your web
    >site.
    >
    >> 4. The images should be on my web server and all images on the
    >> newsletter should have an url as follows:
    >> http://www.mydomain.com/Newsletter/Image1.jpg

    >
    >Which may not be seen. Email clients (well mine anyway) ship with "don't
    >display images" turned on. This is to stop spammers from determining that
    >they have hit a valid email address by the fact that I try to download their
    >images. No images (or anything else for that matter, including CSS files and
    >JavaScript) means no phoning home.
    >



    No images wouldn't stop them from knowing they've hit a good addy.
    The mere fact that it was accepted does.

    JS is turned on by default.
    I can't say for certain, but there may be a way of triggering some
    event to tell the sender that JS is off, ergo, valid addy.
    richard, Nov 7, 2008
    #3
  4. shapper

    rf Guest

    "richard" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Fri, 07 Nov 2008 02:38:48 GMT, "rf" <> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"shapper" <> wrote in message
    >>news:...
    >>> Hello,
    >>>
    >>> I am need to send a newsletter to my web site members. I would like to
    >>> send it in Html format.

    >>
    >>Don't. Send a plain text message pointing to the HTML newsletter on your
    >>web
    >>site.
    >>
    >>> 4. The images should be on my web server and all images on the
    >>> newsletter should have an url as follows:
    >>> http://www.mydomain.com/Newsletter/Image1.jpg

    >>
    >>Which may not be seen. Email clients (well mine anyway) ship with "don't
    >>display images" turned on. This is to stop spammers from determining that
    >>they have hit a valid email address by the fact that I try to download
    >>their
    >>images. No images (or anything else for that matter, including CSS files
    >>and
    >>JavaScript) means no phoning home.
    >>

    >
    >
    > No images wouldn't stop them from knowing they've hit a good addy.
    > The mere fact that it was accepted does.


    They don't know it was accepted. They just know it was not rejected.

    Many mail servers have given up rejecting spam. It just causes too much
    bounce traffic.

    >
    > JS is turned on by default.
    > I can't say for certain, but there may be a way of triggering some
    > event to tell the sender that JS is off, ergo, valid addy.


    How? With javascript?

    Besides I would never ever let an email client run Javascript.
    rf, Nov 7, 2008
    #4
  5. shapper

    Bergamot Guest

    richard wrote:
    > On Fri, 07 Nov 2008 02:38:48 GMT, "rf" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>Email clients (well mine anyway) ship with "don't
    >>display images" turned on. This is to stop spammers from determining that
    >>they have hit a valid email address by the fact that I try to download their
    >>images. No images (or anything else for that matter, including CSS files and
    >>JavaScript) means no phoning home.

    >
    > JS is turned on by default.


    Not in mail clients, it isn't. Even Outlook Express has it off by
    default these days. I believe web mail systems strip out JS by default,
    as well.

    --
    Berg
    Bergamot, Nov 7, 2008
    #5
  6. shapper

    dorayme Guest

    In article
    <>,
    shapper <> wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > I am need to send a newsletter to my web site members. I would like to
    > send it in Html format.
    >


    To this question from my clients, I always try to persuade them to,
    instead, make a webpage with the newsletter on it or make a PDF, and
    simply email the subscribers with the URL where the victims can see or
    download it.

    ....

    > 4. The images should be on my web server and all images on the
    > newsletter should have an url as follows:
    > http://www.mydomain.com/Newsletter/Image1.jpg
    > ...


    I have images for HTML emails turned off and though this saves me
    bandwidth, it looks bad and so still manages to irritate me. Believe me,
    a martian irritation is not like an earthling one. It is bad.

    For someone like you, who should be a wiz at making HTML pages by now
    considering your many questions and all the help you have received in
    the last year, your natural course is to make a web page. <g>

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Nov 7, 2008
    #6
  7. shapper

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>, Ed Mullen <>
    wrote:

    > rf wrote:
    > > "shapper" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> Hello,
    > >>
    > >> I am need to send a newsletter to my web site members. I would like to
    > >> send it in Html format.

    > >
    > > Don't. Send a plain text message pointing to the HTML newsletter on your
    > > web
    > > site.

    >
    > I see this all the time here. I think it's outmoded and silly.
    >
    > Yes, I understand some of you are on dial up.
    >
    > However, I've been sending an HTML newsletter to 250+ people since 2001.
    > I have not received a single complaint.
    >
    > Virtually all email I receive is HTML.
    >
    > People? It's almost 2009.


