Daylight saving in NSW

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Adrienne Boswell, Mar 30, 2008.

  1. Gazing into my crystal ball I observed dorayme
    <> writing in news:doraymeRidThis-
    :

    > In NSW Australia, daylight saving does not finish until 6th April (a
    > week later than usual). I noticed my computer clock was put back an

    hour
    > today. It is supposed to be done automatically on a per region basis
    > (set in sys pref on a Mac). Something or someone has stuffed up. Had

    to
    > manually put it forward again. It is possible, I suppose, it is just

    my
    > machine at fault (not me, of course.)
    >


    I hate daylight saving time. It's a waste of time. The sun isn't going
    to do anything different just because we want it to, and Bessy the cow
    isn't going to give milk any sooner, just because Old McDonald's buyers
    are the the farm an hour earlier. Traffic accidents spike at the
    beginning of DST, because our internal clocks don't give a hoot what the
    clock says either - we're losing an hour of sleep.

    I say it's time to get rid of DST altogether.

    --
    Adrienne Boswell at Home
    Arbpen Web Site Design Services
    http://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
    Please respond to the group so others can share
    Adrienne Boswell, Mar 30, 2008
    #1
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  2. Adrienne Boswell

    Eric Lindsay Guest

    In article
    <>,
    dorayme <> wrote:

    > In NSW Australia, daylight saving does not finish until 6th April (a
    > week later than usual). I noticed my computer clock was put back an hour
    > today. It is supposed to be done automatically on a per region basis
    > (set in sys pref on a Mac). Something or someone has stuffed up. Had to
    > manually put it forward again. It is possible, I suppose, it is just my
    > machine at fault (not me, of course.)


    I gather NSW legislation only went through in late October. I can't see
    any indication at Apple support of a Daylight Saving update for Leopard
    (nor for Tiger or Panther past March 2007).

    At least some mobile phones also didn't notice the problem, as reported
    in the news this morning.

    I am very glad I live in a state that does not use Daylight Saving. Less
    complicated.

    --
    http://www.ericlindsay.com
    Eric Lindsay, Mar 30, 2008
    #2
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  3. Adrienne Boswell

    David Empson Guest

    dorayme <> wrote:

    > In NSW Australia, daylight saving does not finish until 6th April (a
    > week later than usual). I noticed my computer clock was put back an hour
    > today. It is supposed to be done automatically on a per region basis
    > (set in sys pref on a Mac). Something or someone has stuffed up. Had to
    > manually put it forward again. It is possible, I suppose, it is just my
    > machine at fault (not me, of course.)


    Which version of Mac OS X are you running?

    According to my 10.5.2 system, the current time zone in Sydney is
    UTC+11, which agrees with your description of what the time should be.

    If you are running 10.4.10 or earlier, and the rule changed from last
    year, then your version of Mac OS X has out of date daylight saving
    rules.

    Apple released updated rules in 10.4.11 and 10.5.

    We had a similar problem in New Zealand back in September, when the
    rules changed here, and we have a problem right now for anyone still
    running 10.4.10 or earlier, as the end of daylight saving moved ahead by
    three weeks (to April 6th).

    Since 10.4.11 and 10.5 weren't out in time for our local daylight saving
    transition in September, a friend of mine wrote a patch for the daylight
    saving rules for New Zealand to fix the problem for people running
    10.3.9 and 10.4.9/10.

    The whole story is here:

    http://welmac.org.nz/nzdst2007.php

    --
    David Empson
    David Empson, Mar 30, 2008
    #3
  4. Adrienne Boswell

    dorayme Guest

    In NSW Australia, daylight saving does not finish until 6th April (a
    week later than usual). I noticed my computer clock was put back an hour
    today. It is supposed to be done automatically on a per region basis
    (set in sys pref on a Mac). Something or someone has stuffed up. Had to
    manually put it forward again. It is possible, I suppose, it is just my
    machine at fault (not me, of course.)

    --
    dorayme
    dorayme, Mar 30, 2008
    #4
  5. Adrienne Boswell

    Ed Mullen Guest

    Neredbojias wrote:
    > On 29 Mar 2008, Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:
    >
    >>> In NSW Australia, daylight saving does not finish until 6th April (a
    >>> week later than usual). I noticed my computer clock was put back an

    >> hour
    >>> today.

    >> I hate daylight saving time. It's a waste of time. The sun isn't going
    >> to do anything different just because we want it to, and Bessy the cow
    >> isn't going to give milk any sooner, just because Old McDonald's buyers
    >> are the the farm an hour earlier. Traffic accidents spike at the
    >> beginning of DST, because our internal clocks don't give a hoot what the
    >> clock says either - we're losing an hour of sleep.
    >>
    >> I say it's time to get rid of DST altogether.

