OT & FYI: Accelerated C++ Missing Pages. Check yours!

Discussion in 'C++' started by Steven T. Hatton, Aug 26, 2004.

  1. If you happen to have Accelerated C++ by Koenig and Moo, and haven't gotten
    around to reading it, I suggest you count the pages between page 18 and
    page 51. I came up with zero. This is very disappointing since I have
    been intending to read the book for some time now. I finally picked it up
    with the expectation that I would breeze through it as a review and an
    alternative expert perspective on C++. Now it looks as though I will have
    to wait until I am able to get the book replaced.
    --
    "[M]y dislike for the preprocessor is well known. Cpp is essential in C
    programming, and still important in conventional C++ implementations, but
    it is a hack, and so are most of the techniques that rely on it. ...I think
    the time has come to be serious about macro-free C++ programming." - B. S.
     
    Steven T. Hatton, Aug 26, 2004
    #1
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  2. "Steven T. Hatton" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > If you happen to have Accelerated C++ by Koenig and Moo, and haven't

    gotten
    > around to reading it, I suggest you count the pages between page 18 and
    > page 51. I came up with zero. This is very disappointing since I have
    > been intending to read the book for some time now. I finally picked it up
    > with the expectation that I would breeze through it as a review and an
    > alternative expert perspective on C++. Now it looks as though I will have
    > to wait until I am able to get the book replaced.


    I just looked through copies of several different printings, and the pages
    are all fine in those copies. That's a relief, because it suggests that
    your problem is not systematic, but is probably a relatively rare
    phenomenon.

    The copies I checked include ones from the two latest printings. Can you
    tell me which printing you have?
     
    Andrew Koenig, Aug 26, 2004
    #2
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  3. Steven T. Hatton

    Mike Wahler Guest

    "Steven T. Hatton" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > If you happen to have Accelerated C++ by Koenig and Moo, and haven't

    gotten
    > around to reading it, I suggest you count the pages between page 18 and
    > page 51. I came up with zero.


    They're OK in my copy (First Printing, Aug 2000). The book
    does have some typos and errors, yes (mostly rectified by
    web errata pages), but all the book's pages are there.

    > This is very disappointing


    I can imagine.

    > since I have
    > been intending to read the book for some time now. I finally picked it up
    > with the expectation that I would breeze through it as a review and an
    > alternative expert perspective on C++. Now it looks as though I will have
    > to wait until I am able to get the book replaced.


    Yes, definitely go back to where you got it and request a refund
    or replacement.

    If you got your book in a book store, perhaps some other patron
    ripped out those two chapters and took them. Or perhaps it was
    a simple mechanical malfunction that went unnoticed during printing.

    -Mike
     
    Mike Wahler, Aug 26, 2004
    #3
  4. Andrew Koenig wrote:

    > I just looked through copies of several different printings, and the pages
    > are all fine in those copies. That's a relief, because it suggests that
    > your problem is not systematic, but is probably a relatively rare
    > phenomenon.


    That's been said of me more than once. :-D

    > The copies I checked include ones from the two latest printings. Can you
    > tell me which printing you have?


    December 2003, 7th printing. There is absolutely no evidence of any kind of
    physical mechanical malfunction in the fabrication stage of printing.
    There are no pages missaligned, bent, loose, excessively or insufficiently
    glued, etc. I'm not an expert in bookbinding, but this defect appears to
    have been generated at a level above the physical process of binding.
    That's what makes me suspect I'm not the only one to find these pages
    missing. If I am. That's all for the better. If not, I hope my calling
    attention to the situation will help all parties involved identify and
    correct the problem.
    --
    "[M]y dislike for the preprocessor is well known. Cpp is essential in C
    programming, and still important in conventional C++ implementations, but
    it is a hack, and so are most of the techniques that rely on it. ...I think
    the time has come to be serious about macro-free C++ programming." - B. S.
     
