Where to find decent free or cheap Java hosting?

Discussion in 'Java' started by Daniel Pitts, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. Daniel Pitts

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    I've been working on my AT-Robots program
    <https://sourceforge.net/projects/at-robots2-j/>, and I'm getting ready
    to create a "Tournament Server" for it. Basically, what that means is a
    webapp where someone can upload their robot definitions to compete
    against the others that have already been uploaded. I think this is a
    necessary next step in order to start building a community around my
    project, but I don't really have excess capital to spend on an otherwise
    free project.

    I do have my own personal "server", but it lives in my house and isn't
    very "stable". I've also looked into nosupportlinuxhosting.com, and
    while I can get Java to start up with a *lot* of finagling, it doesn't
    seem likely to be useful to me as a host for this kind of work.

    Just thinking out loud here, maybe the free (for a year) Micro Instance
    in EC2 is the way to go, but I don't know if that's "big" enough for a
    Java web-app. Anyone have experience with that?

    Any ideas or suggestions are appreciated. I'm looking to spend < $5/mo
    if possible. At this point traffic will be fairly minimal, and free is
    best, but it has to work well enough when it is used. I'm not concerned
    about scalability at first, since when I do need to scale, I'll probably
    be able to monetize at least a little and use that to pay for a real host.

    Thanks everyone,
    Daniel.
     
    Daniel Pitts, Mar 19, 2012
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. On 3/19/2012 9:59 AM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    > I've been working on my AT-Robots program
    > <https://sourceforge.net/projects/at-robots2-j/>, and I'm getting ready
    > to create a "Tournament Server" for it. Basically, what that means is a
    > webapp where someone can upload their robot definitions to compete
    > against the others that have already been uploaded. I think this is a
    > necessary next step in order to start building a community around my
    > project, but I don't really have excess capital to spend on an otherwise
    > free project.
    >
    > I do have my own personal "server", but it lives in my house and isn't
    > very "stable". I've also looked into nosupportlinuxhosting.com, and
    > while I can get Java to start up with a *lot* of finagling, it doesn't
    > seem likely to be useful to me as a host for this kind of work.
    >
    > Just thinking out loud here, maybe the free (for a year) Micro Instance
    > in EC2 is the way to go, but I don't know if that's "big" enough for a
    > Java web-app. Anyone have experience with that?
    >
    > Any ideas or suggestions are appreciated. I'm looking to spend < $5/mo
    > if possible. At this point traffic will be fairly minimal, and free is
    > best, but it has to work well enough when it is used. I'm not concerned
    > about scalability at first, since when I do need to scale, I'll probably
    > be able to monetize at least a little and use that to pay for a real host.
    >
    > Thanks everyone,
    > Daniel.


    What exactly to you mean by Java hosting?

    --

    Knute Johnson
     
    Knute Johnson, Mar 19, 2012
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Daniel Pitts

    Paul Cager Guest

    On Mar 19, 4:59 pm, Daniel Pitts
    <> wrote:
    > I've been working on my AT-Robots program
    > <https://sourceforge.net/projects/at-robots2-j/>, and I'm getting ready
    > to create a "Tournament Server" for it.  Basically, what that means is a
    > webapp where someone can upload their robot definitions to compete
    > against the others that have already been uploaded.  I think this is a
    > necessary next step in order to start building a community around my
    > project, but I don't really have excess capital to spend on an otherwise
    > free project.
    >
    > I do have my own personal "server", but it lives in my house and isn't
    > very "stable".  I've also looked into nosupportlinuxhosting.com, and
    > while I can get Java to start up with a *lot* of finagling, it doesn't
    > seem likely to be useful to me as a host for this kind of work.
    >
    > Just thinking out loud here, maybe the free (for a year) Micro Instance
    > in EC2 is the way to go, but I don't know if that's "big" enough for a
    > Java web-app. Anyone have experience with that?
    >
    > Any ideas or suggestions are appreciated. I'm looking to spend < $5/mo
    > if possible.  At this point traffic will be fairly minimal, and free is
    > best, but it has to work well enough when it is used.  I'm not concerned
    > about scalability at first, since when I do need to scale, I'll probably
    > be able to monetize at least a little and use that to pay for a real host..