    OK Ed. But, you being a reasonable man, things are about to change for
    you from 2008 on. Here is one argument:

    Sending any number, n, of plain text emails with a link to a page of
    size, S, puts a whole lot less bandwidth strain on you than sending S, n
    number of times. It also beats hands down the resultant strain on the
    internet system because of the number of people who do not actually get
    to read/see or want to read/see the newsletter *that particular
    posting*.

    A text link unclicked is a much smaller footprint on a strained and
    crowded world than an unread but fully sent and loaded HTML email.

    There are other arguments but I will leave you to digest this one first.
    <g>

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Nov 8, 2008
    #7
  8. shapper

    Neredbojias Guest

    On 07 Nov 2008, Ed Mullen <> wrote:

    > Ed Mullen wrote:
    >> dorayme wrote:

    >
    >>> OK Ed. But, you being a reasonable man, things are about to change
    >>> for

    >
    > Much appreciated.
    >
    >> I hear you, and, as Bill Clinton was fond of saying: "I fell your
    >> pain."

    >
    > Oops! I meant "I FEEL your pain." Sigh. Fingers faster than brain.
    > Common ailment at my age.


    Ya forgot this one:

    "For those who live in areas where brodband is not..."

    :)

    --
    Neredbojias
    http://www.neredbojias.org/
    http://www.neredbojias.net/
    Neredbojias, Nov 8, 2008
    #8
  9. Gazing into my crystal ball I observed Ed Mullen <>
    writing in news::

    > rf wrote:
    >> "shapper" <> wrote in message
    >> news:c9c7741c-8936-4bb5-bf13-


    >> ...
    >>> Hello,
    >>>
    >>> I am need to send a newsletter to my web site members. I would like
    >>> to send it in Html format.

    >>
    >> Don't. Send a plain text message pointing to the HTML newsletter on
    >> your web site.

    >
    > I see this all the time here. I think it's outmoded and silly.
    >
    > Yes, I understand some of you are on dial up.
    >
    > However, I've been sending an HTML newsletter to 250+ people since
    > 2001.
    > I have not received a single complaint.
    >
    > Virtually all email I receive is HTML.
    >
    > People? It's almost 2009.
    >


    I use mailwasher which reads the headers and the first few lines of text
    - giving me a chance to see the mail before it is downloaded, and
    optionally to delete it.

    My boss loves to send HTML formatted emails that include a background
    graphic and a graphic in her signature. Even though we are on
    broadband, and on the same mail server, across the room from eachother,
    there is always a significant blip while waiting for the graphics on her
    emails. I have asked her repeatedly not to send HTML mail, but she
    thinks that everyone likes it.

    The newsletter we send out weekly goes out to 10,000+ people. I keep a
    very clean list - if you want out, you're out. If your mail comes back
    underliverable, you're out. We recently received an email from a
    recipient who is in the Iraqi war, and she said she really enjoyed the
    newsletter because it was a moral booster.

    The newsletter is sent multipart text and HTML. When I get this
    newsletter, since mailwasher only reads text, I get the text version,
    and then when I download it, I have the HTML version.

    That is the best solution, multipart - text for those who want text, and
    HTML for those who want HTML.

    --
    Adrienne Boswell at Home
    Arbpen Web Site Design Services
    http://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
    Please respond to the group so others can share
    Adrienne Boswell, Nov 8, 2008
    #9
  10. shapper

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>, Ed Mullen <>
    wrote:

    > dorayme wrote:
    > > In article <>, Ed Mullen <>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> rf wrote:
    > >>> "shapper" <> wrote in message
    > >>> news:...
    > >>>> Hello,
    > >>>>
    > >>>> I am need to send a newsletter to my web site members. I would like to
    > >>>> send it in Html format.
    > >>> Don't. Send a plain text message pointing to the HTML newsletter on your
    > >>> web
    > >>> site.
    > >> I see this all the time here. I think it's outmoded and silly.
    > >>
    > >> Yes, I understand some of you are on dial up.
    > >>
    > >> However, I've been sending an HTML newsletter to 250+ people since 2001.
    > >> I have not received a single complaint.
    > >>
    > >> Virtually all email I receive is HTML.
    > >>
    > >> People? It's almost 2009.

