TIEHANDLE and deep recursion


T

Tim Watts

Hi,

I was wondering of some kind soul could tell me what I am doing wrong in the
code below (one module, one test file, minimum case)

I can see why calling print $fh in "sub PRINT" is recursing - but I cannot
find out how to stop it!! Even copying the filehandle (a suggestion via
Google) seems to not work. I've played with "tied" and do not seem to be
able to find the magic to obtain the underlying filehandle so that calling
print() does not immediately redirect to sub PRINT() and thus recurse.



#### SafeFile.pm #####
package SafeFile;
use warnings;

sub TIEHANDLE
{
my ($self, $fh, @options) = @_;
my $data = {
fh => $fh,
@options,
};
return bless $data, $self;
}

sub FETCH {
my ($self) = @_;
return $self->{fh};
}


sub PRINT {
my $self = shift;
my $fh = *{$self->{fh}};
print $fh @_;
}

sub CLOSE
{
my ($self) = @_;
close $self->{fh};
}

sub safewrite {
my $path = shift;
open my $fh, '>', ;
tie *$fh, __PACKAGE__, *$fh,
(
path => $path,
);
return $fh;
}

1;
#### END SafeFile.pm #####

#### test #####
#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;

use SafeFile;

my $fh = SafeFile->safewrite('/tmp/wibble');
print $fh "Hello\n";
print $fh "World\n";
close $fh;
#### END test #####


% perl test
#### Result #####
Deep recursion on subroutine "SafeFile::pRINT" at SafeFile.pm line 23.
/bin/bash: line 1: 21037 Segmentation fault perl test

shell returned 139

Press ENTER or type command to continue

#### END Result #####


The purpose of this is to redirect a request to open ...., ">somefile"; to
open ..., ">somefile.tmp";

The filehandle $fh should be usuable normally with print etc.

On close($fh), somefile.tmp is closed, and rename()'d (an atomic operation
on Linux) to "somefile" - thus the target file is never in a half written
state at any point.

Any thoughts would be most welcome :)

Cheers,

Tim
 
Ad

Advertisements

R

Rainer Weikusat

Tim Watts said:
I was wondering of some kind soul could tell me what I am doing wrong in the
code below (one module, one test file, minimum case)

I can see why calling print $fh in "sub PRINT" is recursing - but I cannot
find out how to stop it!! Even copying the filehandle (a suggestion via
Google) seems to not work.

It works fine:

sub TIEHANDLE
{
my ($self, $fh, @options) = @_;
my $outfh;

open($outfh, '>&', $fh);

my $data = {
fh => $outfh,
@options,
};
return bless $data, $self;
}

you just really need to make a 'deep' copy of the file handle.
I think you also shouldn't store a reference to the tied thing in the
'tie object' itself. That will likely result in each of them referring
to the other. I didn't test this, though.
 
T

Tim Watts

Ben said:
Don't do that. Use a new filehandle:

use Symbol qw/gensym/;

my $tied = gensym;
tie *$tied, __PACKAGE__, *$fh, ...;
return $tied;

Also, you don't need all those * derefs all over the place, and the code
would be safer without them. Stuffing a bare glob into a scalar variable
is a bit of a hack, and you're better off sticking to globrefs
throughout. I think the only place you need to deref is the first
argument of 'tie'.

Ben

Awesome! Thanks Ben. I did come across one google result with gensym - but
for some reason it failed when I adapted it (the example was long and
structurally different) - guess I cocked it up.

I have implemented your method and it does the job just right. And I can see
the logic.

Initially, it seemed "wrong" to not tie to the actual filehandle, and I
assumed there must be a way to request the filehandle without triggering the
magic - but I guess not.

Many many thanks - I've been on this for a day and a half...

Cheers,

Tim
 
T

Tim Watts

Rainer said:
my $outfh;

open($outfh, '>&', $fh);

Hi Rainer,

I tried Ben's method and it worked.

I also tried yours and, again, big thanks - that worked too, for me...

Saved me much hair pulling :)

I spent some time trying to decouple the tie with "tied" but as you say,
pulling the internal reference of the tie'd filehandle just brings the tie
magic back into play.

Cheers,

Tim
 
R

Rainer Weikusat

[...]
The purpose of this is to redirect a request to open ...., ">somefile"; to
open ..., ">somefile.tmp";

The filehandle $fh should be usuable normally with print etc.

On close($fh), somefile.tmp is closed, and rename()'d (an atomic operation
on Linux) to "somefile" - thus the target file is never in a half written
state at any point.