    If you are happy grubbing about with Linux you could try looking at
    www.lowendbox.com for cheap virtual servers (some less than $5 /
    month). Java doesn't play well with OpenVZ so I'd avoid that, but Xen,
    KVM etc should all be OK.
     
    Paul Cager, Mar 19, 2012
    #3
  4. Daniel Pitts

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    On 3/19/12 10:06 AM, Knute Johnson wrote:
    > On 3/19/2012 9:59 AM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >> I've been working on my AT-Robots program
    >> <https://sourceforge.net/projects/at-robots2-j/>, and I'm getting ready
    >> to create a "Tournament Server" for it. Basically, what that means is a
    >> webapp where someone can upload their robot definitions to compete
    >> against the others that have already been uploaded. I think this is a
    >> necessary next step in order to start building a community around my
    >> project, but I don't really have excess capital to spend on an otherwise
    >> free project.
    >>
    >> I do have my own personal "server", but it lives in my house and isn't
    >> very "stable". I've also looked into nosupportlinuxhosting.com, and
    >> while I can get Java to start up with a *lot* of finagling, it doesn't
    >> seem likely to be useful to me as a host for this kind of work.
    >>
    >> Just thinking out loud here, maybe the free (for a year) Micro Instance
    >> in EC2 is the way to go, but I don't know if that's "big" enough for a
    >> Java web-app. Anyone have experience with that?
    >>
    >> Any ideas or suggestions are appreciated. I'm looking to spend < $5/mo
    >> if possible. At this point traffic will be fairly minimal, and free is
    >> best, but it has to work well enough when it is used. I'm not concerned
    >> about scalability at first, since when I do need to scale, I'll probably
    >> be able to monetize at least a little and use that to pay for a real
    >> host.
    >>
    >> Thanks everyone,
    >> Daniel.

    >
    > What exactly to you mean by Java hosting?
    >


    Well, the two features I really need are the ability to run Java apps
    (webapps or otherwise), and to have shell access (so I can manage the
    app's data directories).
     
    Daniel Pitts, Mar 19, 2012
    #4
  5. On 3/19/2012 11:04 AM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >> What exactly to you mean by Java hosting?
    >>

    >
    > Well, the two features I really need are the ability to run Java apps
    > (webapps or otherwise), and to have shell access (so I can manage the
    > app's data directories).


    You want to run a Java app in the server? I'm not sure what you mean by
    webapp.

    --

    Knute Johnson
     
    Knute Johnson, Mar 19, 2012
    #5
  6. Daniel Pitts

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    On 3/19/12 11:21 AM, Knute Johnson wrote:
    > On 3/19/2012 11:04 AM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >>> What exactly to you mean by Java hosting?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Well, the two features I really need are the ability to run Java apps
    >> (webapps or otherwise), and to have shell access (so I can manage the
    >> app's data directories).

    >
    > You want to run a Java app in the server? I'm not sure what you mean by
    > webapp.
    >


    Yes, a Java web-app, such as in a Resin or Tomcat application container,
    for instance. Also, it would be a bonus to be able to run a stand-alone
    Java process.

    The reason I say Java specifically is a lot of "cheap" hosting expect
    you to run short-lived PHP pages with minimal memory footprint, not
    long-running Java applications.
     
    Daniel Pitts, Mar 19, 2012
    #6
  7. Daniel Pitts

    Jan Burse Guest

    Daniel Pitts schrieb:
    > Yes, a Java web-app, such as in a Resin or Tomcat application container,
    > for instance. Also, it would be a bonus to be able to run a stand-alone
    > Java process.
    >
    > The reason I say Java specifically is a lot of "cheap" hosting expect
    > you to run short-lived PHP pages with minimal memory footprint, not
    > long-running Java applications.


