trends

Discussion in 'C++' started by coal@mailvault.com, Oct 24, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Recently a large company made online versions of their word
    processing and related products available. I guess they
    were responding to another large company that already has
    this sort of functionality online. More recently I read that Quicken
    and other money management programs are
    now available online.

    It seems like C++ is falling behind the curve again in
    this area. In 1977 Comeau debuted their "online
    compiler." It was great at the time, but they haven't
    done anything with it since. Surprisingly other compiler
    vendors haven't even bothered to take similar steps. Are
    any vendors planning to take the plunge any time soon?

    They might not attempt to provide object code for
    multiple platforms, but they could provide fully
    instantiated source code that could be used as input
    to a simpler, local compiler. That might require a
    whole program assumption, but that isn't a problem
    in most cases.

    Brian Wood
    Ebenezer Enterprises
    www.webebenezer.net
     
    , Oct 24, 2007
    #1
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  2. Rolf Magnus Guest

    wrote:

    > Recently a large company made online versions of their word
    > processing and related products available. I guess they
    > were responding to another large company that already has
    > this sort of functionality online. More recently I read that Quicken
    > and other money management programs are
    > now available online.
    >
    > It seems like C++ is falling behind the curve again in
    > this area. In 1977 Comeau debuted their "online
    > compiler." It was great at the time, but they haven't
    > done anything with it since.


    Not sure what you mean by "online compiler", but you can try out Comeau
    online AFAIK.

    > Surprisingly other compiler vendors haven't even bothered to take similar
    > steps. Are any vendors planning to take the plunge any time soon?


    A few years ago, SourceForge had a compile farm that you could use to
    compile your opensource software for various platforms. That might still
    exist. I haven't checked for a while.

    > They might not attempt to provide object code for
    > multiple platforms, but they could provide fully
    > instantiated source code that could be used as input
    > to a simpler, local compiler. That might require a
    > whole program assumption, but that isn't a problem
    > in most cases.


    I don't see what that would be good for.
     
    Rolf Magnus, Oct 25, 2007
    #2
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  3. Guest

    On Oct 24, 11:18 pm, Rolf Magnus <> wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > Recently a large company made online versions of their word
    > > processing and related products available. I guess they
    > > were responding to another large company that already has
    > > this sort of functionality online. More recently I read that Quicken
    > > and other money management programs are
    > > now available online.

    >
    > > It seems like C++ is falling behind the curve again in
    > > this area. In 1977 Comeau debuted their "online
    > > compiler." It was great at the time, but they haven't
    > > done anything with it since.

    >
    > Not sure what you mean by "online compiler", but you can try out Comeau
    > online AFAIK.
    >


    I'm talking about a compiler that is designed to not exit after one
    run, is
    available online, and returns more than warnings.

    > > Surprisingly other compiler vendors haven't even bothered to take similar
    > > steps. Are any vendors planning to take the plunge any time soon?

    >
    > A few years ago, SourceForge had a compile farm that you could use to
    > compile your opensource software for various platforms. That might still
    > exist. I haven't checked for a while.
    >
    > > They might not attempt to provide object code for
    > > multiple platforms, but they could provide fully
    > > instantiated source code that could be used as input
    > > to a simpler, local compiler. That might require a
    > > whole program assumption, but that isn't a problem
    > > in most cases.

    >
    > I don't see what that would be good for.


    It would help with portability. Generated code would either
    be correct (on all platforms) or not.

    It would also be easier to get updates to people that want them.

    Brian Wood
    Ebenezer Enterprises
    www.webebenezer.net
     
    , Oct 25, 2007
    #3
  4. wrote:
    > It seems like C++ is falling behind the curve again in
    > this area. In 1977 Comeau debuted their "online
    > compiler."


    Given that C++ was developed in 1979 (and not even named "C++"
    until 1983), I have hard time believing that.
     
    Juha Nieminen, Oct 26, 2007
    #4
  5. Juha Nieminen wrote:
    > wrote:
    >> It seems like C++ is falling behind the curve again in
    >> this area. In 1977 Comeau debuted their "online
    >> compiler."

    >
    > Given that C++ was developed in 1979 (and not even named "C++"
    > until 1983), I have hard time believing that.


    Well, nobody said Comeau debuted a C++ compiler. :)

    V
    --
    Please remove capital 'A's when replying by e-mail
    I do not respond to top-posted replies, please don't ask
     
    Victor Bazarov, Oct 26, 2007
    #5
  6. Guest

    On Oct 26, 5:22 am, Juha Nieminen <> wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > It seems like C++ is falling behind the curve again in
    > > this area. In 1977 Comeau debuted their "online
    > > compiler."

    >
    > Given that C++ was developed in 1979 (and not even named "C++"
    > until 1983), I have hard time believing that.


    I was kidding. I was trying to make the point that it has
    been quite a while and they haven't, as far as I can tell,
    developed the idea. They took the lead and still have it,
    but it wouldn't be very difficult for another company to
    catch up with them. Microsoft, one of the companies I
    referred to in the original post, seems to have only made
    their word processing software available online because of
    competition. They could have done it years ago. It may be
    a similar situation here.

