What I do and do not know about installing Python on Win 7 with regardto IDLE.


W

W. eWatson

My criterion for success is that it puts IDLE as a choice for editor on
the menu produced with a right-click on a py file. So far no response on
this has solved the problem.

I know it sets up that way on a 2.5 and 2.4 on other PCs I have.

I know at one time it worked on my 64-bit Win 7 PC, which likely had a
32-bit version installed on it. After something like six months of
modest use it stopped working as above. No IDLE choice.

I know by installing a 64-bit version, 3.2.2 failed the IDLE criterions
as described. No IDLE.

I do know that IDLE appears on the Win 7 Start menu, but, when used,
nothing happens. Well, OK, for about 3 seconds the Win 7 "working" icon
spins around then zip, nothing. Further, right-clicking on Properties
of IDLE (GUI) produces a tabbed dialog. It shows Start in:
c:\Python32\, and None for shortcut. There is a compatibility tab,
which I've set to Win7. I think there's a troubleshooter there too, but
I haven't used it. Under the Details tab, it shows Name: IDLE(Python
Gui).lnk. Folder Path as: c:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Start...
Nothing after the "...". Attributes: A

Going directly to ...\Lib\idlelib\idle.pyw produces the spinning icon.
At least, that's what happens in 3.2.2, but in the 32-bit versions I
tried, I would get "invalid Win 32 app".

When I rebooted my system a few hours after installing 3.2.2, because
the PC was running really slowly--not because of Python, I was greeted
by a couple of interesting messages as the desktop was populated.

I can execute Python from the command line.

1. Specified module could not be found: Load Lib, python.dll.

2. \ProgramFiles(x86)\uniblueDrivers\Scanner (x86) Python26.dll. I'm
sure this is related to Winamp, which I had installed a month ago. It
had some "crazy" choice to scan for new drivers. Of course, if it
found one-connected with Python, and if you wanted it, $$$. I think
this message is a red herring. I may re-install Winamp to get rid of
that uniblue tool that seems like nothing more than an ad.

Some have suggested a registry problem, but I don't have a clue how to
play with that, or somehow clean it up, if there is a problem. My PC
behaves normally

I'm using Win 7 Premium.

So unless some brilliant idea appears, that leaves me with the choice of
not using Python or this suggestion... (Let's not get off into other
variations of other "Pythons" like Active..."):

Someone suggested using the mail list at
<http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list>. What's different
about that list than this NG? Does the "org" suggest that the
inhabitants of that list are more likely associated with the people who
are responsible for constructing Python?

Comments?
 
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A

Andrea Crotti

...
I'm using Win 7 Premium.

So unless some brilliant idea appears, that leaves me with the choice
of not using Python or this suggestion... (Let's not get off into
other variations of other "Pythons" like Active..."):

Someone suggested using the mail list at
<http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list>. What's
different about that list than this NG? Does the "org" suggest that
the inhabitants of that list are more likely associated with the
people who are responsible for constructing Python?

Comments?

I only see windows and users-related problems, not much having to do
with Python actually.
Moreover, nothing forces you to use it, and with this attitude is not
bad that you stay way
from it, no offense of course.
 
C

Cousin Stanley

W. eWatson said:
My criterion for success is that it puts IDLE as a choice for editor
on the menu produced with a right-click on a py file.

So far no response on this has solved the problem.
....

As an alternative you might consider adding a short-cut to IDLE
to the Send To directory if that option is still available
under windows 7 ....

That would seem almost as handy
only moving the mouse one more time
to roll out the Send To target menu
before the final click to launch ....
 
D

Dennis Lee Bieber

My criterion for success is that it puts IDLE as a choice for editor on
the menu produced with a right-click on a py file. So far no response on
this has solved the problem.

I know it sets up that way on a 2.5 and 2.4 on other PCs I have.
I have three computers here:

-=-=-=-=-=- Desktop
WinXP Pro 32-bit, 3.4GHz hyper-threaded P4
ActiveState ActivePython 2.5.2.2 (Python 2.5.2)

Right click menu has "open" (run with python.exe if .py, run with
pythonw.exe if .pyw), and "edit" (opens PythonWin)

NO IDLE option on right click. No IDLE option in
"start/programs/activestate activepython 2.5"

-=-=-=-=-=- Old laptop
WinXP Home 32-bit, 2.66GHz P4
ActiveState ActivePython 2.5.5.7 (Python 2.5.5)

Right click menu has "open" (as above) and "edit with PythonWin".

NO IDLE option on right click. Did not check "start/programs/..."