    >
    > I couldn't agree more. Fortunately, I, like Eric, live in a state which
    > has no daylight savings time, but before I moved, I hated it, too. I think
    > the point is that if they want to adjust work and school start times, etc.,
    > go ahead, but leave the clock itself alone.
    >


    I kinda like it staying light later. It was especially fun for me when
    I spent 2 1/2 weeks in Ireland in June and it stayed light until almost
    10 PM. Same thing on an Alaska cruise. I think we should just adjust
    the clock ahead an hour for 12 months of the year! :-D

    --
    Ed Mullen
    http://edmullen.net
    UnHallmark Card: I must admit, you brought Religion into my life. I
    never believed in Hell until I met you.
    Ed Mullen, Mar 30, 2008
    #5
  6. Adrienne Boswell

    Neredbojias Guest

    On 29 Mar 2008, Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:

    >> In NSW Australia, daylight saving does not finish until 6th April (a
    >> week later than usual). I noticed my computer clock was put back an

    > hour
    >> today.

    >
    > I hate daylight saving time. It's a waste of time. The sun isn't going
    > to do anything different just because we want it to, and Bessy the cow
    > isn't going to give milk any sooner, just because Old McDonald's buyers
    > are the the farm an hour earlier. Traffic accidents spike at the
    > beginning of DST, because our internal clocks don't give a hoot what the
    > clock says either - we're losing an hour of sleep.
    >
    > I say it's time to get rid of DST altogether.


    I couldn't agree more. Fortunately, I, like Eric, live in a state which
    has no daylight savings time, but before I moved, I hated it, too. I think
    the point is that if they want to adjust work and school start times, etc.,
    go ahead, but leave the clock itself alone.

    --
    Neredbojias
    http://www.neredbojias.com/
    Great sights and sounds
    Neredbojias, Mar 30, 2008
    #6
  7. Adrienne Boswell wrote:
    > Gazing into my crystal ball I observed dorayme
    > <> writing in news:doraymeRidThis-
    > :
    >
    >> In NSW Australia, daylight saving does not finish until 6th April (a
    >> week later than usual). I noticed my computer clock was put back an

    > hour
    >> today. It is supposed to be done automatically on a per region basis
    >> (set in sys pref on a Mac). Something or someone has stuffed up. Had

    > to
    >> manually put it forward again. It is possible, I suppose, it is just

    > my
    >> machine at fault (not me, of course.)
    >>

    >
    > I hate daylight saving time. It's a waste of time. The sun isn't going
    > to do anything different just because we want it to, and Bessy the cow
    > isn't going to give milk any sooner, just because Old McDonald's buyers
    > are the the farm an hour earlier. Traffic accidents spike at the
    > beginning of DST, because our internal clocks don't give a hoot what the
    > clock says either - we're losing an hour of sleep.
    >
    > I say it's time to get rid of DST altogether.
    >

    Couldn't agree more. If you want to trade with an adjoining time zone,
    get up an hour earlier [1]. You don't have to bother the cows and the
    school children at all, let the rest of us stay in tune with the sun.
    It's crazy that we're totally controlled by little mechanical devices
    strapped to our wrists.

    [1] I live in a half hour time zone, like Newfoundland!

    --
    Phil Kempster
    http://kempster.info
    Phil Kempster, Mar 30, 2008
    #7
  8. Adrienne Boswell

    Neredbojias Guest

    On 29 Mar 2008, Ed Mullen <> wrote:

    >>> I say it's time to get rid of DST altogether.

    >>
    >> I couldn't agree more. Fortunately, I, like Eric, live in a state
    >> which has no daylight savings time, but before I moved, I hated it,
    >> too. I think the point is that if they want to adjust work and
    >> school start times, etc., go ahead, but leave the clock itself alone.
    >>

    >
    > I kinda like it staying light later. It was especially fun for me
    > when I spent 2 1/2 weeks in Ireland in June and it stayed light until
    > almost 10 PM. Same thing on an Alaska cruise. I think we should just
    > adjust the clock ahead an hour for 12 months of the year! :-D


    That's okay by me. My objection is to _changing_ the clock during the year
    (twice!) not to what time you want the sun to rise or set.