    > >
    > > OK Ed. But, you being a reasonable man, things are about to change for
    > > you from 2008 on. Here is one argument:
    > >
    > > Sending any number, n, of plain text emails with a link to a page of
    > > size, S, puts a whole lot less bandwidth strain on you than sending S, n
    > > number of times. It also beats hands down the resultant strain on the
    > > internet system because of the number of people who do not actually get
    > > to read/see or want to read/see the newsletter *that particular
    > > posting*.
    > >
    > > A text link unclicked is a much smaller footprint on a strained and
    > > crowded world than an unread but fully sent and loaded HTML email.
    > >
    > > There are other arguments but I will leave you to digest this one first.
    > > <g>
    > >

    >
    > I hear you, and, as Bill Clinton was fond of saying: "I feel your pain."
    >
    > However, I, and virtually all of my newsletter recipients, have no pain
    > in this regard. Bandwidth is a trivial matter. It continually becoming
    > a more trivial matter for more of the world every day.
    >
    > This nonsense of "strain on the Internet ..." is just silly. The
    > infrastructure is constantly being expanded.
    >
    > For those who live in areas where brodband is not prevalent and where
    > infrastructure is not being developed, I am sorry. But for most of us
    > in developed areas, it is simply not an issue.


    Well, it is not nonsense really you know! And it does not necessarily
    have everything to do with dial up or slow connections. Even if it all
    happened superfast, it would still be objectionable on energy
    conservation and other grounds.

    The pattern of the moral argument is a well known one.

    1. Fred, Mary and Justin ... doing A causes no harm
    2. Therefore it is ok for everyone to do A

    is a bad argument if harm is caused by a sufficient number of people
    doing A.

    Emails do not get sent by magic, electricity is used. That means coal
    mainly... and well, you can see where I am going...

    Ed, it is 2009 soon, after all! Time for more modern ways of thinking.

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Nov 8, 2008
    #10
  11. shapper

    rf Guest

    "Neredbojias" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns9B4FF22E4B832neredbojiasnano@194.177.96.78...
    > On 07 Nov 2008, Ed Mullen <> wrote:
    >
    >> Ed Mullen wrote:
    >>> dorayme wrote:

    >>
    >>>> OK Ed. But, you being a reasonable man, things are about to change
    >>>> for

    >>
    >> Much appreciated.
    >>
    >>> I hear you, and, as Bill Clinton was fond of saying: "I fell your
    >>> pain."

    >>
    >> Oops! I meant "I FEEL your pain." Sigh. Fingers faster than brain.
    >> Common ailment at my age.

    >
    > Ya forgot this one:
    >
    > "For those who live in areas where brodband is not..."


    Ya forgot this one:

    "for those who pay through the nose per *kilobyte* to receive emails on
    their telephone but need it check emails on the road but will happily wait
    until they get home to read a newsletter on a real computer".
    rf, Nov 8, 2008
    #11
  12. shapper

    Irina Rempt Guest

    On Saturday 08 November 2008 09:58, rf wrote:

    > Ya forgot this one:
    >
    > "for those who pay through the nose per *kilobyte* to receive emails on
    > their telephone but need it check emails on the road but will happily
    > wait until they get home to read a newsletter on a real computer".


    Also, "for those who get so much spam HTML email that it's easier to filter
    anything in HTML into the trash immediately because all serious
    correspondents know to use plain text".

    Irina

    --
    "Of course it is happening inside your head, Harry, but why on earth
    should that mean that it is not real?" --Albus Dumbledore
    http://www.valdyas.org/foundobjects/index.cgi Latest: 02-Nov-2008
    Irina Rempt, Nov 8, 2008
    #12
  13. shapper

    Neredbojias Guest

    On 08 Nov 2008, "rf" <> wrote:

    >>>> I hear you, and, as Bill Clinton was fond of saying: "I fell your
    >>>> pain."
    >>>
    >>> Oops! I meant "I FEEL your pain." Sigh. Fingers faster than
    >>> brain. Common ailment at my age.

    >>
    >> Ya forgot this one:
    >>
    >> "For those who live in areas where brodband is not..."

    >
    > Ya forgot this one:
    >
    > "for those who pay through the nose per *kilobyte* to receive emails
    > on their telephone but need it check emails on the road but will
    > happily wait until they get home to read a newsletter on a real
    > computer".


