Python doc problems example: gzip module

Discussion in 'Python' started by Xah Lee, Aug 31, 2005.

  1. Xah Lee

    Xah Lee Guest

    today i need to use Python to decompress gzip files.

    since i'm familiar with Python doc and have 10 years of computing
    experience with 4 years in unix admin and perl, i have quickly located
    the official doc:

    http://python.org/doc/2.4.1/lib/module-gzip.html

    but after a minute of scanning, please someone tell me what the **** is
    it talking about?

    **** the Python programing morons.

    Thanks.

    I just need to decompress files. Is it:

    import gzip;
    gzip.GzipFile("/Users/xah/access_log.1.gz");

    can someone put a example into that fucking doc so that people don't
    have to wade thru whatever **** it is trying to sound big?

    For more about Python doc, please see:
    http://xahlee.org/perl-python/re-write_notes.html

    Xah

    ∑ http://xahlee.org/
    Xah Lee, Aug 31, 2005
    #1
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  2. Xah Lee

    Xah Lee Guest

    Today i need to use Python to compress/decompress gzip files.

    I quickly found the official doc:
    http://python.org/doc/2.4.1/lib/module-gzip.html

    I'd imagine it being a function something like
    GzipFile(filePath, comprress/decompress, outputPath)

    however, scanning the doc after 20 seconds there's no single example
    showing how it is used.

    Instead, the doc starts with some arcane info about compatibility with
    some zlib module and other software.

    Then it talks in a very big computer sciency way with bad writing about
    the main function GzipFile. No perspectives whatsoever about using it
    to solve a problem nor a concrete description of how it functions.
    Instead, jargons of Class, Constructor, Object etc are thrown together
    with presumption of reader's expertise of Python's file objects and
    gzip technical details.

    after no understanding, and being not a Python expert, i wanted to read
    about file objects but there's no link.

    after locating the file object doc page
    http://python.org/doc/2.4.1/lib/bltin-file-objects.html
    itself talks in some obfuscated incomprehensible way.

    ---------------
    Here's the detail of the GzipFile description:

    class GzipFile( [filename[, mode[, compresslevel[, fileobj]]]])
    Constructor for the GzipFile class, which simulates most of the methods
    of a file object, with the exception of the readinto() and truncate()
    methods. At least one of fileobj and filename must be given a
    non-trivial value.
    The new class instance is based on fileobj, which can be a regular
    file, a StringIO object, or any other object which simulates a file. It
    defaults to None, in which case filename is opened to provide a file
    object.

    yeah, blab blab blab. what the **** are you talking about? So, how to
    use it?

    When fileobj is not None, the filename argument is only used to be
    included in the gzip file header, which may includes the original
    filename of the uncompressed file. It defaults to the filename of
    fileobj, if discernible; otherwise, it defaults to the empty string,
    and in this case the original filename is not included in the header.

    what the ****??

    The mode argument can be any of 'r', 'rb', 'a', 'ab', 'w', or 'wb',
    depending on whether the file will be read or written. The default is
    the mode of fileobj if discernible; otherwise, the default is 'rb'. If
    not given, the 'b' flag will be added to the mode to ensure the file is
    opened in binary mode for cross-platform portability.

    discernible? so, what the **** are exactly these modes? can't you
    describe them concretely?

    The compresslevel argument is an integer from 1 to 9 controlling the
    level of compression; 1 is fastest and produces the least compression,
    and 9 is slowest and produces the most compression. The default is 9.

    Calling a GzipFile object's close() method does not close fileobj,
    since you might wish to append more material after the compressed data.
    This also allows you to pass a StringIO object opened for writing as
    fileobj, and retrieve the resulting memory buffer using the StringIO
    object's getvalue() method.

    huh? append more material? pass a StringIO? and memory buffer?

    --------------------
    Motherfucking 90% of programers using this module really just want to
    compress or decompress a file.