    Brian
     
    , Oct 26, 2007
    #6
  7. James Kanze Guest

    On Oct 26, 5:55 pm, wrote:
    > On Oct 26, 5:22 am, Juha Nieminen <> wrote:


    > > wrote:
    > > > It seems like C++ is falling behind the curve again in
    > > > this area. In 1977 Comeau debuted their "online
    > > > compiler."


    > > Given that C++ was developed in 1979 (and not even named "C++"
    > > until 1983), I have hard time believing that.


    > I was kidding. I was trying to make the point that it has
    > been quite a while and they haven't, as far as I can tell,
    > developed the idea. They took the lead and still have it,
    > but it wouldn't be very difficult for another company to
    > catch up with them. Microsoft, one of the companies I
    > referred to in the original post, seems to have only made
    > their word processing software available online because of
    > competition. They could have done it years ago. It may be
    > a similar situation here.


    I don't know. Comeau offers its online compilation service as
    just that, a service. They sell compilers, and doubtlessly, if
    you want to use their compiler to develop software, they'd
    prefer you pay them for it (and frankly, at the prices they
    charge, I can't understand why they don't have a monopoly---it's
    the best compiler around, and it's also the cheapest).

    More generally, I think there is something in what you say. A
    commercial operation, obviously, wouldn't use an on line
    compiler, but if Google can offer 3 Gig space for email, the
    idea of offering an on line compiler (with projects, etc.,
    stored on the server) for hobby programmers and students isn't
    so outlandish. It would require some thought (you obviously
    can't edit any significant code in a post box of a Web page),
    but IMHO, it should be doable.

    --
    James Kanze (GABI Software) email:
    Conseils en informatique orientée objet/
    Beratung in objektorientierter Datenverarbeitung
    9 place Sémard, 78210 St.-Cyr-l'École, France, +33 (0)1 30 23 00 34
     
    James Kanze, Oct 27, 2007
    #7
  8. cplusplus Guest

    DUFUS MORON GO FRENCH KISS YOUR MOM AND COME BACK
    OH WAIT YOU DON'T KNOW HOW TO FRENCH KISS WELL HERE'S A HINT STICK
    YOUR TOUNGE DOWN HER THROAT
     
    cplusplus, Oct 27, 2007
    #8
  9. Guest

    On Oct 27, 6:26 am, James Kanze <> wrote:
    > On Oct 26, 5:55 pm, wrote:
    >
    > > I was kidding. I was trying to make the point that it has
    > > been quite a while and they haven't, as far as I can tell,
    > > developed the idea. They took the lead and still have it,
    > > but it wouldn't be very difficult for another company to
    > > catch up with them. Microsoft, one of the companies I
    > > referred to in the original post, seems to have only made
    > > their word processing software available online because of
    > > competition. They could have done it years ago. It may be
    > > a similar situation here.

    >
    > I don't know. Comeau offers its online compilation service as
    > just that, a service. They sell compilers, and doubtlessly, if
    > you want to use their compiler to develop software, they'd
    > prefer you pay them for it (and frankly, at the prices they
    > charge, I can't understand why they don't have a monopoly---it's
    > the best compiler around, and it's also the cheapest).
    >


    I'm certainly for them being able to make money and they
    could have a subscription service if they wanted to do it
    that way. My guess is they have a hard time getting the
    word out. They don't have the money to advertise like some
    other companies. It's fairly cheap, but don't forget open
    source compilers.

    > More generally, I think there is something in what you say. A
    > commercial operation, obviously, wouldn't use an on line
    > compiler, but if Google can offer 3 Gig space for email, the
    > idea of offering an on line compiler (with projects, etc.,
    > stored on the server) for hobby programmers and students isn't
    > so outlandish. It would require some thought (you obviously
    > can't edit any significant code in a post box of a Web page),
    > but IMHO, it should be doable.
    >


    That's interesting... students might be a driving force.
    There may be an order --
    individual students
    grad students in organizations
    companies with debt
    .....

    I think on line compilers will eventually be used by commercial
    operations as well. They could be private to a company, but still
    be on line.

    Brian Wood
    Ebenezer Enterprises
     
    , Oct 29, 2007
    #9
  10. Guest

    On Oct 24, 2:46 pm, wrote:
    > Recently a large company made online versions of their word
    > processing and related products available. I guess they
    > were responding to another large company that already has
    > this sort of functionality online. More recently I read that Quicken
    > and other money management programs are
    > now available online.
    >


    To update this a little
    http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/industry_sectors/technology/article2917414.ece


    "We are just a few years away from the end of the shrink-wrapped
    software business. By 2010, people will not be buying software,"

    That's a quote from the article. I think there will still be
    sales of shrink-wrapped software in 2010, but I agree with
    the gist of it.


    Brian Wood
    Ebenezer Enterprises
    www.webebenezer.net
     
    , Nov 24, 2007
    #10
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