-=-=-=-=-=- New laptop
Win7 Home Premium 64-bit, 2.2GHz i7-2720QM (quad core hyperthreaded)
ActiveState ActivePython 2.7.1.4 for 64-bit (Python 2.7.1)

NO IDLE option on right click. IDLE shortcut found as "start/all
programs/activepython (64-bit)/idle", and it runs properly (it did take
some 15-20 seconds though to bring up the IDLE Tk window). The shortcut
properties are:
Target: c:\python27_64\lib\idlelib\idle.bat
Start in: c:\python27_64
(Note that it is a .bat file that is referenced, and such is a "native"
windows executable file)

ALSO have
ActiveState Active Python 2.7.1.4 for 32-bit

IDLE shortcut found at "start/all programs/activepython/idle".
Properties are similar to above except instead of "python27_64" they
have "python27" only

-=-=-=-=-=-

So, out of two generations of 32-bit Python 2.5, and 64 and 32 bit
versions of Python 2.7, on three computers, NONE of mine have a
right-click option for IDLE.
I do know that IDLE appears on the Win 7 Start menu, but, when used,
nothing happens. Well, OK, for about 3 seconds the Win 7 "working" icon
spins around then zip, nothing. Further, right-clicking on Properties
of IDLE (GUI) produces a tabbed dialog. It shows Start in:
c:\Python32\, and None for shortcut. There is a compatibility tab,

But what does it show for TARGET!
Going directly to ...\Lib\idlelib\idle.pyw produces the spinning icon.
At least, that's what happens in 3.2.2, but in the 32-bit versions I
tried, I would get "invalid Win 32 app".
Possibly because you are trying to start a 32-bit version with a
default "open" for .pyw files that runs the 64-bit Python.exe; so the
DLLs are mixed architecture.

Some have suggested a registry problem, but I don't have a clue how to
play with that, or somehow clean it up, if there is a problem. My PC
behaves normally
Since none of your problems appear to be related to Python itself,
but rather to the Windows configuration of the Python system, I'd have
to disagree.
I'm using Win 7 Premium.

Home, Pro, Ultimate (or whatever the top level is?
 
T

Terry Reedy

My criterion for success is that it puts IDLE as a choice for editor on
the menu produced with a right-click on a py file.

Your first criterion for success should be that IDLE runs at all, which
is apparently does not. How you run it is secondary.

Right-click responses are controlled by Windows using data in the
registry. Windows modifies the registry in response to installers *and
users*. The ActiveState installers request 'Edit with PythonWin'. They
do not request 'Edit with IDLE' and it is foolish to complain to us when
you use ActiveState and get their choice of context choices.

The PSF .msi installers (.msi = MicroSoftInstall format) from python.org
request 'Edit with IDLE' but cannot make Windows put it in. If your
registry is messed up enough, it does not happen. But no error message.

I have explained to you another way to work with IDLE once it runs. It
you refuse to use it, that is your problem, not ours.
I know it sets up that way on a 2.5 and 2.4 on other PCs I have.

You installed with the PSF installer with an ok registry.
I know at one time it worked on my 64-bit Win 7 PC, which likely had a
32-bit version installed on it. After something like six months of
modest use it stopped working as above. No IDLE choice.

So some *other* program messed things up. Stop blaming us.
Heavy or modest use in the meantime is irrelevant.
I know by installing a 64-bit version, 3.2.2 failed the IDLE criterions
as described. No IDLE.

Did you uninstall the 32 bit version, and best, all Python versions?
I do know that IDLE appears on the Win 7 Start menu, but, when used,
nothing happens. Well, OK, for about 3 seconds the Win 7 "working" icon
spins around then zip, nothing.

This is your real problem. Stop worrying about the context menu.
Further, right-clicking on Properties of
IDLE (GUI) produces a tabbed dialog. It shows Start in: c:\Python32\,

This is the Shortcut tab. A shortcut is like a bound method. The
function is the target: 'python 3.2.2 (64 bit)' on my machine. The
starting directory is like a bound argument, although it is passed to
the launcher that launches the function. What the Properties dialog does
not show are the actual 'bound arguments' that are passed to the target
as options. So one cannot know what the shortcut is actually trying to
do. This is one of the Really Stupid things about Windows that should
have been fixed long ago but has not.
and None for shortcut.

None for Shortcut key, such as alt-I to invoke the shortcut.
There is a compatibility tab, which I've set to
Win7. I think there's a troubleshooter there too, but I haven't used it.
Under the Details tab, it shows Name: IDLE(Python Gui).lnk. Folder Path
as: c:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Start... Nothing after the "...".

