Which to Learn: Javascript, Jscript, JScript.NET, ECMA 262 (3rd ed)?

Discussion in 'Javascript' started by John Bentley, Jan 29, 2004.

  1. John Bentley

    John Bentley Guest

    Note this is crossposted to comp.lang.javacript and
    microsoft.public.dotnet.scripting.

    After some Googling and FAQing my understanding of these terms is, crudely:

    Javascript (3 different definitions):
    1. The scripting language originally developed by Netscape. (I offer a Brief
    handle: "Original Netscape Script")
    2. The current implementation of the ECMAscript 262 (3rd ed.) standard by
    Netscape. (I offer a brief handle: "Current Netscape implementation")
    3. A generic term used to designate the continuly evolving standard and
    implementations.

    Jscript
    1. The current microsoft implementation of the ECMAscript 262 (3rd ed.)
    standard.

    ECMAscript Standard
    1. The scripting standard that is the current recommendation 262, 3rd edition I
    believe.

    JScript.NET
    1. Microsoft's implementation of ECMAscript (4th Ed).

    The definitions could be, and have been, debated endlessly. Do I have them
    essentially right? How is "javascript" mostly understood?

    Which do I learn? That is, and these are all newbie questions, when scripting
    your web site what implementation/standard should you use for reasonably wide
    browser compatiblity?

    Do you pick either of javascript - current netscape implementation OR Jscript
    Then be careful not to use implementation extensions that are not part of
    ECMAscript 262? Do you, when learning, start with the ECMAscript 262 standard
    and ignore the particular implementations? Is one implementation to be favoured
    over the other (netscape over microsoft)?

    Is one implementation regarded as having greater compatibility? javascript -
    current netscape implementation?

    Should JScript.NET be avoided like the plague as it based on a standard yet to
    be released and not even supported in IE 6.0?

    I am coming from the Dotnet/microsoft world. If I learn Jscript have I become a
    microsoft slave or is Jscript sufficiently cross browser compatible?

    I suppose too I have to know which version of an implementation I should code.
    This in turn is dictated by which are the current browsers you code for:

    Looking at http://www.doctor-html.com/agent_stats/

    It would seen that Netscape 7.0 and IE 5.0 would be sufficiently lowest common
    denominator. Are these the browsers you target?

    If one where to learn Jscript then
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/jscript7/html/j
    sconIntroductionToJScriptNETForJScriptProgrammers.asp

    would dictate no higher than Jscript 5.0 should be learnt? What current netscape
    implentation version should be learnt ( if you were to go down the netscape
    path) 1.2, 1.5, 2.0?

    You might be able to answer all these questions in one swoop??

    Thanks in Advance,
    John
     
    John Bentley, Jan 29, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. John Bentley

    bruce barker Guest

    you are correct.

    javascript 1.5 (ECMAscript 262 ed 3) is the current gold standard, that is
    implemented in most current enviroments (netscape, ie, flash., xslt, etc).

    version 1.0 - 1.2 varied mostly in dom (browser object) changes rather than
    the language itself.

    from 1.2 - 1.5 the main languages changes are in new date handling methods
    (for y2k compliance), encode replacing escape, and try ..catch blocks.

    version 2.0 addes the class extension that javascript.net implemented.

    I'd learn javascript 1.5, as javascript.net (2.0) is only supported by
    asp.net (or a standalone .net exe). Also 2.0 changes javascript from a
    typeless scripting language to a rigid typed language, requiring coding
    style changes.

    also if you try to write a javascript.net application, you will find there
    is no ide support, only a command line compiler. so for the .net world I'd
    learn C# (as javascript 2.0 looks like javascript with C# extensions), for
    scripting world I'd pick javascript 1.5.

    -- bruce (sqlwork.com)


    "John Bentley" <> wrote in message
    news:40199062$...
    > Note this is crossposted to comp.lang.javacript and
    > microsoft.public.dotnet.scripting.
    >
    > After some Googling and FAQing my understanding of these terms is,

    crudely:
    >
    > Javascript (3 different definitions):
    > 1. The scripting language originally developed by Netscape. (I offer a

