what's the trick for a scrollbar these days?


R

richard

Used to be fairly simple. If you wanted scrollbars as needed, just add
overflow:auto to the css.
Now when I do that, all I get is the vertical scrollbar.
Even with overflow:scroll, I get the vertical, and the horizontal shows the
place holder thing, but no scrollbar.
I've tried some tricks in trying to get the horizontal scroll but doesn't
seem to work for me. While it works just fine when using scripts from
outside sources. I just can't figure it out.
 
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D

Denis McMahon

Used to be fairly simple. If you wanted scrollbars as needed, just add
overflow:auto to the css.
Now when I do that, all I get is the vertical scrollbar.
Even with overflow:scroll, I get the vertical, and the horizontal shows the
place holder thing, but no scrollbar.
I've tried some tricks in trying to get the horizontal scroll but doesn't
seem to work for me. While it works just fine when using scripts from
outside sources. I just can't figure it out.

Let me check, you want to force horizontal scrolling?

Rgds

Denis McMahon
 
R

richard

Let me check, you want to force horizontal scrolling?

Rgds

Denis McMahon

Precisely. Yes I know the consensus is, among those certain few, that
horizontal scrollbares are the nastiest plague, but there are times when it
becomes necessary.

In my particular case, I need it to keep the data in the place where I
intend it to be. Not break apart and make it look it sloppy.
 
R

richard

Used to be fairly simple. If you wanted scrollbars as needed, just add
overflow:auto to the css.
Now when I do that, all I get is the vertical scrollbar.
Even with overflow:scroll, I get the vertical, and the horizontal shows the
place holder thing, but no scrollbar.
I've tried some tricks in trying to get the horizontal scroll but doesn't
seem to work for me. While it works just fine when using scripts from
outside sources. I just can't figure it out.

I managed to figure it out and for my needs, it works just fine.
 
R

richard

Google will tell you how to do it. Fairly simple.


There's a shocker.


Read the source code. Figure out the difference between what you are
doing and what they are doing.


That's your motto in life huh?

I just love the words of wisdom from such an expert, who can't even get his
own web site to function properly.
 
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D

dorayme

richard said:
Used to be fairly simple. If you wanted scrollbars as needed, just add
overflow:auto to the css.
Now when I do that, all I get is the vertical scrollbar.
Even with overflow:scroll, I get the vertical, and the horizontal shows the
place holder thing, but no scrollbar.
I've tried some tricks in trying to get the horizontal scroll but doesn't
seem to work for me. While it works just fine when using scripts from
outside sources. I just can't figure it out.

<div style="width: 450px; overflow: auto; background: #cfc;"><img
style="margin: auto; display: block;" src="pic.png" width="900"
height="900" alt=""></div>

Gets you scrollbars on the div when needed. But to see the bottom
ones, you have to scroll the browser normally to get to the
bottom of the picture (and not, as on the planet I came from,
floating above your computer <g>).
 
R

richard

<div style="width: 450px; overflow: auto; background: #cfc;"><img
style="margin: auto; display: block;" src="pic.png" width="900"
height="900" alt=""></div>

Gets you scrollbars on the div when needed. But to see the bottom
ones, you have to scroll the browser normally to get to the
bottom of the picture (and not, as on the planet I came from,
floating above your computer <g>).

Actually, the trick is in having a second division, or element, embedded
within where you want the scroll to appear.

<div id="outer" style="width:100px; height:100px; overflow-x:auto;
overflow-y:hidden;">
<div id="inner" style="width:500px;">
This are a test
</div></div>

Now the horizontal scrollbar appears as it should. At least it works for me
just fine this way.

Now if I could just figure out how to make myself float above your.......uh
well, my location, then that would be a real trick.
 
D

Denis McMahon

Precisely. Yes I know the consensus is, among those certain few, that
horizontal scrollbares are the nastiest plague, but there are times when it
becomes necessary.

In my particular case, I need it to keep the data in the place where I
intend it to be. Not break apart and make it look it sloppy.

Then you're trying to cram too much data onto a page.

Find a better way to visually present your data.

Rgds

Denis McMahon
 
D

dorayme

....
Actually, the trick is in having a second division, or element, embedded
within where you want the scroll to appear.

<div id="outer" style="width:100px; height:100px; overflow-x:auto;
overflow-y:hidden;">
<div id="inner" style="width:500px;">
This are a test
</div></div>

Now the horizontal scrollbar appears as it should. At least it works for me
just fine this way.

