Python GUI?


L

llanitedave

I don't like the idea of being able to drag and drop anything in the programming world. Outside of that, I use D&D programs a lot. I got into GUI programming because I thought that I could get away from them, but I guess not.



Maybe I'm against them because if I can't code, I don't have anything else to do with my time. If I don't program, the only other thing I have to dois... well... nothing. So, because of this, they're making programming easier... by not coding as much. Oh well, guess coding is dead :(

Why do you feel the need to project your personal issues onto the whole world? Nobody is forcing you to use Drag and Drop -- you simply have the option to do so, or not. I don't use it either, but I sure don't fill up with angst just because someone else might actually enjoy using it.
 
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M

Metallicow

There are a few known GUI toolkits out there, and the main ones from what I can tell are:



Tkinter -- Simple to use, but limited

PyQT -- You have a GUI designer, so I'm not going to count that

PyGTK -- Gnome officially back this I think

wxPython -- Very nice, very professional, approved by Python creator, but alas hard to get started with



So, what are your personal preferences and why? Why use X over Y?



I, personally, really like wxPython, but I also really like Tkinter. I've messed with PyGTK, but I'd choose wxPython over it.



Have you got anything to say on what one I should be using(excluding PyQT because it has a D&D designer :mad: )? Is Tkinter really dead? Should I stick with wxPython?



It's might be similar to the "What language to use" argument, or the "What background to code on" argument(I prefer darker backgrounds xD Please don't argue about this though!), in the sense that there is *no* answer, just preference.

I prefer wx over qt for these reasons.
Robin works for qt now. *Funny isn't it...*
Basically, To change qt(PySide) you need to pretty much need to be employed by qt, not the case with wx(is not a *For profit*, but you can donate.).
In my opinion, in the long run(foreseeing from this point forward)
wx will win, because anybody can create a popular fork. And if it is good enough, it might get accepted into the standard dist also.

As far as "mature", well, the previous statement shows that he can make money doing it also and enjoy doing what he does in his spare time. I believe Guido has the privilege of spending half of his time "At work and getting paid for it." on python.
And Project Phoenix(Py2/3) is still on the way. We'll revisit this question next year.
 
M

Michael Torrie

I prefer wx over qt for these reasons. Robin works for qt now. *Funny
isn't it...* Basically, To change qt(PySide) you need to pretty much
need to be employed by qt, not the case with wx(is not a *For
profit*, but you can donate.). In my opinion, in the long
run(foreseeing from this point forward) wx will win, because anybody
can create a popular fork. And if it is good enough, it might get
accepted into the standard dist also.

Qt is not a company. Qt is an open source project owned and sponsored by
Digia and also Nokia, though Nokia's participation will probably be
reduced now that Microsoft has bought Nokia. Two years ago, at least,
lots of code commits came from outside Nokia. Now, PySide was
originally a Nokia project when they owned Qt, and I know they did have
contributions from the community. I don't see any evidence things have
changed.

Your logical reasoning is certainly faulty on one point, however. Why
would you claim wx is forkable but PySide (or even Qt) is not?

Both are completely open source and free software (as in LGPL).
 
M

Metallicow

Sorry about that, nokia is/was.
qt was developed(IIRC) for phones. Someone made money. And a lot of it.
wx is a more or less a "free" project.
I don't use a phone anymore. If I had a touch screen phone and was a developer, I still wouldn't use one. I have my many reasons why...
 
M

Michael Torrie

Sorry about that, nokia is/was. qt was developed(IIRC) for phones.
Someone made money. And a lot of it. wx is a more or less a "free"
project. I don't use a phone anymore. If I had a touch screen phone
and was a developer, I still wouldn't use one. I have my many reasons
why...

Qt was first available back in 1995 from TrollTech, Inc. Qt was always
about a good cross-platform UI toolkit that made it possible to develop
rich apps on Windows, Linux, and Mac. Qt was one of the very first
modern GUI toolkits available on Linux. I used KDE 1.0, which was based
on Qt back in 1998, long before cell phones with touch screens! In fact
I owe the KDE and Qt developers a debt of gratitude because KDE 1.0 was
really the first desktop that was usable to me as a Windows 95 refuge.
Moved to Linux and haven't looked back.

Qt only recently got touch stuff added, that make it work on phones and
tablets. And the same touch stuff is going into GTK+, and I'm sure wx
will get it too soon, if they want to stay relevant.

And yes someone made money on Qt back in the day, as the company
TrollTech developed and marketed the toolkit for many years. Back in
the 90s, a dispute over the open source licensing of the Qt source code
led to the creation of the Gnome project and desktop, using what became
known as the Gtk+ library. Now, however, Qt is under the LGPL so it's
both free and open source in every way, and we are essentially reaping
the rewards of a very long and expensive development history, all for
free! Whether it was generosity or desperation, it does not matter.

So I'm guessing you don't use Linux either, since people including Linus
Torvalds have become rich developing Linux. Most linux development and
even governance is under the auspices of some for-profit companies. Yet
it flourishes and has remained a free and open OS, thanks to Torvalds'
foresight to choose the GPL as the license for the kernel, which evens
the playing field and regulates the corporate influence.

Sounds to me like you've never used Qt in any of its versions. I have
used Qt, GTK+, and wx, and they are all fine toolkits. My current
preference is GTK+.
 
R

Robert Kern

I prefer wx over qt for these reasons.
Robin works for qt now. *Funny isn't it...*

Lying about someone's employment is not very funny. Robin does not work for "Qt"
or even Digia, the nearest thing to a corporate "owner" of Qt these days.

https://www.enthought.com/company/team/devs/
Basically, To change qt(PySide) you need to pretty much need to be employed by qt,

This is emphatically incorrect, by your own example. Robin does indeed
contribute to the PySide project. Both Qt and PySide are both open to and
*driven by* contributions from the community.

http://qt-project.org/contribute
http://qt-project.org/wiki/PySideContributors

--
Robert Kern

"I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma
that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had
an underlying truth."
-- Umberto Eco
 
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V

vidarwilliam

I don't like it when you can D&D to position things. I don't understand why someone wouldn't want to write the positioning code, and have fun with the debugging. That's the best part about writing a program, in my opinion. I'm against D&D with programming, and I'm not sure why.

I don't understand people that also insist on writing code in notepad :)
GUI design is not for programmers, but for designers. But the first versionof a GUI can be made by a programmer, so they can make a working application. Then the designer can make the GUI work for the end user. Anyone that know about a better GUI kit than QT that works well with Python?
 

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