    Brief
    > handle: "Original Netscape Script")
    > 2. The current implementation of the ECMAscript 262 (3rd ed.) standard by
    > Netscape. (I offer a brief handle: "Current Netscape implementation")
    > 3. A generic term used to designate the continuly evolving standard and
    > implementations.
    >
    > Jscript
    > 1. The current microsoft implementation of the ECMAscript 262 (3rd ed.)
    > standard.
    >
    > ECMAscript Standard
    > 1. The scripting standard that is the current recommendation 262, 3rd

    edition I
    > believe.
    >
    > JScript.NET
    > 1. Microsoft's implementation of ECMAscript (4th Ed).
    >
    > The definitions could be, and have been, debated endlessly. Do I have them
    > essentially right? How is "javascript" mostly understood?
    >
    > Which do I learn? That is, and these are all newbie questions, when

    scripting
    > your web site what implementation/standard should you use for reasonably

    wide
    > browser compatiblity?
    >
    > Do you pick either of javascript - current netscape implementation OR

    Jscript
    > Then be careful not to use implementation extensions that are not part of
    > ECMAscript 262? Do you, when learning, start with the ECMAscript 262

    standard
    > and ignore the particular implementations? Is one implementation to be

    favoured
    > over the other (netscape over microsoft)?
    >
    > Is one implementation regarded as having greater compatibility?

    javascript -
    > current netscape implementation?
    >
    > Should JScript.NET be avoided like the plague as it based on a standard

    yet to
    > be released and not even supported in IE 6.0?
    >
    > I am coming from the Dotnet/microsoft world. If I learn Jscript have I

    become a
    > microsoft slave or is Jscript sufficiently cross browser compatible?
    >
    > I suppose too I have to know which version of an implementation I should

    code.
    > This in turn is dictated by which are the current browsers you code for:
    >
    > Looking at http://www.doctor-html.com/agent_stats/
    >
    > It would seen that Netscape 7.0 and IE 5.0 would be sufficiently lowest

    common
    > denominator. Are these the browsers you target?
    >
    > If one where to learn Jscript then
    >

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/jscript7/ht
    ml/j
    > sconIntroductionToJScriptNETForJScriptProgrammers.asp
    >
    > would dictate no higher than Jscript 5.0 should be learnt? What current

    netscape
    > implentation version should be learnt ( if you were to go down the

    netscape
    > path) 1.2, 1.5, 2.0?
    >
    > You might be able to answer all these questions in one swoop??
    >
    > Thanks in Advance,
    > John
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
    bruce barker, Jan 29, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. JRS: In article <40199062$>, seen in
    news:comp.lang.javascript, John Bentley <> posted at
    Thu, 29 Jan 2004 22:59:47 :-
    >
    >Which do I learn? That is, and these are all newbie questions, when scripting
    >your web site what implementation/standard should you use for reasonably wide
    >browser compatiblity?
    >
    >Do you pick either of javascript - current netscape implementation OR Jscript
    >Then be careful not to use implementation extensions that are not part of
    >ECMAscript 262? Do you, when learning, start with the ECMAscript 262 standard
    >and ignore the particular implementations? Is one implementation to be favoured
    >over the other (netscape over microsoft)?


    For the WWW, use ECMA-262 Edn 3, but minus anything that you know to be
    incorrect or unavailable on not-too-old browsers, or different in Edn 4.

    An example is toFixed; recently introduced, and also buggy.

    Don't use a newer method if an older one is as good; for example, to get
    a 2-digit year, consider getYear()%100 rather than getFullYear()%100 -
    most users do have getFullYear, but there may be some who do not;
    getYear is deprecated, but should remain available for a good while;
    example is IMHO & subject to correction.

    Remember that, while all the kiddies have WinXP with MSIE6, there are
    others - charities, small business, big business, third world, redneck
    backwoods areas of the first - who are obliged to use older systems.

    I find the Netscape documentation, especially the older stuff, on the
    Web to be much nicer than Microsoft's; ISTM that using that NS stuff &
    ECMA-262, while testing on MSIE, is reasonably effective.

    You mentioned ECMA 4th Edn; what is its present status?


    Watch out for "localisation" problems - for example, it is by no means
    Summer here at present.

    --
    © John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 IE 4 ©
    <URL:http://jibbering.com/faq/> Jim Ley's FAQ for news:comp.lang.javascript
    <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-index.htm> jscr maths, dates, sources.
    <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> TP/BP/Delphi/jscr/&c, FAQ items, links.
     
    Dr John Stockton, Jan 30, 2004
    #3
  4. John Bentley

    Guest

    Re: Which to Learn: Javascript, Jscript, JScript.NET, ECMA 262 (3rded)?

