NumPy, SciPy, & Python 3X Installation/compatibility issues


E

esawiek

Hi All--

Let me state at the start that I am new to Python. I am moving away from Fortran and Matlab to Python and I use all different types of numerical and statistical recipes in my work. I have been reading about NumPy and SciPy and could not find any definitive answers to my questions, below. I had run into many mostly installation problems that I could never get NumPy or SciPy to work with Python 3.3 or newer. I am using Windows7 64 bit OS.
A few questions:
1. What are the latest versions of NumPy and SciPy that are compatible withPython 3.3 or newer and Windows7 64 bit?
2. What is the best source to download and install them on my computer?
3. Are they all installable on my OS w/o any major problems/addition?
4. In the long run, would it be better to use UNIX instead of Windows, if Iwere to use Python for all of my research?
Thanks in advance. EK
 
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Ð

Ðикола ВукоÑављевић

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Hash: SHA1

Hi All--

Let me state at the start that I am new to Python. I am moving away
from Fortran and Matlab to Python and I use all different types of
numerical and statistical recipes in my work. I have been reading
about NumPy and SciPy and could not find any definitive answers to
my questions, below. I had run into many mostly installation
problems that I could never get NumPy or SciPy to work with Python
3.3 or newer. I am using Windows7 64 bit OS. A few questions: 1.
What are the latest versions of NumPy and SciPy that are compatible
with Python 3.3 or newer and Windows7 64 bit? 2. What is the best
source to download and install them on my computer? 3. Are they all
installable on my OS w/o any major problems/addition? 4. In the
long run, would it be better to use UNIX instead of Windows, if I
were to use Python for all of my research? Thanks in advance. EK
For 64-bit Windows, I've had luck with installations from
http://www.lfd.uci.edu/~gohlke/pythonlibs/
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C

Chris Angelico

4. In the long run, would it be better to use UNIX instead of Windows, if I were to use Python for all of my research?

Yes. Absolutely yes. But that's because it's better to run Unix than
Windows regardless of all other considerations. :)

As a general rule, a Linux (I can't speak for other flavours of Unix,
but I expect they'll be mostly the same) system will tend to settle
into better performance the longer it keeps running, as long as it has
sufficient RAM. The things you use will tend to be in cache, but other
than that, nothing much changes as you seek toward infinite uptime.
Windows, on the other hand, tends to accumulate cruft; the longer you
keep the system running, the more RAM gets wasted in various nooks and
crannies. I can't be sure of whether it's the OS itself or an
application, but I do know that my Windows laptop sometimes needs to
be rebooted just because "stuff's feeling a bit sluggish", and none of
my Linux boxes are like that.

That said, though, my idea of uptime is measured in months. If you're
the sort of person who arrives at work, turns on the computer, uses it
for a day, and then turns it off and goes home, the difference gets a
lot smaller. (Unless you suspend/hibernate rather than actually
shutting down, in which case the difference gets bigger again.) I
still prefer a Unix system, though, because the worst messes I can get
myself into can usually be cured by SSH'ing in and killing some
process, which on Windows is both harder to do and less effective.

ChrisA
 
S

Stefan Behnel

(e-mail address removed), 10.05.2014 19:07:
Let me state at the start that I am new to Python. I am moving away from Fortran and Matlab to Python and I use all different types of numerical and statistical recipes in my work. I have been reading about NumPy and SciPy and could not find any definitive answers to my questions, below. I had run into many mostly installation problems that I could never get NumPy or SciPy to work with Python 3.3 or newer. I am using Windows7 64 bit OS.
A few questions:
1. What are the latest versions of NumPy and SciPy that are compatible with Python 3.3 or newer and Windows7 64 bit?
2. What is the best source to download and install them on my computer?
3. Are they all installable on my OS w/o any major problems/addition?
4. In the long run, would it be better to use UNIX instead of Windows, if I were to use Python for all of my research?

I concur with Chris that Linux is generally a better choice than Windows,
if only to get a nicely preconfigured system that makes it easy to install
stuff. Especially for "research" (assuming we're talking about the same
thing). If you say that you're "moving away from Fortran" on Windows, then
I guess you're aware how clumsy low level software development can be on
that platform and how tricky it is to set up. That could be enough of a
reason to switch platforms (assuming that's really an option for you).

Ok, if you use only the IPython notebook for all your processing needs, you
may not notice the difference in terms of interface all that much, but in
that case, why stick with Windows in the first place? :)

If you decide to use Windows, try Anaconda. It's an all inclusive installer
that comes with pretty much all of your scientific processing tools in one
package:

http://docs.continuum.io/anaconda/

There's a Py3.3 version.

Stefan
 
E

esawiek

Hi All--



Let me state at the start that I am new to Python. I am moving away from Fortran and Matlab to Python and I use all different types of numerical andstatistical recipes in my work. I have been reading about NumPy and SciPy and could not find any definitive answers to my questions, below. I had run into many mostly installation problems that I could never get NumPy or SciPy to work with Python 3.3 or newer. I am using Windows7 64 bit OS.