    Hi,

    For what geographical region, where do you want your
    ISP to be located? You could use some yellow pages of
    the region and then check those out that have servlets.

    My experience so far is, that you typically don't
    get shell access, only secure remote copying. Which is
    enough for web applications.

    If you don't have shell access, then it becomes more
    difficult to spawn Java processes. But maybe you would
    be satisfied spawning threads inside a web container
    process.

    The later is actually possible, there is nothing in the
    servlet spec that prevents you from creating additional
    threads. But you would need to code your own job control
    so that your threads get found from servlet to servlet
    invocation.

    Best Regards
     
    Jan Burse, Mar 19, 2012
    #7
  8. Daniel Pitts

    Jan Burse Guest

    Jan Burse schrieb:
    > But maybe you would be satisfied spawning threads
    > inside a web container process.


    I guess the exec inside a web container might
    also be blocked.
     
    Jan Burse, Mar 19, 2012
    #8
  9. Daniel Pitts

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 3/19/2012 2:21 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:
    > On 3/19/2012 11:04 AM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >>> What exactly to you mean by Java hosting?

    >>
    >> Well, the two features I really need are the ability to run Java apps
    >> (webapps or otherwise), and to have shell access (so I can manage the
    >> app's data directories).

    >
    > You want to run a Java app in the server? I'm not sure what you mean by
    > webapp.


    A Java web app usually mean a war running in a servlet container.

    "Java web app" seems as common a term as "PHP web app" or
    "ASP.NET web app" to me.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Mar 20, 2012
    #9
  10. Daniel Pitts

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 3/19/2012 12:59 PM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    > I've been working on my AT-Robots program
    > <https://sourceforge.net/projects/at-robots2-j/>, and I'm getting ready
    > to create a "Tournament Server" for it. Basically, what that means is a
    > webapp where someone can upload their robot definitions to compete
    > against the others that have already been uploaded. I think this is a
    > necessary next step in order to start building a community around my
    > project, but I don't really have excess capital to spend on an otherwise
    > free project.
    >
    > I do have my own personal "server", but it lives in my house and isn't
    > very "stable". I've also looked into nosupportlinuxhosting.com, and
    > while I can get Java to start up with a *lot* of finagling, it doesn't
    > seem likely to be useful to me as a host for this kind of work.
    >
    > Just thinking out loud here, maybe the free (for a year) Micro Instance
    > in EC2 is the way to go, but I don't know if that's "big" enough for a
    > Java web-app. Anyone have experience with that?
    >
    > Any ideas or suggestions are appreciated. I'm looking to spend < $5/mo
    > if possible. At this point traffic will be fairly minimal, and free is
    > best, but it has to work well enough when it is used. I'm not concerned
    > about scalability at first, since when I do need to scale, I'll probably
    > be able to monetize at least a little and use that to pay for a real host.


    Google app engine for Java maybe!?

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Mar 20, 2012
    #10
  11. On 3/19/2012 6:34 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    > On 3/19/2012 2:21 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:
    >> On 3/19/2012 11:04 AM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >>>> What exactly to you mean by Java hosting?
    >>>
    >>> Well, the two features I really need are the ability to run Java apps
    >>> (webapps or otherwise), and to have shell access (so I can manage the
    >>> app's data directories).

    >>
    >> You want to run a Java app in the server? I'm not sure what you mean by
    >> webapp.

    >
    > A Java web app usually mean a war running in a servlet container.


    And a servlet would require Tomcat or something like it on the
    webserver? Do you need JavaEE to create servlets or on the server?

    > "Java web app" seems as common a term as "PHP web app" or
    > "ASP.NET web app" to me.


    I've run Java programs on my computer before that acted as a server.
    Managing them was a little difficult without creating a control
    mechanism but they worked fine.