    > After some Googling and FAQing my understanding of these terms is, crudely:
    >
    > Javascript (3 different definitions):
    > 1. The scripting language originally developed by Netscape. (I offer a Brief
    > handle: "Original Netscape Script")
    > 2. The current implementation of the ECMAscript 262 (3rd ed.) standard by
    > Netscape. (I offer a brief handle: "Current Netscape implementation")
    > 3. A generic term used to designate the continuly evolving standard and
    > implementations.
    >
    > Jscript
    > 1. The current microsoft implementation of the ECMAscript 262 (3rd ed.)
    > standard.
    >
    > ECMAscript Standard
    > 1. The scripting standard that is the current recommendation 262, 3rd edition I
    > believe.
    >
    > JScript.NET
    > 1. Microsoft's implementation of ECMAscript (4th Ed).
    >
    > The definitions could be, and have been, debated endlessly. Do I have them
    > essentially right? How is "javascript" mostly understood?


    The standard name for the language is ECMAScript. Nobody calls it that
    because it is such an awful name. Everyone calls it JavaScript, even
    though formally JavaScript is the name of Netscape's implementation of
    ECMAScript.

    > Which do I learn? That is, and these are all newbie questions, when scripting
    > your web site what implementation/standard should you use for reasonably wide
    > browser compatiblity?


    Learn the language. Stick to the standard. Make your stuff portable.
    Avoid proprietary features and traps. Keep it clean. Look at jslint for
    automated advice on a reliable common subset.
    http://www.crockford.com/javascript/lint.html

    > Do you pick either of javascript - current netscape implementation OR Jscript
    > Then be careful not to use implementation extensions that are not part of
    > ECMAscript 262? Do you, when learning, start with the ECMAscript 262 standard
    > and ignore the particular implementations? Is one implementation to be favoured
    > over the other (netscape over microsoft)?


    You want your stuff to run reliably as widely as possible.

    > Is one implementation regarded as having greater compatibility? javascript -
    > current netscape implementation?


    Again, keep to what is stable and common.

    > Should JScript.NET be avoided like the plague as it based on a standard yet to
    > be released and not even supported in IE 6.0?


    JScript.NET is irrelevant for browser applications. It isn't available,
    and if it ever does become available its share will be so small that it
    will still be preferrable to stay with the current stuff.

    On the other hand, if you are doing server applications, that is not an
    issue. I feel though that JScript.NET is a mess. JavaScript is a dynamic
    language. .NET is optimized for static languages. I don't like the
    changes they have made to the language to make it fit. If you are stuck
    doing .NET, you might as well be using C#.

    > I am coming from the Dotnet/microsoft world. If I learn Jscript have I become a
    > microsoft slave or is Jscript sufficiently cross browser compatible?


    Microsoft tried to supplant JavaScript with VBScript, and failed.
    JScript comes closer to correctly implementing its standard than any of
    Microsoft's other languages.

    > I suppose too I have to know which version of an implementation I should code.
    > This in turn is dictated by which are the current browsers you code for:
    >
    > Looking at http://www.doctor-html.com/agent_stats/
    >
    > It would seen that Netscape 7.0 and IE 5.0 would be sufficiently lowest common
    > denominator. Are these the browsers you target?


    It is no longer reasonable to support IE 4 and Netscape 4. It is good
    that Netscape 4 is going into extinction. It was a crime against humanity.
     
    , Jan 30, 2004
    #4
  5. Re: Which to Learn: Javascript, Jscript, JScript.NET, ECMA 262 (3rded)?

    "" <> writes:

    > It is no longer reasonable to support IE 4 and Netscape 4. It is good
    > that Netscape 4 is going into extinction. It was a crime against
    > humanity.


    To be fair to Netscape 4, it was probably the best browser when it
    came out. Most of the standards it fails to follow wasn't even
    formulated then, and it contained Netscape's ideas about how a DOM
    could be made. Not the best suggestion I have seen, but a suggestion.

    The crime was to let it live for more than a few years. It's continued
    existence has been a crime against humanity at least since 1999 (DOM 1
    was released in October 1998).

    /L
    --
    Lasse Reichstein Nielsen -
    DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleDOM.html>
    'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
     
    Lasse Reichstein Nielsen, Jan 30, 2004
    #5
  6. John Bentley

    John Bentley Guest

    Note this is crossposted to comp.lang.javascript &
    microsoft.public.dotnet.scripting. Responsing to both groups will be a help to
    all.

    Thanks Bruce, John Stockton, and Douglas for your educational replies. From your
    replies my understanding of the collective wisdom is:

    Q1. Given a concern for wide compatibility which do you code for?

