Server-side scripting in python

N

Nagarajan

Hi group,
I need to develop a web application. I am in a fix as to choose among
the various server-side scripting options. I want to explore python
(am a newbie) to gain expertise and upon search, I learnt about
PSP(Python Server Pages) that uses Jython as its scripting language.
Is it a better option over PHP or Perl? Could anyone point out the
pros and cons of using PSP over others?

Help much appreciated.
 
C

Cameron Laird

Hi group,
I need to develop a web application. I am in a fix as to choose among
the various server-side scripting options. I want to explore python
(am a newbie) to gain expertise and upon search, I learnt about
PSP(Python Server Pages) that uses Jython as its scripting language.
Is it a better option over PHP or Perl? Could anyone point out the
pros and cons of using PSP over others?
.
.
.
I suspect that several of us don't understand your question.

Python supports several--arguably, a plethora, more than any other
language--distinct "frameworks" for server-side scripting of Web
applications <URL: http://wiki.python.org/moin/WebFrameworks >.
PSP certainly is among these, although it's recommended <URL:
http://colorstudy.com/docs/shootout.html > less often than
several others. Is PSP better than PHP or Perl? First, do you
understand that PSP isn't directly comparable to PHP or Perl? The
latter two are languages, while PSP is a Web framework. In any
case, the answer is certain to be, "it depends". There certainly
are situations for each of PSP, PHP, Perl, and many other technol-
ogies.

I summarize: if you have an interest in practicing Python while
building Web applications, your prospects certainly are bright;
you'll receive abundant help from the folks here and elsewhere.
For us to provide more specific details about Perl, PSP, and so
on, meaningful to your own needs, will only be possible when you
articulate the latter more fully <URL:
http://catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html >.
 
N

Nagarajan

.
.
.
I suspect that several of us don't understand your question.

Python supports several--arguably, a plethora, more than any other
language--distinct "frameworks" for server-side scripting of Web
applications <URL:http://wiki.python.org/moin/WebFrameworks>.
PSP certainly is among these, although it's recommended <URL:http://colorstudy.com/docs/shootout.html> less often than
several others. Is PSP better than PHP or Perl? First, do you
understand that PSP isn't directly comparable to PHP or Perl? The
latter two are languages, while PSP is a Web framework. In any
case, the answer is certain to be, "it depends". There certainly
are situations for each of PSP, PHP, Perl, and many other technol-
ogies.

I summarize: if you have an interest in practicing Python while
building Web applications, your prospects certainly are bright;
you'll receive abundant help from the folks here and elsewhere.
For us to provide more specific details about Perl, PSP, and so
on, meaningful to your own needs, will only be possible when you
articulate the latter more fully <URL:http://catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html>.

Let me phrase my problem in a finer way.
I have done simple projects in python.
I wanted to explore web programming facet of python. The problem at my
hand is to develop an email web client. I've developed web
applications in PHP. I need to evaluate python-based web frameworks to
make a smart choice of the web framework or a language like PHP, Perl
based on performance predominantly. Do I make myself clear now?

Thanks for all the help extended.
 
C

Cameron Laird

Let me phrase my problem in a finer way.
I have done simple projects in python.
I wanted to explore web programming facet of python. The problem at my
hand is to develop an email web client. I've developed web
applications in PHP. I need to evaluate python-based web frameworks to
make a smart choice of the web framework or a language like PHP, Perl
based on performance predominantly. Do I make myself clear now?
.
.
.
In general, network latency is likely to dominate the performance
of a hobbyist-scale Webmail application coded in PHP, Perl, or
Python; to base your decision predominantly on performance is ...
well, it's not what I'd recommend. You might as well flip a coin.

Flipping a coin isn't such a bad idea; it's possible to write good
applications with any of PHP, Perl, and Python. Even if you restrict
yourself to Python, you can flip another coin and choose almost any
of its Web frameworks.

I salute your intent to choose a Web framework wisely. In the ab-
sence of still more detail about your situation, requirements,
constraints, ..., I don't know how to do so beyond what I've already
written.
 
N

Nagarajan

.
.
.
In general, network latency is likely to dominate the performance
of a hobbyist-scale Webmail application coded in PHP, Perl, orPython; to base your decision predominantly on performance is ...
well, it's not what I'd recommend. You might as well flip a coin.

Flipping a coin isn't such a bad idea; it's possible to write good
applications with any of PHP, Perl, andPython. Even if you restrict
yourself toPython, you can flip another coin and choose almost any
of its Web frameworks.

I salute your intent to choose a Web framework wisely. In the ab-
sence of still more detail about your situation, requirements,
constraints, ..., I don't know how to do so beyond what I've already
written.

Django is intuitive and handy. I think I would go with that.
Any suggestions?

Thanks.
 
B

Bruno Desthuilliers

Nagarajan a écrit :(snip Cameron's answer)
Django is intuitive and handy. I think I would go with that.
Any suggestions?

Yes : have a look at Pylons too. It's actually quite less 'polished'
than Django, but it's IMHO going in the right direction (as a matter of
fact, Turbogears 2.0 - another well-known Python MVC framework - will
be based on Pylons...). Django is clearly more oriented toward
content-management, which might not be what you want for this project.

My 2 cents...
 
O

olive

Yes : have a look at Pylons too. It's actually quite less 'polished'
than Django, but it's IMHO going in the right direction (as a matter of
fact, Turbogears 2.0 - another well-known Python MVC framework - will
be based on Pylons...). Django is clearly more oriented toward
content-management, which might not be what you want for this project.

this opinion about Django is a little bit dated (see http://www.djangosites.org/
and http://code.djangoproject.com/wiki/DjangoPoweredSites).

Django is really multi-purpose and is rarely use as a CMS, excepted
through Ellington CMS which is itself a commercial fork oriented
toward newspaper like publishing.

I would use Plone instead as a general CMS.

Olive.
 
B

Bruno Desthuilliers

olive a écrit :
this opinion about Django is a little bit dated

Possibly. I worked with pre 1.0 versions, then switched to other
solutions (there were things I didn't like that much in Django...
personal taste, not a criticism).
Django is really multi-purpose and is rarely use as a CMS, (snip)
I would use Plone instead as a general CMS.

I meant it was more oriented toward *building* CMS - not that it was a
CMS by itself.

And as far as I'm concerned, I would not use Plone without *really*
needing such a heavyweight thingie (and yes, I do have recent working
experience with Plone...).
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Members online

Forum statistics

Threads
473,836
Messages
2,569,750
Members
45,545
Latest member
rapter____0

Latest Threads

Top