    **** unix advocates and **** Perlers and **** Python morons.

    PS For more about Python doc, please see:
    http://xahlee.org/perl-python/re-write_notes.html

    Xah

    ∑ http://xahlee.org/
    Xah Lee, Aug 31, 2005
    #2
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  3. Xah Lee

    Peter Maas Guest

    Xah Lee schrieb:
    > today i need to use Python to decompress gzip files.
    >
    > since i'm familiar with Python doc and have 10 years of computing
    > experience with 4 years in unix admin and perl, i have quickly located
    > the official doc:
    >
    > http://python.org/doc/2.4.1/lib/module-gzip.html
    >
    > but after a minute of scanning, please someone tell me what the **** is
    > it talking about?
    >
    > **** the Python programing morons.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > I just need to decompress files. Is it:
    >
    > import gzip;
    > gzip.GzipFile("/Users/xah/access_log.1.gz");
    >
    > can someone put a example into that fucking doc so that people don't
    > have to wade thru whatever **** it is trying to sound big?


    Here's the example:
    import gzip

    # read fucked
    fuckedfile = gzip.GzipFile('somefile.gz')
    content = fuckedfile.read()
    fuckedfile.close()

    # write unfucked
    unfuckedfile = file('somefile','w')
    unfuckedfile.write(content)
    unfuckedfile.close()

    Please feel free to insert this fucking example into the fucking docs.

    Have a nice ... eh fucking day :)

    --
    -------------------------------------------------------------------
    Peter Maas, M+R Infosysteme, D-52070 Aachen, Tel +49-241-93878-0
    E-mail 'cGV0ZXIubWFhc0BtcGx1c3IuZGU=\n'.decode('base64')
    -------------------------------------------------------------------
    Peter Maas, Aug 31, 2005
    #3
  4. Peter Maas wrote:

    > Please feel free to insert this fucking example into the fucking docs.


    or use the fucking search engine. searching for "python <module> example"
    and clicking the "I feel lucky" button tends to work quite well. e.g.

    http://www.google.com/search?q=python gzip example&btnI=

    </F>
    Fredrik Lundh, Aug 31, 2005
    #4
  5. Xah Lee enlightened us with:
    > but after a minute of scanning, please someone tell me what the ****
    > is it talking about?


    How difficult is it? The first line of the Gzip class explains it all
    to me: "Constructor for the GzipFile class, which simulates most of
    the methods of a file object"

    Sybren
    --
    The problem with the world is stupidity. Not saying there should be a
    capital punishment for stupidity, but why don't we just take the
    safety labels off of everything and let the problem solve itself?
    Frank Zappa
    Sybren Stuvel, Aug 31, 2005
    #5
  6. Xah Lee

    Xah Lee Guest

    nothing personal my friend. But just in case you are interested about
    getting it:

    the question here is about quality of documentation, not about whether
    you got it.
    http://xahlee.org/UnixResource_dir/writ/python_doc.html

    Xah

    ∑ http://xahlee.org/


    Sybren Stuvel wrote:
    > Xah Lee enlightened us with:
    > > but after a minute of scanning, please someone tell me what the ****
    > > is it talking about?

    >
    > How difficult is it? The first line of the Gzip class explains it all
    > to me: "Constructor for the GzipFile class, which simulates most of
    > the methods of a file object"
    Xah Lee, Sep 1, 2005
    #6
  7. Xah Lee

    Peter Wang Guest

    >> Constructor for the GzipFile class, which simulates most of the methods
    >> of a file object, with the exception of the readinto() and truncate()

    >
    > yeah, blab blab blab. what the **** are you talking about? So, how to
    > use it?


    um... presumably you type "zippedfile = GzipFile(...)" and depending on
    whether you are creating a new file, or extracting an existing
    GzipFile. the documentation says:

    > The new class instance is based on fileobj, which can be a regular file, a
    > StringIO object, or any other object which simulates a file. It defaults to
    > None, in which case filename is opened to provide a file object."


    so i guess in your case you would want to do "zippedfile =
    GzipFile("myfile.gz")".

    >> When fileobj is not None, the filename argument is only used to be
    >> included in the gzip file header, which may includes the original
    >> filename of the uncompressed file. It defaults to the filename of
    >> fileobj, if discernible; otherwise, it defaults to the empty string,
    >> and in this case the original filename is not included in the header.

    >
    > what the ****??


    when you "gzip -d myfile.gz", the resultant output name might not be
    "myfile". The uncompressed name can be stored in the gzip header, and
    so if you provide both a fileobj argument and a filename argument to
    the GzipFile constructor, it will use fileobj for the data stream and
    just place filename into the header (as opposed to opening the file
    "filename").