Details: Folder Path is the same as General: Location. Mouse over the
latter the the full path appears. That Properties windows are still
fixed at 480 pixel wide, regardless of screen size, is another Really
Stupid thing.
Going directly to ...\Lib\idlelib\idle.pyw produces the spinning icon.
At least, that's what happens in 3.2.2, but in the 32-bit versions I
tried, I would get "invalid Win 32 app".

If the registry entry for .pyw is messed up, trying to run the file by
clicking on it is not likely to work. Try running from Command Prompt,
as I believe others suggested.
When I rebooted my system a few hours after installing 3.2.2, because
the PC was running really slowly--not because of Python, I was greeted
by a couple of interesting messages as the desktop was populated.

I can execute Python from the command line.

1. Specified module could not be found: Load Lib, python.dll.

2. \ProgramFiles(x86)\uniblueDrivers\Scanner (x86) Python26.dll.

The uniblue drivers program will match your drivers against a database
of up-to-date drivers and offer to upgrade them. I have used uniblue's
registry scanner program. Treating pythonxy.dll as a driver, if they
are, is an error. These are paid programs. The free demos only scan to
tell you what they would do if you bought them.
I'm sure this is related to Winamp, which I had installed a month ago.

I do not believe they are the same companies, but they may have a
cross-promotion deal.
had some "crazy" choice to scan for new drivers. Of course, if it found
one-connected with Python, and if you wanted it, $$$. I think this
message is a red herring. I may re-install Winamp to get rid of that
uniblue tool that seems like nothing more than an ad.

Some have suggested a registry problem, but I don't have a clue how to
play with that, or somehow clean it up, if there is a problem. My PC
behaves normally

If you ran the psf 3.2.2 installer and idle does not run when you click
the start menu shortcut, something is wrong.
Someone suggested using the mail list at
<http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list>. What's different
about that list than this NG? Does the "org" suggest that the
inhabitants of that list are more likely associated with the people who
are responsible for constructing Python?

Python list is mirror to comp.lang.python which is mirrored to a google
group. It is also mirrored to gmane.comp.python, which is how I read and
post. There is some spam filtering if you use the python.org list or
gmane group.
 
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W

W. eWatson

I have three computers here:

-=-=-=-=-=- Desktop
WinXP Pro 32-bit, 3.4GHz hyper-threaded P4
ActiveState ActivePython 2.5.2.2 (Python 2.5.2)

All of the above use ActiveState. I use whatever the Python organization
provides on their download site. I would not expect the two to compare.
-=-=-=-=-=-

So, out of two generations of 32-bit Python 2.5, and 64 and 32 bit
versions of Python 2.7, on three computers, NONE of mine have a
right-click option for IDLE.


But what does it show for TARGET!

c:\Python32 Start in, and for Target: Python 3.2.2 (64-bit)
For the shortcut C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Start
Menu\Programs\Python3.2
 
W

W. eWatson

Your first criterion for success should be that IDLE runs at all, which
is apparently does not. How you run it is secondary.

Right-click responses are controlled by Windows using data in the
registry. Windows modifies the registry in response to installers *and
users*. The ActiveState installers request 'Edit with PythonWin'. They
do not request 'Edit with IDLE' and it is foolish to complain to us when
you use ActiveState and get their choice of context choices.

ActiveState. Am I missing something? I'm running 64-bit Python
downloaded from the Python organization's web site.l
The PSF .msi installers (.msi = MicroSoftInstall format) from python.org
request 'Edit with IDLE' but cannot make Windows put it in. If your
registry is messed up enough, it does not happen. But no error message.

I have explained to you another way to work with IDLE once it runs. It
you refuse to use it, that is your problem, not ours.


You installed with the PSF installer with an ok registry.

PSF? What does "ok registry" mean?
So some *other* program messed things up. Stop blaming us.
Heavy or modest use in the meantime is irrelevant.
I'm blaming you??? I was just providing data for whatever it might be
worth. I'm also suggesting that I do not have years of experience with
Python.
Did you uninstall the 32 bit version, and best, all Python versions?


This is your real problem. Stop worrying about the context menu.

I would expect consistency through all Python org releases. Should I put
consistency in really bold letters with a 30 point font? :)
This is the Shortcut tab. A shortcut is like a bound method. The
function is the target: 'python 3.2.2 (64 bit)' on my machine. The
starting directory is like a bound argument, although it is passed to
the launcher that launches the function. What the Properties dialog does
not show are the actual 'bound arguments' that are passed to the target
as options. So one cannot know what the shortcut is actually trying to
do. This is one of the Really Stupid things about Windows that should
have been fixed long ago but has not.

