Java: Books or Online Tutorials?

Discussion in 'Java' started by Brandon, Jun 21, 2004.

  1. Brandon

    Brandon Guest

    I have been programming in C/C++ for about 6 years. I already know
    Java (the language itself) and the basics of AWT (but not very much)
    and I'm interested in learning about Java interfaces. I'm especially
    interested in Swing. So, given what I already know, would it be
    better to buy a Java book or just look for tutorials online? If
    tutorials, which tutorials are generally regarded as the best? If
    books, which book would be best? I've been having a hard time finding
    good books that aren't for either beginners learning about loops and
    exceptions and whatnot, or experts trying to squeeze all they can out
    of Java.

    -Brandon
    Brandon, Jun 21, 2004
    #1
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  2. Brandon

    Roedy Green Guest

    On 21 Jun 2004 13:09:58 -0700, (Brandon) wrote
    or quoted :

    >So, given what I already know, would it be
    >better to buy a Java book or just look for tutorials online?


    There are a few gotchas to Swing, like contentPane, focus traversal
    and use of paintComponent but the rest is just stamp collecting.

    You can get the basics of most Swing components just by looking them
    up in the Java glossary. e.g. http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jbutton.html

    From there it points you to the Sun docs for the less commonly used
    methods.

    See the table at http://mindprod.com/jgloss/awt.html
    for the equivalent Swing methods to your familiar AWT ones.

    Perhaps you might want to read a tutorial or essay or text for JTable
    and JTree. The other components are pretty straightforward. The
    JavaDoc should suffice.

    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
    See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
    Roedy Green, Jun 21, 2004
    #2
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  3. "Roedy Green" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 21 Jun 2004 13:09:58 -0700, (Brandon) wrote
    > or quoted :
    >
    > >So, given what I already know, would it be
    > >better to buy a Java book or just look for tutorials online?

    >
    > There are a few gotchas to Swing, like contentPane, focus traversal
    > and use of paintComponent but the rest is just stamp collecting.
    >
    > You can get the basics of most Swing components just by looking them
    > up in the Java glossary. e.g. http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jbutton.html
    >
    > From there it points you to the Sun docs for the less commonly used
    > methods.
    >
    > See the table at http://mindprod.com/jgloss/awt.html
    > for the equivalent Swing methods to your familiar AWT ones.
    >
    > Perhaps you might want to read a tutorial or essay or text for JTable
    > and JTree. The other components are pretty straightforward. The
    > JavaDoc should suffice.


    I second that. For the most part you can puzzle out how things work using
    Java Docs. However, if you have been programming for a while and want some
    direct help with how things work, I find Core Java (Horstmann and Cornell, I
    think) to be a good point for reference.
    --
    Gary
    Gary Labowitz, Jun 22, 2004
    #3
  4. Brandon wrote:
    > I have been programming in C/C++ for about 6 years. I already know
    > Java (the language itself) and the basics of AWT (but not very much)
    > and I'm interested in learning about Java interfaces. I'm especially
    > interested in Swing.


    http://java.sun.com/docs/books/tutorial/uiswing/index.html

    More resources are listed in the comp.lang.java.gui FAQ

    /Thomas
    Thomas Weidenfeller, Jun 22, 2004
    #4
  5. Brandon

    David Segall Guest

    (Brandon) wrote:

    >I have been programming in C/C++ for about 6 years. I already know
    >Java (the language itself) and the basics of AWT (but not very much)
    >and I'm interested in learning about Java interfaces. I'm especially
    >interested in Swing. So, given what I already know, would it be
    >better to buy a Java book or just look for tutorials online? If
    >tutorials, which tutorials are generally regarded as the best? If
    >books, which book would be best? I've been having a hard time finding
    >good books that aren't for either beginners learning about loops and
    >exceptions and whatnot, or experts trying to squeeze all they can out
    >of Java.
    >
    >-Brandon

    You choose. Swing Second Edition
    (http://www.manning.com/catalog/view.php?book=robinson2) is widely
    regarded as a definitive reference and tutorial on Swing and is
    available in hard copy or an EBook. I prefer having the hard copy but
    the first edition was released as a free download and is still
    available from several sites including
    http://www.newsoftland.co.nz/newsoftland/free_downloads/javaswingdevelopment.html.
    David Segall, Jun 22, 2004
    #5
  6. Brandon

    Brandon Guest

    Thanks for the advice everyone
    Brandon, Jun 22, 2004
    #6
  7. > You choose. Swing Second Edition
    > (http://www.manning.com/catalog/view.php?book=robinson2) is widely
    > regarded as a definitive reference and tutorial on Swing and is
    > available in hard copy or an EBook. I prefer having the hard copy but
    > the first edition was released as a free download and is still available
    > from several sites including
    > http://www.newsoftland.co.nz/newsoftland/free_downloads/
    > javaswingdevelopment.html.


    Unfortunately, the last address doesn't contain any files (try to download
    any).

    Anyway, the book is great and it's better to have hardcopy.

    Petr
    Petr Aubrecht, Jun 23, 2004
    #7
  8. Brandon

    David Segall Guest

    Petr Aubrecht <> wrote:

    >> You choose. Swing Second Edition
    >> (http://www.manning.com/catalog/view.php?book=robinson2) is widely
    >> regarded as a definitive reference and tutorial on Swing and is
    >> available in hard copy or an EBook. I prefer having the hard copy but
    >> the first edition was released as a free download and is still available
    >> from several sites including
    >> http://www.newsoftland.co.nz/newsoftland/free_downloads/
    >> javaswingdevelopment.html.

    >
    >Unfortunately, the last address doesn't contain any files (try to download
    >any).

    I'm sorry, I didn't test the link. It does seem to be here
    http://javafaq.nu/java/free-swing-book/index.shtml but I should have
    given the file name which is swingdoc.zip. I'm sure it will be
    available via FTP long after these modern crazes like HTTP and Google
    have disappeared. :)
    >
    >Anyway, the book is great and it's better to have hardcopy.
    >
    >Petr
    David Segall, Jun 23, 2004
    #8
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