    --
    Neredbojias
    http://www.neredbojias.com/
    Great sights and sounds
    Neredbojias, Mar 30, 2008
    #8
  9. Neredbojias <> wrote:

    > On 29 Mar 2008, Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:
    >
    > > I hate daylight saving time. It's a waste of time. The sun isn't going
    > > to do anything different just because we want it to, and Bessy the cow
    > > isn't going to give milk any sooner, just because Old McDonald's buyers
    > > are the the farm an hour earlier. Traffic accidents spike at the
    > > beginning of DST, because our internal clocks don't give a hoot what the
    > > clock says either - we're losing an hour of sleep.
    > >
    > > I say it's time to get rid of DST altogether.

    >
    > I couldn't agree more. Fortunately, I, like Eric, live in a state which
    > has no daylight savings time, but before I moved, I hated it, too. I think
    > the point is that if they want to adjust work and school start times, etc.,
    > go ahead, but leave the clock itself alone.


    Funny. Do you really think that leaving the clock alone, but changing
    the starting time of everything you do makes any difference whatsoever?
    It still means you have to get up one hour earlier.

    I like DST. We have one more hour of daylight in the evening, so it
    really makes me feel that summer is on its way.


    --
    Johan W. Elzenga johan<<at>>johanfoto.nl
    Editor / Photographer http://www.johanfoto.com
    Johan W. Elzenga, Mar 30, 2008
    #9
  10. Adrienne Boswell

    Neredbojias Guest

    On 29 Mar 2008, Ed Mullen <> wrote:

    > I kinda like it staying light later. It was especially fun for me
    > when I spent 2 1/2 weeks in Ireland in June and it stayed light until
    > almost 10 PM. Same thing on an Alaska cruise. I think we should just
    > adjust the clock ahead an hour for 12 months of the year! :-D


    Btw, check out my new email address. I couldn't get it to "go through"
    without sticking the "me@" in front, but the link seems to work.

    --
    Neredbojias
    http://www.neredbojias.com/
    Great sights and sounds
    Neredbojias, Mar 30, 2008
    #10
  11. Adrienne Boswell

    Neredbojias Guest

    On 30 Mar 2008, lid (Johan W. Elzenga) wrote:

    >> > I say it's time to get rid of DST altogether.

    >>
    >> I couldn't agree more. Fortunately, I, like Eric, live in a state
    >> which has no daylight savings time, but before I moved, I hated it,
    >> too. I think the point is that if they want to adjust work and
    >> school start times, etc., go ahead, but leave the clock itself alone.

    >
    > Funny. Do you really think that leaving the clock alone, but changing
    > the starting time of everything you do makes any difference
    > whatsoever?


    Absolutely! I means not having to screw with the clock and clock-type
    mechanisms such as computer time.

    > It still means you have to get up one hour earlier.


    Sure, either way. Whether a person likes that or not is varying but why
    make people change their clocks - just to aggravate them more?

    > I like DST. We have one more hour of daylight in the evening, so it
    > really makes me feel that summer is on its way.


    Move to Tortuga; it's summer there all the time.

    --
    Neredbojias
    http://www.neredbojias.com/
    Great sights and sounds
    Neredbojias, Mar 30, 2008
    #11
  12. Neredbojias <me@http://www.neredbojias.com/_eml/fliam.php> wrote:

    > > Funny. Do you really think that leaving the clock alone, but changing
    > > the starting time of everything you do makes any difference
    > > whatsoever?

    >
    > Absolutely! I means not having to screw with the clock and clock-type
    > mechanisms such as computer time.


    My computer sets the change automatically.


    > > It still means you have to get up one hour earlier.

    >
    > Sure, either way. Whether a person likes that or not is varying but why
    > make people change their clocks - just to aggravate them more?


    Probably because it's a lot easier to only change the clock, than to
    change every time table and every schedule. I'm sure people would find
    that much more impractical and would miss regular meetings, planes,
    trains and busses before they finally got used to the new schadules. But
    hey, I didn't invent DST, so don't ask me why it was done this way and
    not another way.

    > > I like DST. We have one more hour of daylight in the evening, so it
    > > really makes me feel that summer is on its way.

    >
    > Move to Tortuga; it's summer there all the time.


    I didn't say I want it to be summer all the time.



    --
    Johan W. Elzenga johan<<at>>johanfoto.nl
    Editor / Photographer http://www.johanfoto.com
    Johan W. Elzenga, Mar 30, 2008
    #12
  13. Adrienne Boswell

    J.O. Aho Guest

    Neredbojias wrote:
    > On 29 Mar 2008, Ed Mullen <> wrote:
    >
    >> I kinda like it staying light later. It was especially fun for me
    >> when I spent 2 1/2 weeks in Ireland in June and it stayed light until
    >> almost 10 PM. Same thing on an Alaska cruise. I think we should just
    >> adjust the clock ahead an hour for 12 months of the year! :-D

    >
    > Btw, check out my new email address. I couldn't get it to "go through"
    > without sticking the "me@" in front, but the link seems to work.


