Which book is better, Core Java or Thinking in Java?

Discussion in 'Java' started by SteveSmith@nospam.edu, Apr 30, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Or is there something better for someone who is a beginner to Java?

    Is one of these two books better for learning Swing? Overall which is better for all the
    important topics?

    I've been using the downloaded version of Thinking in Java as a reference while reading
    another book. I've just started reading Chaper 14 "Creating Windows and Applets". I'm not
    that happy with it. Maybe I haven't gotten far enough into it yet but so far I don't think
    he tells you enough about what the methods do or even the purpose of the different classes
    like JFrame, JApplet and JPanel at least not at first. Maybe it gets better later in the
    chapter so I can't say for sure it's not that good at this point.

    Thank you.
    , Apr 30, 2005
    #1
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  2. writes:

    > Or is there something better for someone who is a beginner to Java?


    Thinking in Java is the best book for learning Java.
    Tor Iver Wilhelmsen, Apr 30, 2005
    #2
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  3. Guest

    Thinking in Java may be the best book,but for a freshman,it is not
    frindly enough.If it pay more attention to the basic concept,and think
    from the point of view of a new learner,it will be.
    , May 1, 2005
    #3
  4. Guest

    On 30 Apr 2005 23:56:22 -0700, "" <> wrote:

    >Thinking in Java may be the best book,but for a freshman,it is not
    >frindly enough.If it pay more attention to the basic concept,and think
    > from the point of view of a new learner,it will be.


    I also think it should be friendlier to a Java beginner at least in the chapter on Windows
    and Applets. I liked what I read of the other chapters. Would you recommend Core Java then
    or something else?
    Thank you.
    , May 1, 2005
    #4
  5. Guest

    On 30 Apr 2005 19:18:15 +0200, Tor Iver Wilhelmsen <>
    wrote:

    > writes:
    >
    >> Or is there something better for someone who is a beginner to Java?

    >
    >Thinking in Java is the best book for learning Java.


    Thank you.
    , May 1, 2005
    #5
  6. <>
    wrote on Sat, 30 Apr 2005 13:34:57 GMT:
    > Or is there something better for someone who is a beginner to Java?
    > Is one of these two books better for learning Swing? Overall which is
    > better for all the important topics? I've been using the downloaded
    > version of Thinking in Java as a reference while reading another book.
    > I've just started reading Chaper 14 "Creating Windows and Applets".
    > I'm not that happy with it. Maybe I haven't gotten far enough into it
    > yet but so far I don't think he tells you enough about what the
    > methods do or even the purpose of the different classes like JFrame,
    > JApplet and JPanel at least not at first. Maybe it gets better later
    > in the chapter so I can't say for sure it's not that good at this
    > point. Thank you.


    TIJ is by far the best intro book to Java. Stick with it.

    However, it does not describe every method of every class, because you
    have the Javadocs to look at already. You downloaded the JDK
    documentation, right? Open <JDKHOME/docs/index.html>, page down to the
    API & Language Documentation, and click on Java 2 Platform API
    Specification. Bookmark this page, you'll be using it every day for the
    rest of your life.

    If you really need excruciating detail about the internals of Swing,
    <Swing 2nd Ed.> pub. by Manning is a good resource, but until you're
    elbows-deep in the guts of a complex Swing app, you don't need it.

    --
    <a href="http://kuoi.asui.uidaho.edu/~kamikaze/"> Mark Hughes </a>
    "Gibson and I dueled among blazing stacks of books for a while. [...] The
    streets were crowded with his black-suited minions and I had to turn into a
    swarm of locusts and fly back to Seattle." -Neal Stephenson, /. interview
    Mark 'Kamikaze' Hughes, May 2, 2005
    #6
  7. Guest

    On 2 May 2005 01:52:41 GMT, Mark 'Kamikaze' Hughes <> wrote:

    > <>
    >wrote on Sat, 30 Apr 2005 13:34:57 GMT:
    >> Or is there something better for someone who is a beginner to Java?
    >> Is one of these two books better for learning Swing? Overall which is
    >> better for all the important topics? I've been using the downloaded
    >> version of Thinking in Java as a reference while reading another book.
    >> I've just started reading Chaper 14 "Creating Windows and Applets".
    >> I'm not that happy with it. Maybe I haven't gotten far enough into it
    >> yet but so far I don't think he tells you enough about what the
    >> methods do or even the purpose of the different classes like JFrame,
    >> JApplet and JPanel at least not at first. Maybe it gets better later
    >> in the chapter so I can't say for sure it's not that good at this
    >> point. Thank you.

