My first compiler .

Discussion in 'Java' started by Ken Kafieh, May 9, 2004.

  1. Ken Kafieh

    Ken Kafieh Guest

    I am not new to programming. But I am new to Java. I am not anticipating a
    lot of trouble learning it.

    I want to start off by using a good compiler that is in fairly common use.
    I dont want to end up having learned a finge, experimental, rarely used, or
    beta compiler!
    It would be nice if I could just find something that could be considered a
    good reliable, "industry standard" compiler.
    It doesn't need to be state of the art, but I dont exactly want to be
    working with stone knives and tools either.

    A few of the programs I will be writing are going to be very CPU intensive,
    so I prefer a native compiler (for windows) rather than a byte code
    compiler. I figure that a native EXE would run faster than a byte code
    running on a VM. But I am willing to settle for a byte code compiler if
    there is no consensus on a native compiler.

    A free compiler is obviously my first choice. But if I absolutely must
    purchase the compiler then I would definately want to get one with a Free 30
    day trial first, before I purchase it. And naturally, if there are
    compilers that anyone would recommend that have no free trial, but for which
    there is a crack, or serial number, then that's just as good as a free trial
    in my view.

    Thanks a lot for your help in advance!

    -Ken
    Ken Kafieh, May 9, 2004
    #1
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  2. Ken Kafieh

    Matt Parker Guest

    Ken Kafieh wrote:

    > I am not new to programming. But I am new to Java. I am not anticipating
    > a lot of trouble learning it.
    >
    > I want to start off by using a good compiler that is in fairly common use.
    > I dont want to end up having learned a finge, experimental, rarely used,
    > or beta compiler!
    > It would be nice if I could just find something that could be considered a
    > good reliable, "industry standard" compiler.
    > It doesn't need to be state of the art, but I dont exactly want to be
    > working with stone knives and tools either.
    >
    > A few of the programs I will be writing are going to be very CPU
    > intensive, so I prefer a native compiler (for windows) rather than a byte
    > code
    > compiler. I figure that a native EXE would run faster than a byte code
    > running on a VM. But I am willing to settle for a byte code compiler if
    > there is no consensus on a native compiler.
    >


    This is not true. With the latest JIT optimisation techniques, Java is as
    fast as native C in benchmarks, provided you discount the start-up time.
    All the native compilers can also be classed as "experimental" and "fringe"
    so you may as well go with the latest Sun or IBM compiler (personally I
    prefer the Sun one).

    Matt

    --
    Not so interesting...
    http://www.mpcontracting.co.uk
    Matt Parker, May 9, 2004
    #2
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  3. Ken Kafieh

    Murray Guest

    "Ken Kafieh" <kkafieh-StopSp@> wrote in message
    news:h0snc.7689$...
    > I am not new to programming. But I am new to Java. I am not anticipating

    a
    > lot of trouble learning it.
    >
    > I want to start off by using a good compiler that is in fairly common use.
    > I dont want to end up having learned a finge, experimental, rarely used,

    or
    > beta compiler!
    > It would be nice if I could just find something that could be considered a
    > good reliable, "industry standard" compiler.
    > It doesn't need to be state of the art, but I dont exactly want to be
    > working with stone knives and tools either.
    >
    > A few of the programs I will be writing are going to be very CPU

    intensive,
    > so I prefer a native compiler (for windows) rather than a byte code
    > compiler. I figure that a native EXE would run faster than a byte code
    > running on a VM. But I am willing to settle for a byte code compiler if
    > there is no consensus on a native compiler.
    >
    > A free compiler is obviously my first choice. But if I absolutely must
    > purchase the compiler then I would definately want to get one with a Free

    30
    > day trial first, before I purchase it. And naturally, if there are
    > compilers that anyone would recommend that have no free trial, but for

    which
    > there is a crack, or serial number, then that's just as good as a free

    trial
    > in my view.
    >
    > Thanks a lot for your help in advance!
    >
    > -Ken


    Have you installed the Java SDK?
    http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/download.html

    /bin/javac is the standard bytecode compiler. You may also want to try Jikes
    http://www-124.ibm.com/developerworks/oss/jikes/

    As for native compilers, this concept tends to go against the grain of what
    Java is all about, i.e. platform independence. But if you really want to go
    that way, there are native compilers available but some are costly and
    others don't support the full API. While it is true that these can provide
    faster-running code, this is not always the case, and improvements are often
    minimal (depending on the code obviously). JIT compilers can make
    CPU-specific optimisations at run-time which could theoretically allow
    faster execution than natively compiled code. Unless you REALLY need a
    supercharged high performance program, you'd be better off staying away from
    native compilers, especially when you're learning. Actually you'd probably
    be better off sticking with C :)

    http://gcc.gnu.org/java
    http://www.kaffe.org/
    http://www.geocities.com/marcoschmidt.geo/java-native-compilers.html
    Murray, May 9, 2004
    #3
  4. Ken Kafieh

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Sun, 09 May 2004 15:21:49 GMT, "Ken Kafieh"
    <kkafieh-StopSp@> wrote or quoted :

    >I am not new to programming. But I am new to Java. I am not anticipating a
    >lot of trouble learning it.


    see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/gettingstarted.html

    Learning Java can be easy if you take advantage of the wealth of
    online material.