    Could it be that it's not an e-mail address.


    --

    //Aho
    J.O. Aho, Mar 30, 2008
    #13
  14. Adrienne Boswell

    J.O. Aho Guest

    Johan W. Elzenga wrote:
    > Neredbojias <> wrote:
    >
    >> On 29 Mar 2008, Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I hate daylight saving time. It's a waste of time. The sun isn't going
    >>> to do anything different just because we want it to, and Bessy the cow
    >>> isn't going to give milk any sooner, just because Old McDonald's buyers
    >>> are the the farm an hour earlier. Traffic accidents spike at the
    >>> beginning of DST, because our internal clocks don't give a hoot what the
    >>> clock says either - we're losing an hour of sleep.
    >>>
    >>> I say it's time to get rid of DST altogether.

    >>
    >> I couldn't agree more. Fortunately, I, like Eric, live in a state which
    >> has no daylight savings time, but before I moved, I hated it, too. I think
    >> the point is that if they want to adjust work and school start times, etc.,
    >> go ahead, but leave the clock itself alone.

    >
    > Funny. Do you really think that leaving the clock alone, but changing
    > the starting time of everything you do makes any difference whatsoever?
    > It still means you have to get up one hour earlier.
    >
    > I like DST. We have one more hour of daylight in the evening, so it
    > really makes me feel that summer is on its way.


    I hate the thought of change the clock twice a year, if people wants one
    more hour of daylight in the evening, then just see to that the
    state/country switches timezone one step to the right, for example most
    of Europe would just change from CET to EET and the problem is solved
    and no need to switch the clock, whats the point to change the time for
    a couple of months when the standard time is used, DST is used the
    majority of the year.


    --

    //Aho
    J.O. Aho, Mar 30, 2008
    #14
  15. Adrienne Boswell

    Tom Stiller Guest

    In article <Xns9A70D0408CAA8arbpenyahoocom@69.28.186.121>,
    Adrienne Boswell <> wrote:

    > Gazing into my crystal ball I observed dorayme
    > <> writing in news:doraymeRidThis-
    > :
    >
    > > In NSW Australia, daylight saving does not finish until 6th April (a
    > > week later than usual). I noticed my computer clock was put back an

    > hour
    > > today. It is supposed to be done automatically on a per region basis
    > > (set in sys pref on a Mac). Something or someone has stuffed up. Had

    > to
    > > manually put it forward again. It is possible, I suppose, it is just

    > my
    > > machine at fault (not me, of course.)
    > >

    >
    > I hate daylight saving time. It's a waste of time. The sun isn't going
    > to do anything different just because we want it to, and Bessy the cow
    > isn't going to give milk any sooner, just because Old McDonald's buyers
    > are the the farm an hour earlier. Traffic accidents spike at the
    > beginning of DST, because our internal clocks don't give a hoot what the
    > clock says either - we're losing an hour of sleep.
    >
    > I say it's time to get rid of DST altogether.


    Until recently the state of Indiana (US) allowed counties to set their
    own rule regarding DST. Comparing actual energy usage before and after
    the state legislature forced everyone to DST and allowing for yearly
    temperature variations, using neighboring counties as controls, showed
    an increase in energy usage. See
    <http://gizmodo.com/365527/daylight-saving-time-jump-may-actually-waste-e
    nergy> for more details.

    --
    Tom Stiller

    PGP fingerprint = 5108 DDB2 9761 EDE5 E7E3 7BDA 71ED 6496 99C0 C7CF
    Tom Stiller, Mar 30, 2008
    #15
  16. dorayme wrote:
    > In NSW Australia, daylight saving does not finish until 6th April (a
    > week later than usual). I noticed my computer clock was put back an hour
    > today. It is supposed to be done automatically on a per region basis
    > (set in sys pref on a Mac). Something or someone has stuffed up. Had to
    > manually put it forward again. It is possible, I suppose, it is just my
    > machine at fault (not me, of course.)
    >

    Why hasn't Jukka joined the thread, to scream that this belongs in
    comp.systems.clocks? (Hmm, he didn't even complain that the Easter egg
    thread belonged in rec.food.chocolate.)
    Harlan Messinger, Mar 30, 2008
    #16
  17. J.O. Aho <> wrote:

    > I hate the thought of change the clock twice a year, if people wants one
    > more hour of daylight in the evening, then just see to that the
    > state/country switches timezone one step to the right, for example most
    > of Europe would just change from CET to EET and the problem is solved
    > and no need to switch the clock, whats the point to change the time for
    > a couple of months when the standard time is used, DST is used the
    > majority of the year.