    >
    > TIJ is by far the best intro book to Java. Stick with it.
    >
    > However, it does not describe every method of every class, because you
    >have the Javadocs to look at already.


    True. I haven't gotten that far with the Windows and Applets chapter but from what I've
    seen I think it explains less than what a book should. I think I will read through the
    rest of the chapter and see how it goes. I'll also use the tutorial. Another book would be
    helpful if I need it.

    > You downloaded the JDK
    >documentation, right? Open <JDKHOME/docs/index.html>, page down to the
    >API & Language Documentation, and click on Java 2 Platform API
    >Specification. Bookmark this page, you'll be using it every day for the
    >rest of your life.


    I've been looking at the API documentation since a short time after I started learning
    Java and I can see how useful it is.

    >
    > If you really need excruciating detail about the internals of Swing,
    ><Swing 2nd Ed.> pub. by Manning is a good resource, but until you're
    >elbows-deep in the guts of a complex Swing app, you don't need it.


    Thanks for the information and book suggestion.
    , May 2, 2005
    #7
  8. <>
    wrote on Mon, 02 May 2005 03:18:31 GMT:
    > On 2 May 2005 01:52:41 GMT, Mark 'Kamikaze' Hughes <> wrote:
    >> TIJ is by far the best intro book to Java. Stick with it.
    >> However, it does not describe every method of every class, because you
    >>have the Javadocs to look at already.

    > True. I haven't gotten that far with the Windows and Applets chapter
    > but from what I've seen I think it explains less than what a book
    > should. I think I will read through the rest of the chapter and see
    > how it goes. I'll also use the tutorial. Another book would be helpful
    > if I need it.


    There's also David Geary's <Graphic Java> trilogy, excellent books
    about the details of the AWT, Swing, and Java 2D. However, they're
    aimed at intermediate-advanced Java programmers with really difficult
    graphics problems, and make TIJ look gentle and chatty.

    > Thanks for the information and book suggestion.


    No problem. Good luck!

    --
    <a href="http://kuoi.asui.uidaho.edu/~kamikaze/"> Mark Hughes </a>
    "Gibson and I dueled among blazing stacks of books for a while. [...] The
    streets were crowded with his black-suited minions and I had to turn into a
    swarm of locusts and fly back to Seattle." -Neal Stephenson, /. interview
    Mark 'Kamikaze' Hughes, May 3, 2005
    #8
  9. Guest

    On 3 May 2005 09:48:19 GMT, Mark 'Kamikaze' Hughes <> wrote:

    > <>
    >wrote on Mon, 02 May 2005 03:18:31 GMT:
    >> On 2 May 2005 01:52:41 GMT, Mark 'Kamikaze' Hughes <> wrote:
    >>> TIJ is by far the best intro book to Java. Stick with it.
    >>> However, it does not describe every method of every class, because you
    >>>have the Javadocs to look at already.

    >> True. I haven't gotten that far with the Windows and Applets chapter
    >> but from what I've seen I think it explains less than what a book
    >> should. I think I will read through the rest of the chapter and see
    >> how it goes. I'll also use the tutorial. Another book would be helpful
    >> if I need it.

    >
    > There's also David Geary's <Graphic Java> trilogy, excellent books
    >about the details of the AWT, Swing, and Java 2D. However, they're
    >aimed at intermediate-advanced Java programmers with really difficult
    >graphics problems, and make TIJ look gentle and chatty.
    >
    >> Thanks for the information and book suggestion.

    >
    > No problem. Good luck!


    Thanks again.
    , May 5, 2005
    #9
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