    --

    Knute Johnson
     
    Knute Johnson, Mar 20, 2012
    #11
  12. Daniel Pitts

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 3/19/2012 9:56 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:
    > On 3/19/2012 6:34 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >> On 3/19/2012 2:21 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:
    >>> On 3/19/2012 11:04 AM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >>>>> What exactly to you mean by Java hosting?
    >>>>
    >>>> Well, the two features I really need are the ability to run Java apps
    >>>> (webapps or otherwise), and to have shell access (so I can manage the
    >>>> app's data directories).
    >>>
    >>> You want to run a Java app in the server? I'm not sure what you mean by
    >>> webapp.

    >>
    >> A Java web app usually mean a war running in a servlet container.

    >
    > And a servlet would require Tomcat or something like it on the
    > webserver? Do you need JavaEE to create servlets or on the server?


    Well known standalone servlet containers are Tomcat and Resin.

    Any full Java EE app server contains a servlet container.

    Servlet/JSP/JSF are a subset of Java EE.

    >> "Java web app" seems as common a term as "PHP web app" or
    >> "ASP.NET web app" to me.

    >
    > I've run Java programs on my computer before that acted as a server.
    > Managing them was a little difficult without creating a control
    > mechanism but they worked fine.


    It is certainly possible to run Java SE servers.

    Usually that means a a socket server with a custom
    protocol not HTTP.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Mar 20, 2012
    #12
  13. Daniel Pitts

    Lew Guest

    On 03/19/2012 07:03 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    > On 3/19/2012 9:56 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:
    >> On 3/19/2012 6:34 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >>> On 3/19/2012 2:21 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:
    >>>> On 3/19/2012 11:04 AM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >>>>>> What exactly to you mean by Java hosting?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Well, the two features I really need are the ability to run Java apps
    >>>>> (webapps or otherwise), and to have shell access (so I can manage the
    >>>>> app's data directories).
    >>>>
    >>>> You want to run a Java app in the server? I'm not sure what you mean by
    >>>> webapp.
    >>>
    >>> A Java web app usually mean a war running in a servlet container.

    >>
    >> And a servlet would require Tomcat or something like it on the
    >> webserver? Do you need JavaEE to create servlets or on the server?


    Tomcat (or something like it) is the web server.

    Yes, you need a Java EE-conformant server to run servlets. To create them you
    only need the right JARs.

    > Well known standalone servlet containers are Tomcat and Resin.
    >
    > Any full Java EE app server contains a servlet container.
    >
    > Servlet/JSP/JSF are a subset of Java EE.
    >
    >>> "Java web app" seems as common a term as "PHP web app" or
    >>> "ASP.NET web app" to me.

    >>
    >> I've run Java programs on my computer before that acted as a server.
    >> Managing them was a little difficult without creating a control
    >> mechanism but they worked fine.


    But those aren't "web apps".

    > It is certainly possible to run Java SE servers.
    >
    > Usually that means a a socket server with a custom
    > protocol not HTTP.


    And such an application is not normally called a "web app". The term "web
    app[lication]", as Arne says, is the conventional nomenclature for an
    application running in a web-based application server such as Tomcat or Glassfish.

    If you aren't familiar with Java EE, here are some good references to get you
    started:

    <http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/documentation/index.html>
    <http://tomcat.apache.org/tomcat-7.0-doc/index.html>
    <https://www.ibm.com/search/csass/search/?sn=dw&lang=en&cc=US&en=utf&hpp=20&dws=dw&q=Java+EE&Search=Search>
    <http://glassfish.java.net/docs/index.html>

    --
    Lew
    Honi soit qui mal y pense.
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cf/Friz.jpg
     
    Lew, Mar 20, 2012
    #13
  14. On 3/19/2012 7:25 PM, Lew wrote:
    > On 03/19/2012 07:03 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >> On 3/19/2012 9:56 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:
    >>> On 3/19/2012 6:34 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >>>> On 3/19/2012 2:21 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:
    >>>>> On 3/19/2012 11:04 AM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >>>>>>> What exactly to you mean by Java hosting?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Well, the two features I really need are the ability to run Java apps
    >>>>>> (webapps or otherwise), and to have shell access (so I can manage the
    >>>>>> app's data directories).
    >>>>>
    >>>>> You want to run a Java app in the server? I'm not sure what you
    >>>>> mean by
    >>>>> webapp.
    >>>>
    >>>> A Java web app usually mean a war running in a servlet container.
    >>>
    >>> And a servlet would require Tomcat or something like it on the
    >>> webserver? Do you need JavaEE to create servlets or on the server?