    I was just making a reference to the "brodband" (vs "broadband") in the
    note, not making a judgment about html email. Can see both sides to
    that story.

    --
    Neredbojias
    http://www.neredbojias.org/
    http://www.neredbojias.net/
    Neredbojias, Nov 8, 2008
    #13
  14. shapper

    Rick Brandt Guest

    dorayme wrote:
    > OK Ed. But, you being a reasonable man, things are about to change for
    > you from 2008 on. Here is one argument:
    >
    > Sending any number, n, of plain text emails with a link to a page of
    > size, S, puts a whole lot less bandwidth strain on you than sending
    > S, n number of times. It also beats hands down the resultant strain
    > on the internet system because of the number of people who do not
    > actually get to read/see or want to read/see the newsletter *that
    > particular posting*.
    >
    > A text link unclicked is a much smaller footprint on a strained and
    > crowded world than an unread but fully sent and loaded HTML email.
    >
    > There are other arguments but I will leave you to digest this one
    > first. <g>


    Interjecting for an opinion from the "plain text only" crowd. I don't think
    your arguments are without merit, but I do think your fighting a battle that
    you already lost several years ago.

    The question is how do your thoughts change for HTML messages that use HTML
    only for its formatting capabilities? Different fonts, some color, and
    tables that look and behave like tables. In other words nothing at all
    included that "phones home". Do you have the same objections?

    My apps generate Emails pretty regularly. Mostly intranet, but some go to
    the outside world and for many I use HTML because the requirements of the
    message make plain text look pretty awful. Links to a server resource would
    not work, because these are dynamically generated and don't get me started
    on attachments. With each passing month I become more convinced that
    eventually attachments will be abandoned completely. I just have too many
    that never arrive or which the recipient cannot open.

    I understand that I am still sending addditional characters, but I write my
    own markup so it is very clean. I don't think the overall size is affected
    that much. Certainly a plain text Email with a quoted reply would be larger
    than one of my HTML messages.

    Also, since most Email clients restrict downloading images unless the user
    "ok"s it, is the problem even for those cases really as bad as you describe?
    Rick Brandt, Nov 8, 2008
    #14
  15. Ed Mullen <> writes:

    > rf wrote:
    >> "shapper" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Hello,
    >>>
    >>> I am need to send a newsletter to my web site members. I would like to
    >>> send it in Html format.

    >>
    >> Don't. Send a plain text message pointing to the HTML newsletter on
    >> your web site.

    >
    > I see this all the time here. I think it's outmoded and silly.


    Agreed. It would be far better to accept the fact that many people don't
    mind HTML email, and give realistic advice - such as, send your email as
    multipart/mixed, so that those who prefer plain text can view it as
    such.

    sherm--

    --
    My blog: http://shermspace.blogspot.com
    Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
    Sherm Pendley, Nov 8, 2008
    #15
  16. Ed Mullen <> writes:

    > Ed Mullen wrote:
    >
    >> I hear you, and, as Bill Clinton was fond of saying: "I fell your pain."

    >
    > Oops! I meant "I FEEL your pain." Sigh. Fingers faster than
    > brain.


    Come to think of it, that was Bill's problem too... :)

    sherm--

    --
    My blog: http://shermspace.blogspot.com
    Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
    Sherm Pendley, Nov 8, 2008
    #16
  17. shapper

    dorayme Guest

    In article <TBhRk.5612$>,
    "Rick Brandt" <> wrote:

    > dorayme wrote:
    > > OK Ed. But, you being a reasonable man, things are about to change for
    > > you from 2008 on. Here is one argument:
    > >
    > > Sending any number, n, of plain text emails with a link to a page of
    > > size, S, puts a whole lot less bandwidth strain on you than sending
    > > S, n number of times. It also beats hands down the resultant strain
    > > on the internet system because of the number of people who do not
    > > actually get to read/see or want to read/see the newsletter *that
    > > particular posting*.
    > >
    > > A text link unclicked is a much smaller footprint on a strained and
    > > crowded world than an unread but fully sent and loaded HTML email.
    > >
    > > There are other arguments but I will leave you to digest this one
    > > first. <g>

    >
    > Interjecting for an opinion from the "plain text only" crowd. I don't think
    > your arguments are without merit, but I do think your fighting a battle that
    > you already lost several years ago.
    >

