Website cleanup

Discussion in 'HTML' started by RICHARD BROMBERG, Jun 7, 2006.

  1. A couple of years ago I was tasked with maintaing a web site that had been
    built by someone else. I am using Frontpage 2000.

    Their work habits were no better than mine and now there are dozens of
    images that were uploaded to the Host and likewise dozens of old HTML files
    that are completely orphaned, i.e. nothing references them.

    Does anyone have a suggestion or know of a utility that will identify these
    unused files so I can clean up the site.
     
    RICHARD BROMBERG, Jun 7, 2006
    #1
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  2. On Wed, 7 Jun 2006, RICHARD BROMBERG wrote:

    > Their work habits were no better than mine and now there are dozens
    > of images that were uploaded to the Host and likewise dozens of old
    > HTML files that are completely orphaned, i.e. nothing references
    > them.
    >
    > Does anyone have a suggestion or know of a utility that will
    > identify these unused files so I can clean up the site.


    Recent versions of Xenu link checker can do that
    http://home.snafu.de/tilman/xenulink.html

    A fast and generally recommended link checker, but it has some known
    shortcomings. It uses Windows' own routines for accessing URLs, and
    they perform some silent fixups (e.g correcting "\" to "/") before the
    link checker gets to see them, which means those kind of broken link
    cannot be found.

    See http://members.chello.nl/f.visser3/xenu/10-orphaned-files.html for
    thirdparty documentation.

    However, a comment I found elsewhere says that the ophan check doesn't
    recognise images that are only called-out from a stylesheet.


    Personally, when getting rid of believed-to-be-orphaned files, I
    set their filemode on the server so that the HTTPD cannot read them,
    and then watch out for any corresponding errors in the logs for a
    while, before finally deleting them. That way, it's easy to reinstate
    any that weren't really orphaned.

    h t h
     
    Alan J. Flavell, Jun 7, 2006
    #2
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  3. Alan

    The Mcafee Site Advisor warns that http://home.snafu.de/tilman/xenulink.html
    will download unwanted spyware, and other junk so I don't think I will use
    it.

    Mcafee Site Advisor is a free download that rates websites for safety.

    Check it out.




    "Alan J. Flavell" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Wed, 7 Jun 2006, RICHARD BROMBERG wrote:
    >
    > > Their work habits were no better than mine and now there are dozens
    > > of images that were uploaded to the Host and likewise dozens of old
    > > HTML files that are completely orphaned, i.e. nothing references
    > > them.
    > >
    > > Does anyone have a suggestion or know of a utility that will
    > > identify these unused files so I can clean up the site.

    >
    > Recent versions of Xenu link checker can do that
    > http://home.snafu.de/tilman/xenulink.html
    >
    > A fast and generally recommended link checker, but it has some known
    > shortcomings. It uses Windows' own routines for accessing URLs, and
    > they perform some silent fixups (e.g correcting "\" to "/") before the
    > link checker gets to see them, which means those kind of broken link
    > cannot be found.
    >
    > See http://members.chello.nl/f.visser3/xenu/10-orphaned-files.html for
    > thirdparty documentation.
    >
    > However, a comment I found elsewhere says that the ophan check doesn't
    > recognise images that are only called-out from a stylesheet.
    >
    >
    > Personally, when getting rid of believed-to-be-orphaned files, I
    > set their filemode on the server so that the HTTPD cannot read them,
    > and then watch out for any corresponding errors in the logs for a
    > while, before finally deleting them. That way, it's easy to reinstate
    > any that weren't really orphaned.
    >
    > h t h
     
    RICHARD BROMBERG, Jun 7, 2006
    #3
  4. Thanks

    I like that idea better than permenantly deleting stuff.


    "Stan McCann" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns97DB563E6A4BBstanmccann@216.234.192.142...
    > "Alan J. Flavell" <> wrote in
    > news:p:
    >
    > > On Wed, 7 Jun 2006, RICHARD BROMBERG wrote:
    > >
    > >> Their work habits were no better than mine and now there are dozens
    > >> of images that were uploaded to the Host and likewise dozens of old
    > >> HTML files that are completely orphaned, i.e. nothing references
    > >> them.
    > >>
    > >> Does anyone have a suggestion or know of a utility that will
    > >> identify these unused files so I can clean up the site.

    >
    > > Personally, when getting rid of believed-to-be-orphaned files, I
    > > set their filemode on the server so that the HTTPD cannot read them,
    > > and then watch out for any corresponding errors in the logs for a
    > > while, before finally deleting them. That way, it's easy to
    > > reinstate any that weren't really orphaned.

    >
    > I do something similar. Rather than messing with file attributes, I
    > rename the files placing a common extension on all files. That way, I
    > can delete the whole lot in one go by deleting everything in the web
    > space with that file extension. I usually use a file extension like
    > 6.7.6 so somepage.html becomes somepage.html.6.7.6 and somegif.gif
    > becomes somegif.gif.6.7.6; same for jpg, css, php or whatever. Maybe
    > not better, but a bit different.
    >
    > --
    > Stan McCann, "Uncle Pirate" http://stanmccann.us/
    > Webmaster, NMSU Alamogordo http://alamo.nmsu.edu/
    > Implementing http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
     
    RICHARD BROMBERG, Jun 7, 2006
    #4
  5. RICHARD BROMBERG

    Stan McCann Guest

    "Alan J. Flavell" <> wrote in
    news:p:

    > On Wed, 7 Jun 2006, RICHARD BROMBERG wrote:
    >
    >> Their work habits were no better than mine and now there are dozens
    >> of images that were uploaded to the Host and likewise dozens of old
    >> HTML files that are completely orphaned, i.e. nothing references
    >> them.
    >>
    >> Does anyone have a suggestion or know of a utility that will
    >> identify these unused files so I can clean up the site.


    > Personally, when getting rid of believed-to-be-orphaned files, I
    > set their filemode on the server so that the HTTPD cannot read them,
    > and then watch out for any corresponding errors in the logs for a
    > while, before finally deleting them. That way, it's easy to
    > reinstate any that weren't really orphaned.


    I do something similar. Rather than messing with file attributes, I
    rename the files placing a common extension on all files. That way, I
    can delete the whole lot in one go by deleting everything in the web
    space with that file extension. I usually use a file extension like
    6.7.6 so somepage.html becomes somepage.html.6.7.6 and somegif.gif
    becomes somegif.gif.6.7.6; same for jpg, css, php or whatever. Maybe
    not better, but a bit different.

    --
    Stan McCann, "Uncle Pirate" http://stanmccann.us/
    Webmaster, NMSU Alamogordo http://alamo.nmsu.edu/
    Implementing http://blinkynet.net/comp/uip5.html
     
    Stan McCann, Jun 7, 2006
    #5
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