Some free utilities for Java, with Hebrew support.

Discussion in 'Java' started by Mr. X., Sep 8, 2007.

  1. Mr. X.

    Mr. X. Guest

    Hello,
    I am looking for some free utilities for Java, that supports other languages
    then English
    (I need utilities that support Hebrew).

    1. Database (Is My-Sql good enough).
    2. Report maker.
    3. Code for reveal the result of formulas (should not be recrousive, but by
    stack).

    Thanks :)
    Mr. X., Sep 8, 2007
    #1
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  2. Mr. X.

    Mr. X. Guest

    ....
    Also 4. Verison control (Like source safe).
    The free utilities should be multi-platform
    (so I can run them on linux nor windows).

    Thanks :)
    Mr. X., Sep 8, 2007
    #2
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  3. Mr. X.

    Luke Yan Guest

    ÔÚ Sat, 8 Sep 2007 19:31:09 +0300 ʱ, "Mr. X."
    <no_spam_please@nospam_please.com> дÁË:
    --

    >Hello,
    >I am looking for some free utilities for Java, that supports other languages
    >then English
    >(I need utilities that support Hebrew).
    >

    1. Database (Is My-Sql good enough).
    it is enough

    2. Report maker.
    JasperReports, http://www.jaspersoft.com/

    >3. Code for reveal the result of formulas (should not be recrousive, but by
    >stack).
    >
    >Thanks :)
    >



    /**
    /* Java Is Not Platform-independent.It Is The Platform!
    */
    Luke Yan, Sep 9, 2007
    #3
  4. Mr. X.

    David Segall Guest

    "Mr. X." <no_spam_please@nospam_please.com> wrote:

    >Hello,
    >I am looking for some free utilities for Java, that supports other languages
    >then English
    >(I need utilities that support Hebrew).
    >
    >1. Database (Is My-Sql good enough).

    I have a list of free, full featured, databases at
    <http://users.bigpond.net.au/DavidSegall/ee_freedbms.html>. Of this
    list MySQL is the only one that may not be free. I'm sure IBM and
    Oracle support Hebrew but I don't know about the rest.
    David Segall, Sep 9, 2007
    #4
  5. Mr. X.

    Guest

    On Sep 9, 2:58 am, David Segall <> wrote:
    > I have a list of free, full featured, databases at
    > <http://users.bigpond.net.au/DavidSegall/ee_freedbms.html>. Of this
    > list MySQL is the only one that may not be free.


    Eh? I thought we recently had a thread here about MySQL being GPL when
    parts of it ought to be LGPL. It doesn't get more free as in Free
    Software Foundation than GPL. :p
    , Sep 9, 2007
    #5
  6. wrote:
    > On Sep 9, 2:58 am, David Segall <> wrote:
    >> I have a list of free, full featured, databases at
    >> <http://users.bigpond.net.au/DavidSegall/ee_freedbms.html>. Of this
    >> list MySQL is the only one that may not be free.

    >
    > Eh? I thought we recently had a thread here about MySQL being GPL when
    > parts of it ought to be LGPL. It doesn't get more free as in Free
    > Software Foundation than GPL. :p


    MySQL is definitely "free software" but that is not "free for everyone".

    Arne
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, Sep 10, 2007
    #6
  7. Mr. X.

    Guest

    On Sep 9, 9:06 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    > MySQL is definitely "free software" but that is not "free for everyone".


    ???
    , Sep 11, 2007
    #7
  8. Mr. X.

    Lew Guest

    wrote:
    > On Sep 9, 9:06 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    >> MySQL is definitely "free software" but that is not "free for everyone".

    >
    > ???


    In other words, they make some people pay for it.

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Sep 11, 2007
    #8
  9. wrote:
    > On Sep 9, 9:06 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    >> MySQL is definitely "free software" but that is not "free for everyone".

    >
    > ???


    It is not free for those that want to distribute it embedded
    in their non free solution.