An entirely different approach to accomplish this:

---------------
package SafeFile;

sub new
{
my ($class, $name) = @_;
my $fh;

open($fh, '>', $name.'.tmp')
or die("open: $name.tmp: $!");

${*$fh{SCALAR}} = $name;
return bless($fh, $class);
}

sub DESTROY
{
my $fh = $_[0];
my $name;

close($fh);

$name = ${*$fh{SCALAR}};
rename($name.'.tmp', $name);
}

package main;

{
my $fh = SafeFile->new('/tmp/ziegenwurst');

print $fh ("Ziege\n");
print $fh ("Salz\n");
}
---------------

This doesn't work with explicit close calls, a user is expected to let
the filehandle go out-of-scope once he is done creating the contents.
It also relies on the feature that the SCALAR slot of a glob
autovivifies like any other 'real reference', something which is
documented as

This might change in a future release.
(perlref)
 
T

Tim Watts

Ben said:
Conceptually the tied filehandle points to a different 'file' from the
non-tied one: a tied filehandle doesn't need a real file behind it at
all, and as far as Perl is concerned the object it's tied to is 'the
file'. So you have one filehandle pointing to a real file, and another
pointing to an object, and the fact that object copies data into the
file is just a coincidence.

In principle you *could* use just one filehandle, by untying it and
then retying afterwards, but it would be pretty awkward. For one thing,
you'd need to set up your TIEHANDLE method so that if you passed it an
already-constructed object it used that rather than constructing a new
one. For another, as Rainer pointed out, you'd've just created a
reference loop, and you'd need to explicitly break it before the object
would be destroyed.

Yes - it's all clear now.

I will re-read the perltie man page, but I have a strong feeling that
manpage is lacking in pointing out this - it was natural to assume one would
tie the actual handle and that's where it all went wrong.

Perhaps as a "newbie" to this feature I should contribute a documentation
patch :)
 
Ad

Advertisements

R

Rainer Weikusat

Tim Watts said:
Ben said:
Conceptually the tied filehandle points to a different 'file' from the
non-tied one: a tied filehandle doesn't need a real file behind it at
all, and as far as Perl is concerned the object it's tied to is 'the
file'.
[...]

I will re-read the perltie man page, but I have a strong feeling that
manpage is lacking in pointing out this - it was natural to assume one would
tie the actual handle and that's where it all went wrong.

This actually seems rather 'unnatural' to me: The idea behind the
tieing mechanism is that some kind of 'familiar' Perl construct (like a
hash or a filehandle) can be used to interface with some conceptually
similar 'other thing', the classic example being a hashed flat-file
database, based on a set of abstract operations defining 'a hash' (or
'a filehandle') not in terms of what it is but in terms of how it
behaves in reply to certain messages. This means that tieing a
filehandle which actually refers to some file implies loss of the
ability to use this filehandle to manipulate the file in the 'usual'
way using the built in filehandle-based file manipulation operations.
This may be ok if this filehandle is henceforth supposed to act as
mock filehandle interface object to $something_completely_different,
although I would rather avoid that.
 
R

Rainer Weikusat

Tim Watts said:
Rainer said:
An entirely different approach to accomplish this:

---------------
package SafeFile;

sub new
{
my ($class, $name) = @_;
my $fh;

open($fh, '>', $name.'.tmp')
or die("open: $name.tmp: $!");

${*$fh{SCALAR}} = $name;
return bless($fh, $class);
}

sub DESTROY
{
my $fh = $_[0];
my $name;

close($fh);

$name = ${*$fh{SCALAR}};
rename($name.'.tmp', $name);
}

package main;

{
my $fh = SafeFile->new('/tmp/ziegenwurst');

print $fh ("Ziege\n");
print $fh ("Salz\n");
}

Hi Rainer,

I did consider something like this - but more like a fully OO style where
the print/write methods would be implemented

Read: You didn't "consider something like this". But you can't help
the temptation to badmouth it a little using whatever empty phrases
happen to come to you head such as 'not fully OO style' (aka doesn't
reimplement half of the universe uselessly just to control
finalization)

[...]
I like the tie approach as it is less accident prone.

or "it is accident prone.
Background:

When I worked at Imperial College,
[...]

Now I work at Kings College London,

"I'm a varsity guy!"

Not that the stench wasn't pungent enough on its own ...
 