    Steven T. Hatton, Aug 27, 2004
    #4
  5. "Steven T. Hatton" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    > > The copies I checked include ones from the two latest printings. Can

    you
    > > tell me which printing you have?


    > December 2003, 7th printing. There is absolutely no evidence of any kind

    of
    > physical mechanical malfunction in the fabrication stage of printing.
    > There are no pages missaligned, bent, loose, excessively or insufficiently
    > glued, etc. I'm not an expert in bookbinding, but this defect appears to
    > have been generated at a level above the physical process of binding.
    > That's what makes me suspect I'm not the only one to find these pages
    > missing. If I am. That's all for the better. If not, I hope my calling
    > attention to the situation will help all parties involved identify and
    > correct the problem.


    I just looked at my copy of the 7th printing, and it looks fine.

    Incidentally, you said originally that the missing pages were 18-51. That
    can't be right, because page 18, being an even-numbered page, would share a
    physical piece of paper with page 17. Similarly, if page 51 is missing,
    page 52 must also be missing because they share a physical piece of paper.
    So what are the exact numbers?

    The book has 14 pages with roman numerals before page 1, so the page with
    number 1 is actually the 15th page in the book. Books are usually bound in
    "signatures" of 16 pages, which means that page 3 is the first page of a
    signature, as is page 19. I am therefore going to guess that page 18 is
    actually present, and page 19 is the first missing page. If two signatures
    were missing, then the first non-missing page after page 19 would be page
    19+32, or page 51. So if pages 19-50 were missing, that would be exactly
    two signatures, just the kind of problem that one might expect to find if
    there were a mechanical error in the printing process.

    Anyway, that's my guess. I would appreciate confirmation of the exact
    numbers of the missing pages, either publicly or by private email.
     
    Andrew Koenig, Aug 27, 2004
    #5
  6. Andrew Koenig wrote:

    > So if pages 19-50 were missing, that would be exactly
    > two signatures, just the kind of problem that one might expect to find if
    > there were a mechanical error in the printing process.
    >
    > Anyway, that's my guess. I would appreciate confirmation of the exact
    > numbers of the missing pages, either publicly or by private email.


    Ok, I'm gonna be a pedant here. What I originally wrote was "I suggest you
    count the pages _between_ page 18 and page 51." The pages missing are those
    which should lie between 18 and 51, i.e., 19 through 50, inclusive. Yes,
    that does seem to constitute a reasonable count and numbering for a couple
    of signatures. Typically when a signature is omitted in my printing
    operation it is due to operator error:

    hattons@ljosalfr:/download/org/gnu/gcc-3.4.0/gcc/
    Fri Aug 27 15:24:37:> cat $(which make-book.sh)
    #!/bin/bash
    SIGNATURE=20
    usage="make-book.sh [-s signature] filename"
    while getopts ":s:w:c:" opt; do
    case $opt in
    s ) SIGNATURE=$OPTARG ;;
    \? ) echo $usage
    exit 1 ;;
    esac
    done

    shift $(($OPTIND - 1))
    FILE_NAME=$1
    psbook -s$SIGNATURE $FILE_NAME | psnup -pletter -2 >
    ${FILE_NAME%.ps}-book.ps;
    hattons@ljosalfr:/download/org/gnu/gcc-3.4.0/gcc/
    Fri Aug 27 15:25:12:>

    But the lack of confirmation from others suggests to me it was an isolated
    mechanical anomaly which produced the defect. I really have little concept
    of the machinery used to mass produce books. At this point it's just idle
    curiosity, but I would really like to understand /how/ this happened. I
    would expect such an incongruence to be fairly noticeable to the machine
    operator. Perhaps they simply let it pass on the assumption that 'it'll
    show up eventually'.
    --
    "[M]y dislike for the preprocessor is well known. Cpp is essential in C
    programming, and still important in conventional C++ implementations, but
    it is a hack, and so are most of the techniques that rely on it. ...I think
    the time has come to be serious about macro-free C++ programming." - B. S.
     
    Steven T. Hatton, Aug 27, 2004
    #6
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