    >
    > Tomcat (or something like it) is the web server.
    >
    > Yes, you need a Java EE-conformant server to run servlets. To create
    > them you only need the right JARs.
    >
    >> Well known standalone servlet containers are Tomcat and Resin.
    >>
    >> Any full Java EE app server contains a servlet container.
    >>
    >> Servlet/JSP/JSF are a subset of Java EE.
    >>
    >>>> "Java web app" seems as common a term as "PHP web app" or
    >>>> "ASP.NET web app" to me.
    >>>
    >>> I've run Java programs on my computer before that acted as a server.
    >>> Managing them was a little difficult without creating a control
    >>> mechanism but they worked fine.

    >
    > But those aren't "web apps".
    >
    >> It is certainly possible to run Java SE servers.
    >>
    >> Usually that means a a socket server with a custom
    >> protocol not HTTP.

    >
    > And such an application is not normally called a "web app". The term
    > "web app[lication]", as Arne says, is the conventional nomenclature for
    > an application running in a web-based application server such as Tomcat
    > or Glassfish.
    >
    > If you aren't familiar with Java EE, here are some good references to
    > get you started:
    >
    > <http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/documentation/index.html>
    > <http://tomcat.apache.org/tomcat-7.0-doc/index.html>
    > <https://www.ibm.com/search/csass/search/?sn=dw&lang=en&cc=US&en=utf&hpp=20&dws=dw&q=Java+EE&Search=Search>
    >
    > <http://glassfish.java.net/docs/index.html>
    >


    Thanks Lew and Arne for the info. This isn't my area of knowledge but I
    was curious what Daniel was looking for.

    --

    Knute Johnson
     
    Knute Johnson, Mar 20, 2012
    #14
  15. Daniel Pitts

    Lew Guest

    Knute Johnson wrote:
    > Lew wrote:

    .... [snip] ...
    >> If you aren't familiar with Java EE, here are some good references to
    >> get you started:
    >>
    >> <http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/documentation/index.html>
    >> <http://tomcat.apache.org/tomcat-7.0-doc/index.html>
    >> <https://www.ibm.com/search/csass/search/?sn=dw&lang=en&cc=US&en=utf&hpp=20&dws=dw&q=Java+EE&Search=Search>
    >>
    >> <http://glassfish.java.net/docs/index.html>
    >>

    >
    > Thanks Lew and Arne for the info. This isn't my area of knowledge but I
    > was curious what Daniel was looking for.


    Extra note:

    Tomcat is significantly more lightweight [*] than full-fledged app servers like Glassfish, Geronimo or JBoss. It supports servlets and related technology (JSP, JSF, Facelets) out of the box, given the right JARs in the classpath. JPA (Java Persistence API) works with Tomcat, as indeed it does with standalone apps, for all that it's a Java EE specification. (EclipseLink, Apache OpenJPA and Hibernate are the Big Three for JPA.) For that matter, youcan get EJBs in Tomcat by adding Apache OpenEJB.

    At some point you might want the full Monty: all the acronyms from CDI to WS. That's when you reach for the heavyweight [*] servers. It doesn't hurt that the full-spec servers like the three mentioned all have dashboards to control everything from server configuration to logging to class loaders to database connections to ...

    I've found in practice that Tomcat plus JPA and JSF/Facelets does pretty much everything you need, unless you want to put httpd in front of Tomcat, which is really a good idea. There are use cases for the big guns, but I'm hard pressed to come up with a compelling one.

