Displaying special IPA letters on html page

Discussion in 'HTML' started by Fulio Open, May 3, 2009.

  1. Fulio Open

    Fulio Open Guest

    Fulio Open, May 3, 2009
    #1
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  2. Fulio Open

    dorayme Guest

    dorayme, May 3, 2009
    #2
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  3. Fulio Open

    dorayme Guest

    dorayme, May 4, 2009
    #3
  4. Fulio Open

    Nik Coughlin Guest

    Nik Coughlin, May 4, 2009
    #4
  5. Fulio Open

    Fulio Pen Guest

    Fulio Pen, May 4, 2009
    #5
  6. Fulio Open

    Fulio Pen Guest

    On May 3, 7:05 pm, dorayme <> wrote:
    > In article <>,
    >
    >  dorayme <> wrote:
    > > In article
    > > <>,
    > >  Fulio Open <> wrote:

    >
    > > >http://www.pinyinology.com/listing/ipa_letters.html

    >
    > > U+1E5B and U+1E5A for small and capital:

    >
    > > &#x1e5b  &#x1e5a

    >
    > oops,
    >
    > ṛ  Ṛ
    >
    > --
    > dorayme


    Thanks a million for your help.

    fulio
    Fulio Pen, May 4, 2009
    #6
  7. Fulio Open wrote:

    > I wanted to present the letters 'r' and 'z' with a dot under them.
    > Please open the following page to see what they look like. I hope I
    > can do it with the unicode.
    >
    > http://www.pinyinology.com/listing/ipa_letters.html


    The image indeed seems to contain 'r' and 'z' with a dot under, but this is
    odd, if the notation is supposed to be IPA. As currently defined, IPA does
    not use dot under.

    Although the Unicode standard refers to the use of dot under as IPA usage,
    this actually refers to obsolete versions of IPA. Moreover, the old IPA
    usage is, as the Unicode standard says, to indicate "closer variety of
    vowel". On the other hand, the standard also says: "Americanist and
    Indo-Europeanist: retraction or retroflexion".

    It is thus unclear what the notation is supposed to mean and what the
    notational system is, but anyway it isn't modern IPA. If you are about to
    represent some old text in HTML format, then you might decide to use the
    same characters as the old text uses, even if it is outdated notation. In
    that case, the advice given by others is sufficient (though you could also
    write the characters as such, using the tools of the editor you're using -
    there should be no necessity of using character references for them when
    your encoding is UTF-8, as it is). But this really depends on your goals.

    My guess is that in your text, r with dot below is supposed to denote a
    syllabic (post)alveolar approximant, roughly the same as the sound between
    "p" and "t" in Standard American pronunciation of the word "particular". In
    IPA, the symbol for it is U+0279 U+0329, i.e. LATIN SMALL LETTER TURNED R
    followed by COMBINING VERTICAL LINE BELOW. (There is no single code point
    representation for this, i.e. it does not exist as a precomposed character.)
    Thus, it could be written in HTML as
    ɹ̩

    I have no idea of what z with dot below might refer to here.

    --
    Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
    Jukka K. Korpela, May 4, 2009
    #7
  8. Fulio Open

    Fulio Pen Guest

    On May 4, 2:32 pm, "Jukka K. Korpela" <> wrote:
    > Fulio Open wrote:
    > > I wanted to present the letters 'r' and 'z' with a dot under them.
    > > Please open the following page to see what they look like.  I hope I
    > > can do it with the unicode.

    >
    > >http://www.pinyinology.com/listing/ipa_letters.html

    >
    > The image indeed seems to contain 'r' and 'z' with a dot under, but this is
    > odd, if the notation is supposed to be IPA. As currently defined, IPA does
    > not use dot under.
    >
    > Although the Unicode standard refers to the use of dot under as IPA usage,
    > this actually refers to obsolete versions of IPA. Moreover, the old IPA
    > usage is, as the Unicode standard says, to indicate "closer variety of
    > vowel". On the other hand, the standard also says: "Americanist and
    > Indo-Europeanist: retraction or retroflexion".
    >
    > It is thus unclear what the notation is supposed to mean and what the
    > notational system is, but anyway it isn't modern IPA. If you are about to
    > represent some old text in HTML format, then you might decide to use the
    > same characters as the old text uses, even if it is outdated notation. In
    > that case, the advice given by others is sufficient (though you could also
    > write the characters as such, using the tools of the editor you're using -
    > there should be no necessity of using character references for them when
    > your encoding is UTF-8, as it is). But this really depends on your goals.
    >
    > My guess is that in your text, r with dot below is supposed to denote a
    > syllabic (post)alveolar approximant, roughly the same as the sound between
    > "p" and "t" in Standard American pronunciation of the word "particular". In
    > IPA, the symbol for it is U+0279 U+0329, i.e. LATIN SMALL LETTER TURNED R
    > followed by COMBINING VERTICAL LINE BELOW. (There is no single code point
    > representation for this, i.e. it does not exist as a precomposed character.)
    > Thus, it could be written in HTML as
    > ɹ̩
    >
    > I have no idea of what z with dot below might refer to here.
    >
    > --
    > Yucca,http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/


    Thanks a lot for the discussion.

    fulio
    Fulio Pen, May 8, 2009
    #8
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