2.0: newbie: anonymous access and IUSR_ account

Discussion in 'ASP .Net Security' started by R.A.M., Nov 8, 2006.

  1. R.A.M.

    R.A.M. Guest

    Hello,
    I am learning .NET 2.0 and I have a question - could anyone explain me the
    following sentence from the ASP.NET eBook:
    "The default method of access to a Web application is anonymous access.
    Anonymous users are granted access
    through the Windows IUSER_machinename user account."
    I don't understand the role of IUSR_machinename user. How is it used?
    Please help.
    /RAM/
     
    R.A.M., Nov 8, 2006
    #1
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  2. Re: newbie: anonymous access and IUSR_ account

    The role is basically as a limited guest user. When an anonymous connection
    comes in, it has to authenticate against some acount on the computer. The
    IUSR_machinename (where machinename is the name of the computer the account
    runs on) is the default user for any request that is made through the web
    server. If the IUSR account doesn't have access to a file/directory being
    requested by the user, IIS will then prompt them for authentication and once
    they enter a username/password it will check to see if that user has access
    to the resouce. ASP.Net though, runs under a different account, the ASPNET
    user account. IUSR will be used for everything else pretty much including
    classic ASP.

    --
    Hope this helps,
    Mark Fitzpatrick
    Former Microsoft FrontPage MVP 199?-2006


    "R.A.M." <> wrote in message
    news:eitc10$ers$...
    > Hello,
    > I am learning .NET 2.0 and I have a question - could anyone explain me the
    > following sentence from the ASP.NET eBook:
    > "The default method of access to a Web application is anonymous access.
    > Anonymous users are granted access
    > through the Windows IUSER_machinename user account."
    > I don't understand the role of IUSR_machinename user. How is it used?
    > Please help.
    > /RAM/
    >
     
    Mark Fitzpatrick, Nov 16, 2006
    #2
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  3. Re: newbie: anonymous access and IUSR_ account

    Hi

    IUSER means internet user. In other words it is any user that is seated
    at the computer and using the internet with a web browser. So you can
    ignore thiat.

    To enable people to view the web site that you have made on IIS - you
    must select "basic authentication". Then you must assign an
    administrator account to use for public access. Next create a very
    simple password and give it to internet users that you want to use your
    site.

    Hope this helps
    The Grand Master

    Mark Fitzpatrick wrote:
    > The role is basically as a limited guest user. When an anonymous connection
    > comes in, it has to authenticate against some acount on the computer. The
    > IUSR_machinename (where machinename is the name of the computer the account
    > runs on) is the default user for any request that is made through the web
    > server. If the IUSR account doesn't have access to a file/directory being
    > requested by the user, IIS will then prompt them for authentication and once
    > they enter a username/password it will check to see if that user has access
    > to the resouce. ASP.Net though, runs under a different account, the ASPNET
    > user account. IUSR will be used for everything else pretty much including
    > classic ASP.
    >
    > --
    > Hope this helps,
    > Mark Fitzpatrick
    > Former Microsoft FrontPage MVP 199?-2006
    >
    >
    > "R.A.M." <> wrote in message
    > news:eitc10$ers$...
    > > Hello,
    > > I am learning .NET 2.0 and I have a question - could anyone explain me the
    > > following sentence from the ASP.NET eBook:
    > > "The default method of access to a Web application is anonymous access.
    > > Anonymous users are granted access
    > > through the Windows IUSER_machinename user account."
    > > I don't understand the role of IUSR_machinename user. How is it used?
    > > Please help.
    > > /RAM/
    > >
     
    Master Programmer, Nov 16, 2006
    #3
  4. Re: newbie: anonymous access and IUSR_ account

    Hi

    IUSER means internet user. In other words it is any user that is seated
    at the computer and using the internet with a web browser. So you can
    ignore thiat.

    To enable people to view the web site that you have made on IIS - you
    must select "basic authentication". Then you must assign an
    administrator account to use for public access. Next create a very
    simple password and give it to internet users that you want to use your
    site.

    Hope this helps
    The Grand Master

    Mark Fitzpatrick wrote:
    > The role is basically as a limited guest user. When an anonymous connection
    > comes in, it has to authenticate against some acount on the computer. The
    > IUSR_machinename (where machinename is the name of the computer the account
    > runs on) is the default user for any request that is made through the web
    > server. If the IUSR account doesn't have access to a file/directory being
    > requested by the user, IIS will then prompt them for authentication and once
    > they enter a username/password it will check to see if that user has access
    > to the resouce. ASP.Net though, runs under a different account, the ASPNET
    > user account. IUSR will be used for everything else pretty much including
    > classic ASP.
    >
    > --
    > Hope this helps,
    > Mark Fitzpatrick
    > Former Microsoft FrontPage MVP 199?-2006
    >
    >
    > "R.A.M." <> wrote in message
    > news:eitc10$ers$...
    > > Hello,
    > > I am learning .NET 2.0 and I have a question - could anyone explain me the
    > > following sentence from the ASP.NET eBook:
    > > "The default method of access to a Web application is anonymous access.
    > > Anonymous users are granted access
    > > through the Windows IUSER_machinename user account."
    > > I don't understand the role of IUSR_machinename user. How is it used?
    > > Please help.
    > > /RAM/
    > >
     
    Master Programmer, Nov 16, 2006
    #4
  5. Re: newbie: anonymous access and IUSR_ account

    Mark Fitzpatrick wrote:
    > The role is basically as a limited guest user. When an anonymous connection
    > comes in, it has to authenticate against some acount on the computer. The
    > IUSR_machinename (where machinename is the name of the computer the account
    > runs on) is the default user for any request that is made through the web
    > server. If the IUSR account doesn't have access to a file/directory being
    > requested by the user, IIS will then prompt them for authentication and once
    > they enter a username/password it will check to see if that user has access
    > to the resouce. ASP.Net though, runs under a different account, the ASPNET
    > user account. IUSR will be used for everything else pretty much including
    > classic ASP.
    >
    > --
    > Hope this helps,
    > Mark Fitzpatrick
    > Former Microsoft FrontPage MVP 199?-2006
    >
    >
    > "R.A.M." <> wrote in message
    > news:eitc10$ers$...
    > > Hello,
    > > I am learning .NET 2.0 and I have a question - could anyone explain me the
    > > following sentence from the ASP.NET eBook:
    > > "The default method of access to a Web application is anonymous access.
    > > Anonymous users are granted access
    > > through the Windows IUSER_machinename user account."
    > > I don't understand the role of IUSR_machinename user. How is it used?
    > > Please help.
    > > /RAM/
    > >
     
    Master Programmer, Nov 16, 2006
    #5
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