Shortest path algorithm (other than Dijkstra)


T

ThanhVu Nguyen

Hi all,

I need recommendation for a very fast shortest path algorithm. The
edges are all directed, positive weights. Dijkstra shortest path will
solve it just fine but the if the graph is not parse then it takes about
O(N^2) where N is the # of vertices, too much for large graphs.
Furthermore, I don't need to know the all the path from a start point to
every other single vertex as Dijkstra would provide. Just the shortest
path from a start point to a defined end point.

What other algorithms I can use ? Thanks in advance,
 
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T

ThanhVu Nguyen

ThanhVu said:
Hi all,

I need recommendation for a very fast shortest path algorithm. The
edges are all directed, positive weights. Dijkstra shortest path will
solve it just fine but the if the graph is not parse then it takes about
O(N^2) where N is the # of vertices, too much for large graphs.
Furthermore, I don't need to know the all the path from a start point to
every other single vertex as Dijkstra would provide. Just the shortest
path from a start point to a defined end point.

What other algorithms I can use ? Thanks in advance,


What if I allow approximation shortest path , other than A* , any other
known approx shortest path algorithm ? Thanks,
 
N

nl

What if I allow approximation shortest path , other than A* , any other
known approx shortest path algorithm ? Thanks,

Try googling on Depth First Search and/or Breadth First Search
 
R

rossum

Hi all,

I need recommendation for a very fast shortest path algorithm. The
edges are all directed, positive weights. Dijkstra shortest path will
solve it just fine but the if the graph is not parse then it takes about
O(N^2) where N is the # of vertices, too much for large graphs.
Furthermore, I don't need to know the all the path from a start point to
every other single vertex as Dijkstra would provide. Just the shortest
path from a start point to a defined end point.

What other algorithms I can use ? Thanks in advance,

Google is your friend:

http://www.nist.gov/dads/HTML/shortestpath.html

rossum
 
C

Carter Smith

A* can traverse 16km of 10m terrain data (real stuff like Idaho) in less
than 2 one hundredths of a second on a 3.0Ghz system even with doing post
processing to clean up the path (A* doesn't like large distances
apparently). After solving the problem I found a similar (probably faster)
solution in Game Programming Gems.

It's a very fast algorithm if you have a more advanced knowledge of linked
lists.

Ben Kucenski
www.icarusindie.com
 
P

Paul

Carter Smith said:
A* can traverse 16km of 10m terrain data (real stuff like Idaho) in less
than 2 one hundredths of a second on a 3.0Ghz system even with doing post
processing to clean up the path (A* doesn't like large distances
apparently). After solving the problem I found a similar (probably faster)
solution in Game Programming Gems.

It's a very fast algorithm if you have a more advanced knowledge of linked
lists.

Ben Kucenski
www.icarusindie.com

take a look at Floyd's algorithm, its for m X n, so I can't compare
the speed though.

-Paul.
 
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K

Karl Heinz Buchegger

Paul said:
[snip]
take a look at Floyd's algorithm, its for m X n, so I can't compare
the speed though.

According to
http://www.fearme.com/misc/alg/node88.html

int floyds(int *matrix) {
int k, i, j;

for (k = 1; k <= n; k++)
for (i = 1; i <= n; i++)
for (j = 1; j <= n; j++)
if (matrix[j] > (matrix[k] + matrix[k][j]))
matrix[i,j] = matrix[k] + matrix[k][j];
}

where n is the number of nodes.
Looks more like an O(n^3) algorithm to me.
 

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