How many languages do you know


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I thought Android is programmed with JAVA.
Or there is a new language "android"?

Android is an operating system, I believe written in Java, but do not hold me to that. If you wish to write for android, you generally do it on another computer loaded with Java. You write your code on your laptop or desktop and then export the code to your android device and see if it still works as well.

There is an asterisk, though. BASIC! a/k/a rfoBasic, available for free at android app store, runs locally on your android device and allows you to write programs that run on your device. Pretty simple to lean and write structured code, Well documented, tons of examples, active community. Unless you are sure you cannot sacrifice object oriented code, this may be all the language you ever need.
 
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BASIC
FORTRAN77, I think
PASCAL
C
Visual Basic
JAVA
Scratch
BASIC! = rfoBasic

have also messed around some with
C++
PDP11 assembler
Squeak
FORTH
php
 
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The short answer is LOTS!

I love learning new programming languages. I started out with various dialects of BASIC and Z80 assembly on old 8-bit computers (Amstrad CPC, ZX Spectrum, C64, BBC/Acorn etc.) when I was about 8 or 9 years old. I'm now a professional C/C++ programmer.

Languages I use most often are:
C,
C++,
Python,
Java,
Shellscripting (Unix/Linux/BSD using bash)

Other languages I've used in the past:
6502 Assembly
X86 / X64 Assembly (with at&t and intel style syntax),
Pascal / Delphi,
ASP / ASP.net,
C#,
Visual Basic,
Javascript (with the usual html and css ),
PHP,
Lua,
Batch-scripting (Windows),
Flash/Flex/Actionscript,
Unreal engine-script,
Lisp,
Ladder Logic (for programming industrial PLC's),
Several SQL-like database languages,
Several bespoke, in-house scripting/macro languages (at previous jobs).
There may be a few others that I've forgotten to include!

Many of the languages in the above list are ones that I had to learn "on the fly" for projects at previous jobs (C#,VB etc). Others (like Pascal and 6502 assembly) were used even further back when I was at school/college. But I've been in my current (C++ only) job for almost 12 years now. So a lot of the above list have probably been completely purged from my brain!

Misc:
In recent years, I've toyed with a few novelty programming languages like:
Chef - where programs are delicious recipes,
Arnoldc - where programs are composed of Arnold Schwarzeneggar quotes,
Lolcode - where programs are written using lolcat style leet-speak,
Brainfuck - which does what it says on the tin.

Not practical or productive programming languages. But it can be a fun challenge to try to code and debug even a simple program using them!

Still learning:
I'm currently trying to learn Ruby and Haskell - out of my own curiosity.
I also have Erlang, R, Rust, Scala, Clojure and Go on my ever-growing TODO list.
And I'm attempting to teach my kids to code using Scratch and PythonTurtle.
 
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I've been programming for over four decades... I've probably forgotten far more than I remember right now.

That said, Pascal, Modula, and Ada -- basically "Wirth" family languages -- remain my first love, even though my bread and butter right now is PHP/HTML/CSS/JS.

For fun though I still do x86 assembler, and am slowly coming to grips with ARM assembly. Thankfully with ARM there are so many education-oriented platforms to experiment with, from the "lowly" teensy 3/newer, right past the Pi, and up to powerful devices like the Cubieboard.

Naturally I had to learn C dialects because despite being an agonizingly and painfully cryptic train wreck of ineptitude, it's ubiquitous on nearly every platform. It might have memory leaks effectively encouraged by the language, cryptic operators and commands because "wah wah, eye dunz wunna type", and methodology designed to make the language slower than it should be on any modern processor, but at least ANY platform I sit down at there's a 99% chance there's going to be a C compiler for it... or a language that uses a similar syntax since so many other languages -- Java, PHP, JavaScript, etc, etc -- are nothing more than C tucking back Mr. Winky, tossing on a frilly dress and theatrical makeup, and going to town in five inch heels.

Still, IMHO Kernigan can go suck an egg: C is not my favorite language.
 
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