    >> The mode argument can be any of 'r', 'rb', 'a', 'ab', 'w', or 'wb',
    >> depending on whether the file will be read or written. The default is
    >> the mode of fileobj if discernible; otherwise, the default is 'rb'. If
    >> not given, the 'b' flag will be added to the mode to ensure the file is
    >> opened in binary mode for cross-platform portability.

    >
    > discernible? so, what the **** are exactly these modes? can't you
    > describe them concretely?


    these are the same modes that are used in just about every single
    programming language when it comes to opening files. these modes are
    described in the Python tutorial and in the core Python documentation
    about files and file I/O. It should not be surprising, therefore, that
    GzipFile, which "simulates most of the methods of a file object",
    should have the same semantics when it comes to file modes.

    it is actually quite shocking to me that someone with 10 years of
    computing experience would not know what "rb" and "rb" mean in the
    context of opening files in a programming language.

    >> Calling a GzipFile object's close() method does not close fileobj,
    >> since you might wish to append more material after the compressed data.
    >> This also allows you to pass a StringIO object opened for writing as
    >> fileobj, and retrieve the resulting memory buffer using the StringIO
    >> object's getvalue() method.

    >
    > huh? append more material? pass a StringIO? and memory buffer?


    you see, not everyone who uses GzipFile will be decompressing files.
    sometimes they will be *compressing* file data. in this case, it's
    very possible that they want to compress data going over a network
    stream, or embed some gzipped into the middle of their own file format.
    GzipFile doesn't make any assumptions about what the user is going to
    do with the gzipped data or the file object that the Gzip module is
    writing into/reading from.

    > Motherfucking 90% of programers using this module really just want to
    > compress or decompress a file.


    I disagree. I think a whopping (non-motherfucking) 100% of programmers
    using this module want to compress or decompress file data. If someone
    just wants to decompress a file, wouldn't they just do:

    import os
    os.system("gzip -d filename.gz")

    The GzipFile module is meant to be used by folks who want to gzip or
    gunzip file data in a programmatic function. It's not meant to be a
    drop-in, shell-scripting replacement for the gzip command.

    -peter
    Peter Wang, Sep 1, 2005
    #7
  8. Xah Lee

    Guest Guest

    On 1 Sep 2005 07:24:26 -0700
    Peter Wang wrote:

    > >> Constructor for the GzipFile class, which simulates most of the methods
    > >> of a file object, with the exception of the readinto() and truncate()

    > >
    > > yeah, blab blab blab. what the **** are you talking about? So, how to
    > > use it?


    > >> and in this case the original filename is not included in the header.

    > >
    > > what the ****??

    >
    > >> since you might wish to append more material after the compressed data.
    > >> This also allows you to pass a StringIO object opened for writing as
    > >> fileobj, and retrieve the resulting memory buffer using the StringIO
    > >> object's getvalue() method.

    > >
    > > huh? append more material? pass a StringIO? and memory buffer?

    >
    > you see, not everyone who uses GzipFile will be decompressing files.


    Am I the only one who thinks you are talking with some perverted kind of
    emacs-doctor-like or elise-like computer program?

    --
    jk
    Guest, Sep 1, 2005
    #8
  9. Xah Lee

    plainsane Guest

    Peter Maas wrote:

    > Xah Lee schrieb:
    > > today i need to use Python to decompress gzip files.
    > >
    > > since i'm familiar with Python doc and have 10 years of computing
    > > experience with 4 years in unix admin and perl, i have quickly located
    > > the official doc:
    > >
    > > http://python.org/doc/2.4.1/lib/module-gzip.html
    > >
    > > but after a minute of scanning, please someone tell me what the **** is
    > > it talking about?
    > >
    > > **** the Python programing morons.
    > >
    > > Thanks.
    > >
    > > I just need to decompress files. Is it:
    > >
    > > import gzip;
    > > gzip.GzipFile("/Users/xah/access_log.1.gz");
    > >
    > > can someone put a example into that fucking doc so that people don't
    > > have to wade thru whatever **** it is trying to sound big?