    A1. The Standard (not an implementation): ECMA 262 (3rd Edition).

    Evidence:

    > John Stockton:
    > For the WWW, use ECMA-262 Edn 3, but minus anything that you know to be
    > incorrect or unavailable on not-too-old browsers, or different in Edn 4.


    > Douglas Crockford:
    > Stick to the standard. Make your stuff portable.
    > Avoid proprietary features and traps.


    Thanks Douglas for the link to jlink. Your site was one of the "FAQs" that I
    glanced over before this post. Great site. Thanks for publishing your hard won
    wisdom.

    Q2. Why not ECMA 262 (4th Edition)?

    A1. It's not ready yet.

    I'm just rolling on with your question John S:
    > You mentioned ECMA 4th Edn; what is its present status?


    I don't know anything other than it's not yet released as a recommendation. I
    get this information from that ...

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/dnscrpt/html/al
    labout.asp?frame=true

    .... talks of ECMAScript Edition 4 as "Proposed" and that at ...
    http://www.ecma-international.org/publications/standards/Ecma-262.htm

    .... we have a mere "3rd Edition".

    Q3. With the standard firmly in mind which implementation should I code in?

    A3> ?

    I will need some help here.

    Douglas you write:
    > Learn the language. Stick to the standard.


    Perhaps it would be saying the same thing if I take you to mean: "Learn the
    (language) implementation. Stick to the (language) standard"?

    Is there a "the" implementation?

    Bruce you do write:
    > javascript 1.5 (ECMAscript 262 ed 3) is the current gold standard, that is
    > implemented in most current enviroments.


    But I'm not sure if you are thinking more of which *version* of netscapes
    implementation you would choose. That is, it not clear that you are recommending
    a netscape implementation over a microsoft one?

    John Stockon suggests why one might prefer Netscape over Microsoft:
    > I find the Netscape documentation, especially the older stuff, on the
    > Web to be much nicer than Microsoft's; ISTM that using that NS stuff &
    > ECMA-262, while testing on MSIE, is reasonably effective.


    Is it Microsoft's or Netscape's implementation we ought code in? Is there a
    clear winner or is it more of a personal whimsy? Or is the choice unimportant as
    long as you stick to the standard?

    Q4. Which language implementation version should you code in?

    A4.i If it Netscape's implementation then Javascript version 1.5.

    Evidence:
    Bruce
    > javascript 1.5 (ECMAscript 262 ed 3) is the current gold standard


    If it is Microsoft's implementation then clearly *not* Jscript .NET:

    > Douglas Croker:
    > JScript.NET is irrelevant for browser applications. It isn't available, ...


    If we take the following to be true (which is consistent with my investigations,
    thanks!)

    > Douglas Croker:
    > It is no longer reasonable to support IE 4 and Netscape 4.


    Then we might suppose Netscape 6.0 and IE 5.0 are the lowest common
    denominator's we ought support. This might be especially true in light of:

    > John Stockton:
    > Remember that, while all the kiddies have WinXP with MSIE6, there are
    > others - charities, small business, big business, third world, redneck
    > backwoods areas of the first - who are obliged to use older systems.


    Therefore:
    A4.ii If it is Microsoft's then Jscript version 5.0.

    Evidence:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/dnscrpt/html/al
    labout.asp?frame=true

    IE 5.0 supports Jscript version 5.0

    Is there a link to show which version of Microsoft Jscript Netscape 6.0
    supports? If there is, and it can demonstrate that Netscape 6.0 supports Jscript
    5.0 then only Question 3 is essentially open (for me).

    Please do correct any thing I got wrong or important points I've missed. Thanks
    again.
     
    John Bentley, Jan 31, 2004
    #6
  7. John Bentley

    John Bentley Guest

    > Watch out for "localisation" problems - for example, it is by no means
    > Summer here at present.


    And while that might not be a problem in Switzerland in Surry I imagine it would
    be :)
     
    John Bentley, Jan 31, 2004
    #7
  8. JRS: In article <>, seen in
    news:comp.lang.javascript, John Bentley <> posted at
    Sat, 31 Jan 2004 07:29:36 :-
    >
    >John Stockon suggests why one might prefer Netscape over Microsoft:


    John who?

    >> I find the Netscape documentation, especially the older stuff, on the
    >> Web to be much nicer than Microsoft's; ISTM that using that NS stuff &
    >> ECMA-262, while testing on MSIE, is reasonably effective.