Well, if you just have my above with some of your values:

<div style="width: 100px; height:100px; overflow: auto;
background: #cfc;"><p style="width:500px;">This is a
test</p></div>

seems to be simpler. But, don't know what you are doing and I
would never ever ask a truck driver or an ex truck driver for a
URL. Last time I did that, he pulled an iron bar out from under
his seat... <g>
 
R

richard

Or let the user download an Excel or whatever file and view it in the
native application.

You can't have any idea of your user's screent size. Stop wanting that.

Besides, if you design a page propoerly, my standards-compliant browser
will give me a scroll bar to view it.

Are you trying to invent a square wheel?

Exactly. Just like the whiners who cry about using tables for display
purposes.
So what happens when a user visits your site designed for modern browsers
and screen resolutitons with a window size of 800x600 and your site is
2000x3000?
Oh we're sorry, you can't see that other part because whiners insist on no
horizontal scroll.
 
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A

Adrienne Boswell

Exactly. Just like the whiners who cry about using tables for display
purposes.
So what happens when a user visits your site designed for modern
browsers and screen resolutitons with a window size of 800x600 and
your site is 2000x3000?
Oh we're sorry, you can't see that other part because whiners insist
on no horizontal scroll.

No, a website should shrink/expand to fit. Say you go to a supermarket
where there is only one flavor of jelly, and you ask the manager if they
are going to get any more, and he says "No, this store will only sell
that flavor because that is the one I like.". Would you go back to that
store, or would you go across the street to another store and get another
kind of jelly?
 
R

richard

No, a website should shrink/expand to fit. Say you go to a supermarket
where there is only one flavor of jelly, and you ask the manager if they
are going to get any more, and he says "No, this store will only sell
that flavor because that is the one I like.". Would you go back to that
store, or would you go across the street to another store and get another
kind of jelly?

Yeah right.
Nobody should need to write code that fits each and every possible
condition. Is it "*MY*" fault your web browser can't handle the code?
I'm sure as hell not gonna write code to fit that iphone screen.
The code was written for possible scenarios that could arise in the course
of designing. If horizontal scrollbars were not included, then we'd all be
forced to live without them.
 
D

Denis McMahon

So what happens when a user visits your site designed for modern browsers
and screen resolutitons with a window size of 800x600 and your site is
2000x3000?
Oh we're sorry, you can't see that other part because whiners insist on no
horizontal scroll.

Simple - Don't try and define the size of the users browser, and instead
try and sensibly accommodate any browser width.

Users will not want to scroll in two dimensions to view your web page.

If your web page needs a width of 2k pixels to display, you're trying to
put too much on it. Break your data down into smaller chunks.

Rgds

Denis McMahon
 
D

Denis McMahon

Yeah right.

Yes, right.
Nobody should need to write code that fits each and every possible
condition. Is it "*MY*" fault your web browser can't handle the code?

Actually, if you're writing the code, then yes it is.
I'm sure as hell not gonna write code to fit that iphone screen.
The code was written for possible scenarios that could arise in the course
of designing. If horizontal scrollbars were not included, then we'd all be
forced to live without them.

Just because they're there doesn't mean that you have to use them. Like
<blink>blinking text</blink>.

I've tried to ignore the richard knocking in here and other places, but
I'm rapidly coming to the conclusion that most of it is well founded.

I don't know why you bother asking for help and advice on writing html
because you invariably want to do something that historically others
have learned is not good practice, your response is invariably to attack
anyone who suggests that what you want to do might not be the best way
to do it, and you absolutely refuse to contemplate that the advice that
you explore different ways of doing things might be well founded and
intentioned.

You're just wasting your time and ours, and the world would be a better
place if you just deleted your usenet client.

Rgds

Denis McMahon
 
J

Jonathan N. Little

richard said:
Nobody should need to write code that fits each and every possible
condition. Is it "*MY*" fault your web browser can't handle the code?

You complain that you have a problem with html and that you do not know
the answer.

Knowledgeable answers are offered.

You then rail that all answers are wrong.

It is obvious that html is beyond your comprehension. You do not really
seek understanding, more likely only attention. It is tedious, please go
away.
 
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L

Lewis

Yeah right.
Nobody should need to write code that fits each and every possible
condition. Is it "*MY*" fault your web browser can't handle the code?
I'm sure as hell not gonna write code to fit that iphone screen.

Write proper code and you needn't worry about the size of the screen.
 
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R

richard

Simple - Don't try and define the size of the users browser, and instead
try and sensibly accommodate any browser width.

Users will not want to scroll in two dimensions to view your web page.

If your web page needs a width of 2k pixels to display, you're trying to
put too much on it. Break your data down into smaller chunks.

Rgds

Denis McMahon

My need is only to scroll only certain items that would not otherwise fit
within the defined borders. Which will probably happen less than a tenth of
the time. Then, that isn't all that much.
 

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