    >
    > Here's the example:
    > import gzip
    >
    > # read fucked
    > fuckedfile = gzip.GzipFile('somefile.gz')
    > content = fuckedfile.read()
    > fuckedfile.close()
    >
    > # write unfucked
    > unfuckedfile = file('somefile','w')
    > unfuckedfile.write(content)
    > unfuckedfile.close()
    >
    > Please feel free to insert this fucking example into the fucking docs.
    >
    > Have a nice ... eh fucking day :)
    >
    > --
    > -------------------------------------------------------------------
    > Peter Maas, M+R Infosysteme, D-52070 Aachen, Tel +49-241-93878-0
    > E-mail 'cGV0ZXIubWFhc0BtcGx1c3IuZGU=\n'.decode('base64')
    > -------------------------------------------------------------------


    yes yes yes, i love this "fucking" post...nice "fucking" response
    man!!!!
    plainsane, Sep 1, 2005
    #9
  10. Xah Lee

    Guest

    Peter Maas wrote:

    > Xah Lee schrieb:
    > > today i need to use Python to decompress gzip files.
    > >
    > > since i'm familiar with Python doc and have 10 years of computing
    > > experience with 4 years in unix admin and perl, i have quickly located
    > > the official doc:
    > >
    > > http://python.org/doc/2.4.1/lib/module-gzip.html
    > >
    > > but after a minute of scanning, please someone tell me what the **** is
    > > it talking about?
    > >
    > > **** the Python programing morons.
    > >
    > > Thanks.
    > >
    > > I just need to decompress files. Is it:
    > >
    > > import gzip;
    > > gzip.GzipFile("/Users/xah/access_log.1.gz");
    > >
    > > can someone put a example into that fucking doc so that people don't
    > > have to wade thru whatever **** it is trying to sound big?

    >
    > Here's the example:
    > import gzip
    >
    > # read fucked
    > fuckedfile = gzip.GzipFile('somefile.gz')
    > content = fuckedfile.read()
    > fuckedfile.close()
    >
    > # write unfucked
    > unfuckedfile = file('somefile','w')
    > unfuckedfile.write(content)
    > unfuckedfile.close()
    >
    > Please feel free to insert this fucking example into the fucking docs.
    >
    > Have a nice ... eh fucking day :)
    >
    > --
    > -------------------------------------------------------------------
    > Peter Maas, M+R Infosysteme, D-52070 Aachen, Tel +49-241-93878-0
    > E-mail 'cGV0ZXIubWFhc0BtcGx1c3IuZGU=\n'.decode('base64')
    > -------------------------------------------------------------------


    The word has now completely lost any meaning for me.
    , Sep 2, 2005
    #10
  11. Xah Lee

    EP Guest

    "Xah Lee" <> wrote:

    > today i need to <snip> decompress


    > since i'm familiar with <snip>


    <snip> what the ****
    <snip>

    > **** the <snip>


    > I just need to decompress <snip>


    <snip> that fucking doc
    <snip> whatever ****



    Is it just me or, do you suppose, with so much unnecessary "f" word, this is not a post at all, but a cleverly encoded message to fellow unsavory characters. The "f"'s are just enough to thwart (ahem,lesser!) intellects from critically analyzing the text. And as far as I can tell, there was no real content in the post.

    Could the position of the f words be the key to the encrypted message?

    I need to enlist the help of smarter minds to decode the message - I have zero experience in this, but I am sure there are minds bright enough on this list to crack the XL posts.


    Here's all I could get going, trying to see if there was something in the name itself (but clearly the below is kindergarten level, at best)


    >>> eName="xahlee"
    >>> def fName(name="", offset=0, p=1):

    newName="".join([chr(ord(c)+ offset -(26*((ord(c)+offset)>122))) for c in name])
    if p==1:
    print newName
    return newName

    >>> for i in range(0,26):

    nn=fName(name,i)


    xahlee
    ybimff
    zcjngg
    adkohh
    belpii
    cfmqjj
    dgnrkk
    ehosll
    fiptmm
    gjqunn
    hkrvoo
    ilswpp
    jmtxqq
    knuyrr
    lovzss
    mpwatt
    nqxbuu
    orycvv
    pszdww
    qtaexx
    rubfyy
    svcgzz
    twdhaa
    uxeibb
    vyfjcc
    wzgkdd

    Certainly this one caught my eye ("rubfyy") - Ruby with the f-you acronym inside it!


    Sorry, folks, its been a long week and I need to decompress.



    EP
    EP, Sep 2, 2005
    #11
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