    You mis-appreciate. I recommend NS's documentation, and use an MS
    browser. If something is described in NS, and works in MS, then there
    is a somewhat greater chance of it working elsewhere than if one relied
    only on a single source.

    >Is it Microsoft's or Netscape's implementation we ought code in? Is there a
    >clear winner or is it more of a personal whimsy? Or is the choice unimportant as
    >long as you stick to the standard?


    One should hope to code in the common subset of completed-and-released
    code standards (ECMA 3) and current, recent, and future browsers.

    Sometimes, because of things having been implemented differently, there
    may be a commonly-implemented set of capabilities, but implemented using
    different code. Then, if one of those capabilities is needed, some form
    of how-to-do-it detection is needed, branching to different code for
    different ways.

    Wherever possible, the differences should be encapsulated in
    subroutines, so that the rest of the code can use a single superset of
    the common subset; cf. FAQ 4.15 and RC's new stuff probably at
    http://www.litotes.demon.co.uk/js_info/cljFAQ_Notes.html#AltDynWr

    --
    © John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 IE 4 ©
    <URL:http://jibbering.com/faq/> Jim Ley's FAQ for news:comp.lang.javascript
    <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-index.htm> jscr maths, dates, sources.
    <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> TP/BP/Delphi/jscr/&c, FAQ items, links.
     
    Dr John Stockton, Jan 31, 2004
    #8
  9. Re: Which to Learn: Javascript, Jscript, JScript.NET, ECMA 262 (3rded)?

    >>Learn the language. Stick to the standard.

    > Perhaps it would be saying the same thing if I take you to mean: "Learn the
    > (language) implementation. Stick to the (language) standard"?


    No, that would be saying something wrong. You are too concerned with
    picking the right implementation. If you are programming correctly, the
    implementation is irrelevant. (This is of course the ideal. The
    weaknesses of DOM standards and the poorness of their implementations
    fall far too short.)

    In any language, you should be working in the intersection of the
    language's documented behavior and the abilities of the most common
    implementations.

    http://www.crockford.com/#javascript.html
     
    Douglas Crockford, Feb 1, 2004
    #9
  10. John Bentley

    Jim Ley Guest

    On Fri, 30 Jan 2004 13:31:48 +0000, Dr John Stockton
    <> wrote:

    >You mentioned ECMA 4th Edn; what is its present status?


    I heard a rumour for january about 4 months ago... obviously it wasn't
    true.

    I've not heard anything else since...

    Jim.
    --
    comp.lang.javascript FAQ - http://jibbering.com/faq/
     
    Jim Ley, Feb 1, 2004
    #10
  11. John Bentley

    bruce barker Guest

    1) IE supports the com based JavaScript which is basically 1.5, the same as
    Netscape/Mozilla.

    2) when coding javascript for the browser, the dom differences are the main
    difficulty/incompatability.

    3) Javascript.net is a .net only implementation, and while the mozilla group
    was working on edition 4 (version 2), it unclear where this effort is now.
    Adding more XML support seems to have replaced this effort.


    "Dr John Stockton" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > JRS: In article <>, seen in
    > news:comp.lang.javascript, John Bentley <> posted at
    > Sat, 31 Jan 2004 07:29:36 :-
    > >
    > >John Stockon suggests why one might prefer Netscape over Microsoft:

    >
    > John who?
    >
    > >> I find the Netscape documentation, especially the older stuff, on the
    > >> Web to be much nicer than Microsoft's; ISTM that using that NS stuff &
    > >> ECMA-262, while testing on MSIE, is reasonably effective.

    >
    > You mis-appreciate. I recommend NS's documentation, and use an MS
    > browser. If something is described in NS, and works in MS, then there
    > is a somewhat greater chance of it working elsewhere than if one relied
    > only on a single source.
    >
    > >Is it Microsoft's or Netscape's implementation we ought code in? Is there

    a
    > >clear winner or is it more of a personal whimsy? Or is the choice

    unimportant as
    > >long as you stick to the standard?