    --
    Lew
     
    Lew, Mar 20, 2012
    #15
  16. On 3/19/2012 10:25 PM, Lew wrote:
    > On 03/19/2012 07:03 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >> On 3/19/2012 9:56 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:
    >>> On 3/19/2012 6:34 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >>>> On 3/19/2012 2:21 PM, Knute Johnson wrote:
    >>>>> On 3/19/2012 11:04 AM, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    >>>>>>> What exactly to you mean by Java hosting?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Well, the two features I really need are the ability to run Java apps
    >>>>>> (webapps or otherwise), and to have shell access (so I can manage the
    >>>>>> app's data directories).
    >>>>>
    >>>>> You want to run a Java app in the server? I'm not sure what you
    >>>>> mean by
    >>>>> webapp.
    >>>>
    >>>> A Java web app usually mean a war running in a servlet container.
    >>>
    >>> And a servlet would require Tomcat or something like it on the
    >>> webserver? Do you need JavaEE to create servlets or on the server?

    >
    > Tomcat (or something like it) is the web server.
    >
    > Yes, you need a Java EE-conformant server to run servlets. To create
    > them you only need the right JARs.


    One does not need a full Java EE (pre 6) aka full profile Java EE (6+).

    >> Well known standalone servlet containers are Tomcat and Resin.
    >>
    >> Any full Java EE app server contains a servlet container.
    >>
    >> Servlet/JSP/JSF are a subset of Java EE.
    >>
    >>>> "Java web app" seems as common a term as "PHP web app" or
    >>>> "ASP.NET web app" to me.
    >>>
    >>> I've run Java programs on my computer before that acted as a server.
    >>> Managing them was a little difficult without creating a control
    >>> mechanism but they worked fine.

    >
    > But those aren't "web apps".
    >
    >> It is certainly possible to run Java SE servers.
    >>
    >> Usually that means a a socket server with a custom
    >> protocol not HTTP.

    >
    > And such an application is not normally called a "web app". The term
    > "web app[lication]", as Arne says, is the conventional nomenclature for
    > an application running in a web-based application server such as Tomcat
    > or Glassfish.


    It is the conventional term for apps that is accessed via HTTP.

    For Java that means Tomcat etc..

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Mar 20, 2012
    #16
  17. Daniel Pitts

    Arne Vajhøj Guest

    On 3/20/2012 1:14 PM, Lew wrote:
    > Knute Johnson wrote:
    >> Lew wrote:

    > ... [snip] ...
    >>> If you aren't familiar with Java EE, here are some good references to
    >>> get you started:
    >>>
    >>> <http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javaee/documentation/index.html>
    >>> <http://tomcat.apache.org/tomcat-7.0-doc/index.html>
    >>> <https://www.ibm.com/search/csass/search/?sn=dw&lang=en&cc=US&en=utf&hpp=20&dws=dw&q=Java+EE&Search=Search>
    >>>
    >>> <http://glassfish.java.net/docs/index.html>
    >>>

    >>
    >> Thanks Lew and Arne for the info. This isn't my area of knowledge but I
    >> was curious what Daniel was looking for.

    >
    > Extra note:
    >
    > Tomcat is significantly more lightweight [*] than full-fledged app servers like Glassfish, Geronimo or JBoss. It supports servlets and related technology (JSP, JSF, Facelets) out of the box, given the right JARs in the classpath. JPA (Java Persistence API) works with Tomcat, as indeed it does with standalone apps, for all that it's a Java EE specification. (EclipseLink, Apache OpenJPA and Hibernate are the Big Three for JPA.) For that matter, you can get EJBs in Tomcat by adding Apache OpenEJB.
    >
    > At some point you might want the full Monty: all the acronyms from CDI to WS. That's when you reach for the heavyweight [*] servers. It doesn't hurt that the full-spec servers like the three mentioned all have dashboards to control everything from server configuration to logging to class loaders to database connections to ...
    >
    > I've found in practice that Tomcat plus JPA and JSF/Facelets does pretty much everything you need, unless you want to put httpd in front of Tomcat, which is really a good idea. There are use cases for the big guns, but I'm hard pressed to come up with a compelling one.