I never use the shortcut on the Start menu. I mentioned the Start menu,
since it might have some relevance.
None for Shortcut key, such as alt-I to invoke the shortcut.


Details: Folder Path is the same as General: Location. Mouse over the
latter the the full path appears. That Properties windows are still
fixed at 480 pixel wide, regardless of screen size, is another Really
Stupid thing.

Yes, I finally realized I could mouse over it.
If the registry entry for .pyw is messed up, trying to run the file by
clicking on it is not likely to work. Try running from Command Prompt,
as I believe others suggested.

I'm not trying to run the program, I'm trying to edit. Several times in
these threads I've mentioned I can execute python from the command line.
The uniblue drivers program will match your drivers against a database
of up-to-date drivers and offer to upgrade them. I have used uniblue's
registry scanner program. Treating pythonxy.dll as a driver, if they
are, is an error. These are paid programs. The free demos only scan to
tell you what they would do if you bought them.

Yes. Just Winamp looking for $$$.
I do not believe they are the same companies, but they may have a
cross-promotion deal. Evidently.

If you ran the psf 3.2.2 installer and idle does not run when you click
the start menu shortcut, something is wrong.
Of course. Assuming psf means something like python software foundation.
Python list is mirror to comp.lang.python which is mirrored to a google
group. It is also mirrored to gmane.comp.python, which is how I read and
post. There is some spam filtering if you use the python.org list or
gmane group.
Good. Then I don't need it.
 
D

Dennis Lee Bieber

All of the above use ActiveState. I use whatever the Python organization
provides on their download site. I would not expect the two to compare.
Which is mostly a repackaged version of the Python.org download,
usually with a few added libraries (the Win32 extensions, for windows,
along with the PythonWin editor).
c:\Python32 Start in, and for Target: Python 3.2.2 (64-bit)

Which tells me that the TARGET field is garbaged, since THAT is what
specifies the program (and arguments) that has to be run when the
shortcut is double-clicked.

Try editing the target field to read (presuming the 3.x branch of
Python keeps the same library structure):

c:\python32\lib\idlelib\idle.bat

save the change, and then select the short-cut to see if it runs.
 
A

Alan Meyer

My criterion for success is that it puts IDLE as a choice for editor on
the menu produced with a right-click on a py file. So far no response on
this has solved the problem. ...

I don't know what responses you're referring to since this is the first
posting in the thread. It's possible what I'm about to say was already
told to you - in which case I'm wasting my and everyone's time.

However, leaving that aside, I think that this is trivially easy to
solve. It has nothing whatever to do with Python or Idle - though it's
possible that the Python installer could have done something for that it
didn't - and it's also possible that the Python installer did what you
told it to do but you told it the wrong thing, or you told Windows to
change it without realizing that you did. (I do that all the time. A
mouse slip and inadvertent click on the wrong object, a misunderstanding
of a prompt, or lots of other missteps can change things without your
having any idea what happened.)

Anyway, if I understand what you're looking for, here's what you need to
do to fix your problem:

1. Open Windows Explorer.

2. Navigate to a Python file.

3. Right click on the Python file with the mouse.

4. Select "Open With"

5. Select "Choose Default Program"

6. Select, or navigate to and select, the python IDLE interpreter.

7. Check the box that says "Always use the selected program to open this
kind of file."

8. Click "OK".

The prompts I described above are the ones I saw on my Windows Server
2008 machine. Yours may vary slightly, but I think the procedures
should be the same.

Please let us know if that solves your problem.

Alan
 
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A

Andrea Crotti

Your joking, right, or do you just prefer 500 line threads wandering
all over the place?

I would personally prefer to just not see useless discussions about
Windows set up in a python mailing list,
but I guess it's a price to pay for the popularity of Python..
 
A

Alan Meyer

On 11/22/2011 1:55 PM, Alan Meyer wrote:
....
6. Select, or navigate to and select, the python IDLE interpreter.
....
On my system that's
C:\Python26\Lib\site-packages\pythonwin\Pythonwin.exe

Alan
 
D

Dennis Lee Bieber

On 11/22/2011 1:55 PM, Alan Meyer wrote:
...
...
On my system that's
C:\Python26\Lib\site-packages\pythonwin\Pythonwin.exe
Note that this is not the Tk based IDLE (which is implemented,
itself, as a .pyw file and is not natively executable -- which seems to
be one of the problems; Win7 has removed the detailed file type
association windows so you can't specify that the "application" is
pythonw.exe running idle.pyw using one's selected file as the argument
to the mess).
 