    >
    > One should hope to code in the common subset of completed-and-released
    > code standards (ECMA 3) and current, recent, and future browsers.
    >
    > Sometimes, because of things having been implemented differently, there
    > may be a commonly-implemented set of capabilities, but implemented using
    > different code. Then, if one of those capabilities is needed, some form
    > of how-to-do-it detection is needed, branching to different code for
    > different ways.
    >
    > Wherever possible, the differences should be encapsulated in
    > subroutines, so that the rest of the code can use a single superset of
    > the common subset; cf. FAQ 4.15 and RC's new stuff probably at
    > http://www.litotes.demon.co.uk/js_info/cljFAQ_Notes.html#AltDynWr
    >
    > --
    > © John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 IE

    4 ©
    > <URL:http://jibbering.com/faq/> Jim Ley's FAQ for

    news:comp.lang.javascript
    > <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-index.htm> jscr maths, dates,

    sources.
    > <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> TP/BP/Delphi/jscr/&c, FAQ items,

    links.
     
    bruce barker, Feb 2, 2004
    #11
  12. John Bentley

    Jim Ley Guest

    Re: Which to Learn: Javascript, Jscript, JScript.NET, ECMA 262 (3rd ed)?

    On Fri, 30 Jan 2004 07:41:24 -0800, ""
    <> wrote:

    >The standard name for the language is ECMAScript. Nobody calls it that
    >because it is such an awful name. Everyone calls it JavaScript, even
    >though formally JavaScript is the name of Netscape's implementation of
    >ECMAScript.


    I think the name javascript is now sufficiently generic that we should
    stop the ludricous capitalisation used above - this will also of
    course help it further along.

    >Microsoft tried to supplant JavaScript with VBScript, and failed.


    I don't really agree with this, they produced a scripting language
    which their VB Monkeys would like, I still see it used a lot, also
    ActiveScripting was a great idea seperating the language from the host
    so anyone can write a scripting language for the browser isa good
    idea.

    >JScript comes closer to correctly implementing its standard than any of
    >Microsoft's other languages.


    I'd bet on C# for that one, but there's not much wrong.

    Jim.
    --
    comp.lang.javascript FAQ - http://jibbering.com/faq/
     
    Jim Ley, Feb 4, 2004
    #12
  13. John Bentley

    Jim Ley Guest

    On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 15:39:53 -0800, "bruce barker"
    <> wrote:

    >you are correct.
    >
    >javascript 1.5 (ECMAscript 262 ed 3) is the current gold standard, that is
    >implemented in most current enviroments (netscape, ie, flash., xslt, etc).


    JavaScript 1.5 was shipped without encode replacing escape... best
    not to use the JavaScript version numbers to describe other
    implementations.

    >I'd learn javascript 1.5, as javascript.net (2.0) is only supported by
    >asp.net (or a standalone .net exe). Also 2.0 changes javascript from a
    >typeless scripting language to a rigid typed language, requiring coding
    >style changes.


    JScript.NET can still be used typeless, it's just a lot slower. There
    is also nothing I've heard called javascript.net

    Jim.
    --
    comp.lang.javascript FAQ - http://jibbering.com/faq/
     
    Jim Ley, Feb 4, 2004
    #13
  14. Re: Which to Learn: Javascript, Jscript, JScript.NET, ECMA 262 (3rded)?

    >>The standard name for the language is ECMAScript. Nobody calls it that
    >>because it is such an awful name. Everyone calls it JavaScript, even
    >>though formally JavaScript is the name of Netscape's implementation of
    >>ECMAScript.


    > I think the name javascript is now sufficiently generic that we should
    > stop the ludricous capitalisation used above - this will also of
    > course help it further along.


    The name of a language is a proper noun. JavaScript should properly be
    capitalized. I think a case could be made for relaxing the 'S', however.
    'Javascript' weakens the visual association with 'Java', which might be
    a good thing.

    http://www.crockford.com/javascript/javascript.html
     
    Douglas Crockford, Feb 4, 2004
    #14
  15. John Bentley

    Jim Ley Guest

    Re: Which to Learn: Javascript, Jscript, JScript.NET, ECMA 262 (3rd ed)?

    On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 06:31:06 -0800, Douglas Crockford
    <> wrote:

    >The name of a language is a proper noun. JavaScript should properly be
    >capitalized.


    I would call it (when used to denote all ECMAScript implementations) a
    common noun, not a proper one, and therefore should not be
    capitalised.

    >I think a case could be made for relaxing the 'S', however.
    >'Javascript' weakens the visual association with 'Java', which might be
    >a good thing.


    That would be purely down to your style whether to pander to the
    trademark holders. I dislike it intensely, but generally follow the
    convention.

    Jim.
    --
    comp.lang.javascript FAQ - http://jibbering.com/faq/
     
    Jim Ley, Feb 5, 2004
    #15
    1. Advertising

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