    DST is not about having one more hour of daylight in the evening. It's
    about having one more hour of daylight during the period that people are
    active. In summer, you waste daylight hours in the morning. That is why
    it makes sense to change that by changing the clock (or your habits).

    In winter, it's still dark when you get up in the morning. Using DST (or
    using another time zone permanently) in winter would mean one more hour
    of darkness in the morning. That is when people are drving to work and
    are at work, so having daylight in the morning is more important than
    having an extra hour of daylight in the evening.

    That is why DST is only used part of the year. DST only works in summer,
    because it gives you an extra hour in the evening *without* stealing it
    from the morning. If it worked all year round, we would have changed
    time zone ages ago. Or easier, we would have different habits and work
    from eight to four or from seven to three rather than from nine to five.


    --
    Johan W. Elzenga johan<<at>>johanfoto.nl
    Editor / Photographer http://www.johanfoto.com
    Johan W. Elzenga, Mar 30, 2008
    #17
  18. Adrienne Boswell

    Warren Oates Guest

    In article <1iem555.1sefj0rj6ho9hN%>,
    lid (Johan W. Elzenga) wrote:

    > Probably because it's a lot easier to only change the clock, than to
    > change every time table and every schedule. I'm sure people would find
    > that much more impractical and would miss regular meetings, planes,
    > trains and busses before they finally got used to the new schadules. But
    > hey, I didn't invent DST, so don't ask me why it was done this way and
    > not another way.


    Years ago, the Canadian railways refused to change their schedules to
    accommodate DST, so if you were taking the train you had to figure it
    all out an hour earlier (and this was in the days when their were two
    railways and you actually _could_ take a train to most places in
    Canada). It caused all sorts of problems; you'd walk into a railway
    station and time seemed to move backwards. Nowadays they (the railways)
    change with the Americans like everyone else except in that little town
    in Saskatchewan where the mayor still pokes a stick into a cow patty at
    noon every day to measure the angle of the sun.
    --
    W. Oates
    Warren Oates, Mar 30, 2008
    #18
  19. Adrienne Boswell

    Warren Oates Guest

    In article <>,
    Phil Kempster <> wrote:

    > Couldn't agree more. If you want to trade with an adjoining time zone,
    > get up an hour earlier [1]. You don't have to bother the cows and the
    > school children at all, let the rest of us stay in tune with the sun.
    > It's crazy that we're totally controlled by little mechanical devices
    > strapped to our wrists.
    >
    > [1] I live in a half hour time zone, like Newfoundland!


    Venezuela?
    --
    W. Oates
    Warren Oates, Mar 30, 2008
    #19
  20. Adrienne Boswell

    Baho Utot Guest

    On Sun, 30 Mar 2008 14:19:11 +0200, Johan W. Elzenga wrote:

    > J.O. Aho <> wrote:
    >
    >> I hate the thought of change the clock twice a year, if people wants
    >> one more hour of daylight in the evening, then just see to that the
    >> state/country switches timezone one step to the right, for example most
    >> of Europe would just change from CET to EET and the problem is solved
    >> and no need to switch the clock, whats the point to change the time for
    >> a couple of months when the standard time is used, DST is used the
    >> majority of the year.

    >
    > DST is not about having one more hour of daylight in the evening. It's
    > about having one more hour of daylight during the period that people are
    > active. In summer, you waste daylight hours in the morning. That is why
    > it makes sense to change that by changing the clock (or your habits).
    >
    > In winter, it's still dark when you get up in the morning. Using DST (or
    > using another time zone permanently) in winter would mean one more hour
    > of darkness in the morning. That is when people are drving to work and
    > are at work, so having daylight in the morning is more important than
    > having an extra hour of daylight in the evening.
    >
    > That is why DST is only used part of the year. DST only works in summer,
    > because it gives you an extra hour in the evening *without* stealing it
    > from the morning. If it worked all year round, we would have changed
    > time zone ages ago. Or easier, we would have different habits and work
    > from eight to four or from seven to three rather than from nine to five.


    This thread is amazing as the folks that _think_ they can get an extra
    hour of sunlite. The Earth revolves at a somewhat fixed pace so the
    reality of this is you don't get an extra hour. All days have approx. 24
    hours and that is all you get no matter how you want to count it.

    --
    Tayo'y Mga Pinoy
    Baho Utot, Mar 30, 2008
    #20
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