    It could be argued that there is no hope that the world will stop
    getting "unnecessarily" disastrously warm. We might have lost the battle
    before even trying! But should we be so pessimistic? <g>

    > The question is how do your thoughts change for HTML messages that use HTML
    > only for its formatting capabilities? Different fonts, some color, and
    > tables that look and behave like tables. In other words nothing at all
    > included that "phones home". Do you have the same objections?
    >


    In principle, the argument above relies only on the size of the emails.
    If everyone acted to make the smallest footprint while yet achieving
    their worthwhile goals, then the mere fact of HTML does not necessarily
    come into it. But the facts are mostly that HTML emails are fatter than
    plain text. And the argument, if you look at it carefully, depends on
    the crucial fact of the unread or unnoticed number of emails. If all
    emails were read carefully and all in them was perused by all who
    received them, then this argument against HTML emails would fail.
    Getting a plain text email and clicking to a real 'formatted' web page
    with or without pics would perhaps be no better than getting an HTML
    email in the first place.

    (But I have more arguments, don't relax! <g>)

    > My apps generate Emails pretty regularly. Mostly intranet, but some go to
    > the outside world and for many I use HTML because the requirements of the
    > message make plain text look pretty awful. Links to a server resource would
    > not work, because these are dynamically generated and don't get me started
    > on attachments. With each passing month I become more convinced that
    > eventually attachments will be abandoned completely. I just have too many
    > that never arrive or which the recipient cannot open.
    >
    > I understand that I am still sending addditional characters, but I write my
    > own markup so it is very clean. I don't think the overall size is affected
    > that much. Certainly a plain text Email with a quoted reply would be larger
    > than one of my HTML messages.


    Your last sentence is cooking the books... but never mind.

    >
    > Also, since most Email clients restrict downloading images unless the user
    > "ok"s it, is the problem even for those cases really as bad as you describe?


    In your situation, perhaps the cost is worth it. I do not criticise you
    for doing what you do. At least I am not one to say never send an HTML
    email. I am just pointing out that it is not ok for everyone to do this
    just because it is ok or not harmful for some to do it.

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Nov 8, 2008
    #17
  18. shapper

    dorayme Guest

    In article <>,
    Guy Macon <http://www.GuyMacon.com/> wrote:

    > shapper wrote:
    >
    > > I am need to send a newsletter to my web site members.
    > > I would like to send it in Html format.


    > I can, however, save you a lot of trouble by giving you
    > a lot of further trouble, to wit, a HUGE reading list to digest:


    [endless URLs follow...]

    <g>

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Nov 8, 2008
    #18
  19. shapper

    Roy A. Guest

    On 7 Nov, 02:43, shapper <> wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am need to send a newsletter to my web site members. I would like to
    > send it in Html format.
    >
    > 1. What Doctype should I use?
    > 2. What else should I consider? Encoding, etc ...
    > 3. I think I should include the CSS in the Html itself right?
    >    Is there any considerations to the CSS I should use? Text format,
    > etc ...
    > 4. The images should be on my web server and all images on the
    > newsletter should have an url as follows:
    >    http://www.mydomain.com/Newsletter/Image1.jpg


    You allready have those tings. Check out your own website:
    http://www.mydomain.com/
    Roy A., Nov 9, 2008
    #19
  20. shapper

    Nik Coughlin Guest

    "Irina Rempt" <> wrote in message
    news:4915654f$0$188$4all.nl...
    > On Saturday 08 November 2008 09:58, rf wrote:
    >
    >> Ya forgot this one:
    >>
    >> "for those who pay through the nose per *kilobyte* to receive emails on
    >> their telephone but need it check emails on the road but will happily
    >> wait until they get home to read a newsletter on a real computer".

    >
    > Also, "for those who get so much spam HTML email that it's easier to
    > filter
    > anything in HTML into the trash immediately because all serious
    > correspondents know to use plain text".


    Which is fine (if somewhat extreme) if it's personal email but *completely*
    retarded if you use it for work
    Nik Coughlin, Nov 9, 2008
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. =?Utf-8?B?YmlkbGxj?=

    problem sending email in html format

    =?Utf-8?B?YmlkbGxj?=, Sep 28, 2004, in forum: ASP .Net
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    531
    Hans Kesting
    Sep 28, 2004
  2. rote
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    744
  3. CB
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    250
    AlanM
    Nov 16, 2005
  4. arun
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    156
Loading...

Share This Page