    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
    See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
    Roedy Green, May 9, 2004
    #4
  5. Ken Kafieh

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Sun, 09 May 2004 15:21:49 GMT, "Ken Kafieh"
    <kkafieh-StopSp@> wrote or quoted :

    >It would be nice if I could just find something that could be considered a
    >good reliable, "industry standard" compiler.
    >It doesn't need to be state of the art, but I dont exactly want to be
    >working with stone knives and tools either.


    There are two main choices IBM Jikes and Sun Javac.

    See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jikes.html
    http://mindprod.com/jgloss/javac.html

    for others see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/compiler.html


    Jikes is a bit out of date, but it is faster and gives better error
    messages for newbies.

    You might want an IDE -- a editor-debugger-call the compiler do
    everything but eat. I don't use one. See
    http://mindprod.com/jgloss/ide.html

    For speed you can natively compile apps. Jet is free for personal use.

    See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jet.html
    for other possibilities see
    http://mindprod.com/jgloss/nativecompiler.html


    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
    See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
    Roedy Green, May 9, 2004
    #5
  6. Ken Kafieh

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Sun, 09 May 2004 15:21:49 GMT, "Ken Kafieh"
    <kkafieh-StopSp@> wrote or quoted :

    >A few of the programs I will be writing are going to be very CPU intensive,
    >so I prefer a native compiler (for windows) rather than a byte code
    >compiler. I figure that a native EXE would run faster than a byte code
    >running on a VM. But I am willing to settle for a byte code compiler if
    >there is no consensus on a native compiler.


    hotspot dynamically compiles to native code, and optimises on the fly
    depending on what it notices you are doing. This gives it some
    advantages over static compilation. Try that first.

    For debugging, it is much faster than native compilation. And native
    compilers use Javac class file output as their input.

    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
    See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
    Roedy Green, May 9, 2004
    #6
  7. Roedy Green wrote:
    > On Sun, 09 May 2004 15:21:49 GMT, "Ken Kafieh"
    > <kkafieh-StopSp@> wrote or quoted :
    >
    >
    >>It would be nice if I could just find something that could be considered a
    >>good reliable, "industry standard" compiler.
    >>It doesn't need to be state of the art, but I dont exactly want to be
    >>working with stone knives and tools either.

    >
    >
    > There are two main choices IBM Jikes and Sun Javac.
    >
    > See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jikes.html
    > http://mindprod.com/jgloss/javac.html
    >
    > for others see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/compiler.html
    >
    >
    > Jikes is a bit out of date, but it is faster and gives better error
    > messages for newbies.


    I'd also like to add the Eclipse compiler to that list. I don't think
    you can get it separately from the IDE, but it is one of the nicest java
    bytecode compilers, with a host of lint like features.
    --
    Daniel Sjöblom
    Remove _NOSPAM to reply by mail
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Daniel_Sj=F6blom?=, May 10, 2004
    #7
  8. Ken Kafieh

    Steve Burrus Guest

    Daniel Sjöblom wrote:
    > Roedy Green wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 09 May 2004 15:21:49 GMT, "Ken Kafieh"
    >> <kkafieh-StopSp@> wrote or quoted :
    >>
    >>
    >>> It would be nice if I could just find something that could be
    >>> considered a
    >>> good reliable, "industry standard" compiler.
    >>> It doesn't need to be state of the art, but I dont exactly want to be
    >>> working with stone knives and tools either.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> There are two main choices IBM Jikes and Sun Javac.
    >>
    >> See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jikes.html
    >> http://mindprod.com/jgloss/javac.html
    >>
    >> for others see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/compiler.html
    >>
    >>
    >> Jikes is a bit out of date, but it is faster and gives better error
    >> messages for newbies.

    >
    >
    > I'd also like to add the Eclipse compiler to that list. I don't think
    > you can get it separately from the IDE, but it is one of the nicest java
    > bytecode compilers, with a host of lint like features.


    Roedy, you mentioned the "Jikes" compiler from IBM. Can you please tell
    me how to properly configure it so I can then get it going with some
    compilation of some source code??
    Steve Burrus, May 10, 2004
    #8
  9. Ken Kafieh

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Mon, 10 May 2004 02:18:02 +0300, Daniel Sjöblom
    <_NOSPAM> wrote or quoted :

    >
    >I'd also like to add the Eclipse compiler to that list


    Now I have a faster machine and some more RAM, I should give it a
    second try.

    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
    See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
    Roedy Green, May 10, 2004
    #9
  10. Ken Kafieh

    Roedy Green Guest

    On Mon, 10 May 2004 20:16:38 GMT, Steve Burrus <>
    wrote or quoted :

    >Roedy, you mentioned the "Jikes" compiler from IBM. Can you please tell
    >me how to properly configure it so I can then get it going with some
    >compilation of some source code??


    Nothing to it. Just put it on the path somewhere and set up a
    JIKESPATH like classpath but that includes rt.jar from the JDK you
    want to use.

    for details see http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jikes.html

    --
    Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
    Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
    See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
    Roedy Green, May 10, 2004
    #10
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