    Arne
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, Sep 15, 2007
    #9
  10. Mr. X.

    Guest

    On Sep 11, 12:59 am, Lew <> wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > On Sep 9, 9:06 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    > >> MySQL is definitely "free software" but that is not "free for everyone".

    >
    > > ???

    >
    > In other words, they make some people pay for it.


    It's GPL. Anyone can use it without paying, so long as they adhere to
    the terms of the GPL and open source any derivative works.

    For instance I can legally run a for-profit web site using a MySQL
    DBMS at the back end and not pay; assuming the site doesn't distribute
    binary-only modified copies of MySQL stuff at least. If it, say, sells
    T-shirts with clever slogans like ThinkGeek or suchlike, it doesn't
    run afoul of the GPL and it certainly doesn't require paying money to
    legally use MySQL at the back end.

    I don't see how your statement can be true other than in the narrow
    case where the "some people" wish to make and distribute a closed-
    source database system derived from MySQL, or at least something
    closed-source that uses MySQL code. They'd have to either open source
    whatever used the MySQL code or negotiate an exemption from MySQL's
    copyright's holder. The latter might result in being granted
    permission in exchange for a fee. But how common is that going to be
    in practise?
    , Sep 15, 2007
    #10
  11. Mr. X.

    Lew Guest

    wrote:
    > They'd have to ... negotiate an exemption from MySQL's
    > copyright's holder. The latter might result in being granted
    > permission in exchange for a fee. But how common is that going to be
    > in practise?


    Quite common. It's a major source of MySQL's revenue, AFAIK.

    They are quite open about their dual-licensing policy.

    --
    Lew
    Lew, Sep 15, 2007
    #11
  12. Arne Vajhøj <> writes:

    > wrote:
    >> On Sep 9, 9:06 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    >>> MySQL is definitely "free software" but that is not "free for everyone".

    >> ???

    >
    > It is not free for those that want to distribute it embedded
    > in their non free solution.


    It's still "free software", with the meaning that term has been given
    by the Free Software Foundation in The Free Software Definition.

    "Free software" never meant "free to do whatever you want", just as it
    doesn't mean "gratis" (another likely interpretation of the term "free
    software" without prior knowledge of the definition).
    <URL:http://www.fsf.org/licensing/essays/free-sw.html>

    /L
    --
    Lasse Reichstein Nielsen -
    DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleDOM.html>
    'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
    Lasse Reichstein Nielsen, Sep 15, 2007
    #12
  13. wrote:
    > I don't see how your statement can be true other than in the narrow
    > case where the "some people" wish to make and distribute a closed-
    > source database system derived from MySQL, or at least something
    > closed-source that uses MySQL code. They'd have to either open source
    > whatever used the MySQL code or negotiate an exemption from MySQL's
    > copyright's holder. The latter might result in being granted
    > permission in exchange for a fee. But how common is that going to be
    > in practise?


    Very common.

    That is how the majority of the software industry works.

    Some pay. Other uses another open source database with a
    non GPL license.

    Arne
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, Sep 15, 2007
    #13
  14. Lasse Reichstein Nielsen wrote:
    > Arne Vajhøj <> writes:
    >> wrote:
    >>> On Sep 9, 9:06 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    >>>> MySQL is definitely "free software" but that is not "free for everyone".
    >>> ???

    >> It is not free for those that want to distribute it embedded
    >> in their non free solution.

    >
    > It's still "free software", with the meaning that term has been given
    > by the Free Software Foundation in The Free Software Definition.


    True.

    Which I believe is what I wrote a week ago (>>>>).

    Arne
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, Sep 15, 2007
    #14
  15. Mr. X.

    Guest

    On Sep 15, 2:15 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > I don't see how your statement can be true other than in the narrow
    > > case where the "some people" wish to make and distribute a closed-
    > > source database system derived from MySQL, or at least something
    > > closed-source that uses MySQL code. They'd have to either open source
    > > whatever used the MySQL code or negotiate an exemption from MySQL's
    > > copyright's holder. The latter might result in being granted
    > > permission in exchange for a fee. But how common is that going to be
    > > in practise?