R

Rainer Weikusat

Tim Watts said:
Rainer said:
An entirely different approach to accomplish this:

---------------
package SafeFile;

sub new
{
my ($class, $name) = @_;
my $fh;

open($fh, '>', $name.'.tmp')
or die("open: $name.tmp: $!");

${*$fh{SCALAR}} = $name;
return bless($fh, $class);
}

sub DESTROY
{
my $fh = $_[0];
my $name;

close($fh);

$name = ${*$fh{SCALAR}};
rename($name.'.tmp', $name);
}

package main;

{
my $fh = SafeFile->new('/tmp/ziegenwurst');

print $fh ("Ziege\n");
print $fh ("Salz\n");
}

Hi Rainer,

I did consider something like this - but more like a fully OO style where
the print/write methods would be implemented

Read: You didn't "consider something like this". But you can't help
the temptation to badmouth it a little using whatever empty phrases
happen to come to you head such as 'not fully OO style' (aka doesn't
reimplement half of the universe uselessly just to control
finalization)

[...]
I like the tie approach as it is less accident prone.

or "it is accident prone" ...
Background:

When I worked at Imperial College,
[...]

Now I work at Kings College London,

"I'm a varsity guy!"

How come I'm not surprised ...
 
T

Tim Watts

Rainer said:
Tim Watts said:
Rainer said:
An entirely different approach to accomplish this:

---------------
package SafeFile;

sub new
{
my ($class, $name) = @_;
my $fh;

open($fh, '>', $name.'.tmp')
or die("open: $name.tmp: $!");

${*$fh{SCALAR}} = $name;
return bless($fh, $class);
}

sub DESTROY
{
my $fh = $_[0];
my $name;

close($fh);

$name = ${*$fh{SCALAR}};
rename($name.'.tmp', $name);
}

package main;

{
my $fh = SafeFile->new('/tmp/ziegenwurst');

print $fh ("Ziege\n");
print $fh ("Salz\n");
}

Hi Rainer,

I did consider something like this - but more like a fully OO style where
the print/write methods would be implemented

Read: You didn't "consider something like this".

What's got your goat?

I did consider something like this (I think I'd know) - specifically:

my $fobj = SafeFile->new(filename, options...);

$obj->print(Blah);

$obj->abort(); # Backs out of the final rename and deletes the tmp file.

$obj->close();
But you can't help
the temptation to badmouth it a little using whatever empty phrases
happen to come to you head such as 'not fully OO style' (aka doesn't
reimplement half of the universe uselessly just to control
finalization)

I am not "badmouthing" it - it is a valid solution. However, for the
situation I have, I feel that the tie() solution fits better.

You said: "This doesn't work with explicit close calls"

This is exactly the type of error I am guarding against - this framework is
designed to be fairly strict in use and it is not improbable that *someone
else* programming against it might make the error of calling "close $fh"
because it is normal to them.


[...]
I like the tie approach as it is less accident prone.

or "it is accident prone" ...
Background:

When I worked at Imperial College,
[...]

Now I work at Kings College London,

"I'm a varsity guy!"

How come I'm not surprised ...

What's that supposed to mean? I appreciate the good ideas you have suggested
- and your explanation did help me to understand the internal mechanics of
tie. But there is really no need to throw a strop. My job requires me to
work with and configure and understand dozens of major software packages as
well as the OS, VMWare, bits of python and god knows what else. Most of
those I am aiming to be 70% competant in - sorry I cannot manage 100% on all
of them, including perl!!



Tim
 
R

Rainer Weikusat

Tim Watts said:
Rainer said:
Tim Watts said:
Rainer Weikusat wrote:
An entirely different approach to accomplish this:

---------------
package SafeFile;

sub new
{
my ($class, $name) = @_;
my $fh;

open($fh, '>', $name.'.tmp')
or die("open: $name.tmp: $!");

${*$fh{SCALAR}} = $name;
return bless($fh, $class);
}

sub DESTROY
{
my $fh = $_[0];
my $name;

close($fh);

$name = ${*$fh{SCALAR}};
rename($name.'.tmp', $name);
}

package main;

{
my $fh = SafeFile->new('/tmp/ziegenwurst');

print $fh ("Ziege\n");
print $fh ("Salz\n");
}

Hi Rainer,

I did consider something like this - but more like a fully OO style where
the print/write methods would be implemented

Read: You didn't "consider something like this".

What's got your goat?

I did consider something like this (I think I'd know) - specifically:

my $fobj = SafeFile->new(filename, options...);

$obj->print(Blah);

As I already wrote: You didn't. And you wouldn't ever ...
Apart from that, I'm not interested in this pissing contest.
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top