A few questions:

1. What are the latest versions of NumPy and SciPy that are compatible with Python 3.3 or newer and Windows7 64 bit?

2. What is the best source to download and install them on my computer?

3. Are they all installable on my OS w/o any major problems/addition?

4. In the long run, would it be better to use UNIX instead of Windows, ifI were to use Python for all of my research?

Thanks in advance. EK
 
E

esawiek

Hi All--



Let me state at the start that I am new to Python. I am moving away from Fortran and Matlab to Python and I use all different types of numerical andstatistical recipes in my work. I have been reading about NumPy and SciPy and could not find any definitive answers to my questions, below. I had run into many mostly installation problems that I could never get NumPy or SciPy to work with Python 3.3 or newer. I am using Windows7 64 bit OS.

A few questions:

1. What are the latest versions of NumPy and SciPy that are compatible with Python 3.3 or newer and Windows7 64 bit?

2. What is the best source to download and install them on my computer?

3. Are they all installable on my OS w/o any major problems/addition?

4. In the long run, would it be better to use UNIX instead of Windows, ifI were to use Python for all of my research?

Thanks in advance. EK

Thank you all. I checked the website suggested in on of the replies and it looks promising. Because I want to use Num, SciPy, and Python on windows just to be familiar with them a little more, then I do plan to migrate to UNIX. I will let you posted on my progress. Thanks again. EK
 
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M

Mark H Harris

4. In the long run, would it be better to use UNIX instead of Windows, if I were to use Python for all of my research?

I concur with Chris and Stefan. The *nix model is faster, cleaner, and
more secure. I prefer gnu/linux, but mac os/x is also quite nice. Simply
change... or, if you like, just switch.

I moved away from OS/2 and Windows in the late 1990s and have never
looked back; no reason to use Windows what-so-ever.

You're question (in the long run) is important, to be fair. Because, in
the short run there will be some learning curve, and there will be some
conceptual porting as well as code porting to handle; not to mention
apps. All critical apps from Windows, and most day-to-day apps have free
libre counter-parts in the unix world, and most everyday apps have gnu
counter parts and others. Just switch.

Proprietary code and systems will not survive the 21st century, you can
be sure of that. 'We' can never allow another Microsoft to rule again;
not google, nor canonical, nor oracle, nor anyone else. 'We' must have
net neutrality, and software idea patents must die (world-wide).

Go gnu/linux

Go Python

Go away, Microsoft, go away Oracle.


marcus
 
J

Joseph Martinot-Lagarde

Le 10/05/2014 19:07, (e-mail address removed) a écrit :
Hi All--

Let me state at the start that I am new to Python. I am moving away from Fortran and Matlab to Python and I use all different types of numerical and statistical recipes in my work. I have been reading about NumPy and SciPy and could not find any definitive answers to my questions, below. I had run into many mostly installation problems that I could never get NumPy or SciPy to work with Python 3.3 or newer. I am using Windows7 64 bit OS.
A few questions:
1. What are the latest versions of NumPy and SciPy that are compatible with Python 3.3 or newer and Windows7 64 bit?
2. What is the best source to download and install them on my computer?
3. Are they all installable on my OS w/o any major problems/addition?
4. In the long run, would it be better to use UNIX instead of Windows, if I were to use Python for all of my research?
Thanks in advance. EK
Building the scientific libraries on windows is very tricky because you
need a compatible C and Fortran compiler, as well as some libraries. The
usual and recommended route is to use python distributions where the
most used libraries are installed. You can still use pip to install
additionnal packages. You have a list over here:
http://www.scipy.org/install.html
 
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S

Sturla Molden

4. In the long run, would it be better to use UNIX instead of Windows, if
I were to use Python for all of my research?
Thanks in advance. EK

For scientific computing, a UNIX or Linux system is clearly preferable.
Most of the scientific computing software is built around the UNIX
ecosystem.

This is the reason many scientists prefer to work on a Mac. I have a UNIX
system ready to use in the terminal, developer tools are free, and it
stills runs all the deskop apps I need (even Microsoft Office). Apple even
provides us with highly optimized LAPACK, BLAS and FFT libraries as a part
of the operating system (Accelerate Framework). Even the free NumPy and
SciPy installers can link to Accelerate on a Mac.

Matlab runs on Linux and Mac as well. That is not s reason to stay on
Windows.

An alternative to a Mac is to install Oracle Virtualbox and use it to run
Windows or Linux. Windows as host tends to work best on a laptop. On a
workstation it does not matter.

If you are using Windows now and are happy with it, I would suggest you
just install Ubuntu into an VM with Virtualbox and forget about Windows
installers for Python, NumPy, SciPy, et al. Spend some money to buy an SSD
drive and more RAM if you need. The performance with Virtualbox is
excellent. Get a Python distro that uses MKL for faster linear algebra,
such as Enthought or Anaconda. Windows can be a great desktop OS because of
all the available applications. It sucks rocks for any coding or scientific
computing. But there is no law that says you need to use either. You can
have the best of both world's if you like.

Sturla
 

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