    SLSB's are OK. You can do without, but why do something similar a
    non standard way when something standard exist.

    MDB'a are very useful if one need asynch stuff.

    And JCA is very useful if you need something besides
    HTTP in and database out traffic.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Mar 20, 2012
    #17
  18. Daniel Pitts

    markspace Guest

    On 3/20/2012 4:49 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:

    > On 3/19/2012 10:25 PM, Lew wrote:
    >> And such an application is not normally called a "web app". The term
    >> "web app[lication]", as Arne says, is the conventional nomenclature for


    > It is the conventional term for apps that is accessed via HTTP.
    >
    > For Java that means Tomcat etc..



    Well, I don't like picking nits, but "app" has become such a generic
    term (Apple iPad apps, Android app) and many of those apps are
    associated with the web, that I'm concerned that "web app" might already
    be a generic term. I did a double take on the original post and decided
    it really wasn't quite clear.

    "JEE web app" would have been clear, imo. "JSP/Servlet web app" would
    have been better, since Daniel seems to only need that part, and we all
    would have got what that meant.

    Just 2 somewhat pedantic nickels.
     
    markspace, Mar 21, 2012
    #18
  19. On 3/20/2012 9:05 PM, markspace wrote:
    > On 3/20/2012 4:49 PM, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >> On 3/19/2012 10:25 PM, Lew wrote:
    >>> And such an application is not normally called a "web app". The term
    >>> "web app[lication]", as Arne says, is the conventional nomenclature for

    >
    >> It is the conventional term for apps that is accessed via HTTP.
    >>
    >> For Java that means Tomcat etc..

    >
    > Well, I don't like picking nits, but "app" has become such a generic
    > term (Apple iPad apps, Android app) and many of those apps are
    > associated with the web, that I'm concerned that "web app" might already
    > be a generic term.


    The terms app and web app are part of a term hierarchy:

    app = web apps + smartphone apps + ...

    web apps = Java web apps + ASP.NET web apps + PHP web apps + ...

    smartphone apps = iOS apps + Android apps + WP apps

    etc.

    But web app means a HTTP server so smartphone apps does
    not fit.

    Sure there are some people outside IT that think:
    app === smartphone app

    But that is the same segment that call the PC system
    unit for the hard drive.

    Arne
     
    Arne Vajhøj, Mar 21, 2012
    #19
  20. On Monday, March 19, 2012 12:59:00 PM UTC-4, Daniel Pitts wrote:
    > I've been working on my AT-Robots program
    > <https://sourceforge.net/projects/at-robots2-j/>, and I'm getting ready
    > to create a "Tournament Server" for it. Basically, what that means is a
    > webapp where someone can upload their robot definitions to compete
    > against the others that have already been uploaded. I think this is a
    > necessary next step in order to start building a community around my
    > project, but I don't really have excess capital to spend on an otherwise
    > free project.
    >
    > I do have my own personal "server", but it lives in my house and isn't
    > very "stable". I've also looked into nosupportlinuxhosting.com, and
    > while I can get Java to start up with a *lot* of finagling, it doesn't
    > seem likely to be useful to me as a host for this kind of work.
    >
    > Just thinking out loud here, maybe the free (for a year) Micro Instance
    > in EC2 is the way to go, but I don't know if that's "big" enough for a
    > Java web-app. Anyone have experience with that?
    >
    > Any ideas or suggestions are appreciated. I'm looking to spend < $5/mo
    > if possible. At this point traffic will be fairly minimal, and free is
    > best, but it has to work well enough when it is used. I'm not concerned
    > about scalability at first, since when I do need to scale, I'll probably
    > be able to monetize at least a little and use that to pay for a real host.
    >
    > Thanks everyone,
    > Daniel.


    Have you looked into Heroku?
     
    Chris Stefanich, Mar 23, 2012
    #20
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