T

Terry Reedy

Which tells me that the TARGET field is garbaged,

The above is exactly what my IDLE shortcut target field says, and it
works fine.
since THAT is what specifies the program (and arguments)
that has to be run when the shortcut is double-clicked.

It would be nice if it DID show all that info.
Try editing the target field to read (presuming the 3.x branch of
Python keeps the same library structure):

c:\python32\lib\idlelib\idle.bat

save the change, and then select the short-cut to see if it runs.

Target for the .msi created shortcut cannot be edited, even as admin.
 
W

W. eWatson

On 11/22/2011 1:55 PM, Alan Meyer wrote:
...
...
On my system that's
C:\Python26\Lib\site-packages\pythonwin\Pythonwin.exe

Alan
OK, I'm going to try it soon. Keeping my fingers crossed.
 
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A

Alan Meyer

Note that this is not the Tk based IDLE (which is implemented,
itself, as a .pyw file and is not natively executable -- which seems to
be one of the problems; Win7 has removed the detailed file type
association windows so you can't specify that the "application" is
pythonw.exe running idle.pyw using one's selected file as the argument
to the mess).

Bummer!

Sorry W.eWatson, my instructions may not work. I've got the ActiveState
Python on my Windows machine. It runs a .exe file as the IDLE
executable. If your implementation doesn't have an exe then you're
going to have to do some more complex work.

Since I don't have the version of Python from python.org under Windows,
I can't really advise on what to do with that. If you haven't got an
exe, my instructions will only work if you install the ActiveState
version, which does have one.

Alan
 
W

W. eWatson

OK, I'm going to try it soon. Keeping my fingers crossed.

Well, all there was there was a README.txt file that told me the purpose
of the folder.
"This directory exists so that 3rd party packages can be installed
here. Read the source for site.py for more details."

Of course, Dennis'
C:\Python26\Lib\site-packages\pythonwin\Pythonwin.exe
wouldn't work either.

I did a Win 7 search Pythonwin.exe, and found nothing. However,
sometimes that search fails even when though there is something on the
PC that matches the search.

There is a pythonw.exe under C:\Python32.
 
D

Dennis Lee Bieber

Of course, Dennis'
C:\Python26\Lib\site-packages\pythonwin\Pythonwin.exe
wouldn't work either.
If you didn't install an ActiveState packaged version, nor hand
installed the win32 extension package into a Python.org installed
system, you won't have PythonWin.
I did a Win 7 search Pythonwin.exe, and found nothing. However,
sometimes that search fails even when though there is something on the
PC that matches the search.

There is a pythonw.exe under C:\Python32.

And has been mentioned at least three times in the last week --
pythonw.exe is the version of the Python interpreter that is supposed to
be the default application for .pyw files. It is the version that does
NOT open a console window for stdin/stdout (IOWs, it is meant for use by
Python scripts that use a graphical library for all I/O -- Tk, wxPython,
etc.). If you ran a graphical script using the plain python.exe it would
open a console window that would just sit there until the script exited.
 
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A

Alemu Tadesse

I just subscribed for python and I am VERY NEW. I would like to have a
an IDLE. My texts are just the same whether it is comment or def or
statement or ...... how am I going to make it highlighted ..my
scientific package is not working and complaining about not able to
find/load DLL ... frustrating for the first day in the python world. ANY
tip ?

Thanks

Alemu

-----Original Message-----
From: [email protected]
[mailto:p[email protected]] On Behalf
Of Dennis Lee Bieber
Sent: Tuesday, November 22, 2011 11:43 PM
To: (e-mail address removed)
Subject: Re: What I do and do not know about installing Python on Win 7
withregard to IDLE.

Of course, Dennis'
C:\Python26\Lib\site-packages\pythonwin\Pythonwin.exe
wouldn't work either.
If you didn't install an ActiveState packaged version, nor hand
installed the win32 extension package into a Python.org installed
system, you won't have PythonWin.
I did a Win 7 search Pythonwin.exe, and found nothing. However,
sometimes that search fails even when though there is something on the
PC that matches the search.

There is a pythonw.exe under C:\Python32.

And has been mentioned at least three times in the last week --
pythonw.exe is the version of the Python interpreter that is supposed to
be the default application for .pyw files. It is the version that does
NOT open a console window for stdin/stdout (IOWs, it is meant for use by
Python scripts that use a graphical library for all I/O -- Tk, wxPython,
etc.). If you ran a graphical script using the plain python.exe it would
open a console window that would just sit there until the script exited.
 

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