    >
    > Very common.


    Eh. This doesn't make sense. Making and distributing a proprietary
    DBMS derived from MySQL, and having to pay MySQL for the privilege,
    and then charge at least as much to your own customers? Won't those
    customers just download and use MySQL instead? Only if you're adding a
    big useful added feature or something that MySQL lacks, in which case
    MySQL in allowing the closed-sourcing of such for money instead of
    insisting all such improvements be folded back into the community is
    violating the spirit of free software!

    Or are you referring to how they "cleverly" GPL'd instead of LGPL'd a
    client library so apps that use it to connect to a database will have
    to be open sourced or pay? The obvious thing to do then is to use
    another SQL client library, and perhaps still use MySQL server-side.

    In short, it doesn't seem like much of a business model for MySQL. A
    closed source derivative of the MySQL DBMS that costs money is likely
    to be outcompeted by vanilla MySQL. Use without redistribution is
    free. And the client library surely has lots of alternatives that can
    be used in a closed-source client program.
    , Sep 17, 2007
    #15
  16. wrote:
    > Or are you referring to how they "cleverly" GPL'd instead of LGPL'd a
    > client library so apps that use it to connect to a database will have
    > to be open sourced or pay?


    Yes.

    > The obvious thing to do then is to use
    > another SQL client library, and perhaps still use MySQL server-side.


    Do you know any ?

    > In short, it doesn't seem like much of a business model for MySQL. A
    > closed source derivative of the MySQL DBMS that costs money is likely
    > to be outcompeted by vanilla MySQL.


    I don't even know if the commercial license allows modifications.

    > Use without redistribution is
    > free. And the client library surely has lots of alternatives that can
    > be used in a closed-source client program.


    Links please.

    Arne
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, Sep 22, 2007
    #16
  17. Mr. X.

    Guest

    On Sep 21, 8:13 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    > > The obvious thing to do then is to use
    > > another SQL client library, and perhaps still use MySQL server-side.

    >
    > Do you know any ?


    Not personally, no, but they're out there.

    > > free. And the client library surely has lots of alternatives that can
    > > be used in a closed-source client program.

    >
    > Links please.


    If you want links you go and google it. It's not my job to find you
    the libraries you want with the licensing terms you want. But it's
    surely not going to be difficult; SQL is a standard so a variety of
    client libraries for that standard should be fairly easy to find, same
    as for FTP, HTTP, and suchlike. Java itself has a basic HTTP client
    library come *standard*, and there's a bunch of database stuff in JEE
    libraries that probably includes client-side SQL.

    Of course Sun's Java license, I'm fairly sure, allows distributing
    proprietary Java software without paying Sun (or anyone else).

    Of course, if the MySQL server butchers the standard this might not
    work with the MySQL server but in that case what you want is a *real*
    SQL server instead of something that claims to be, but really isn't.
    , Sep 22, 2007
    #17
  18. On Sep 22, 12:15 am, wrote:
    > On Sep 21, 8:13 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    >
    > > > The obvious thing to do then is to use
    > > > another SQL client library, and perhaps still use MySQL server-side.

    >
    > > Do you know any ?

    >
    > Not personally, no, but they're out there.
    >
    > > > free. And the client library surely has lots of alternatives that can
    > > > be used in a closed-source client program.

    >
    > > Links please.

    >
    > If you want links you go and google it.


    Surely if you're confident saying that the MySQL client library surely
    has alternatives, you must have an example, no? Personally I find the
    assertion somewhat surprising, since there is no market nor "itch" for
    a third-party MySQL client library that I know of.

    > SQL is a standard so a variety of client libraries for that standard should
    > be fairly easy to find


    While SQL the language is indeed a standard, there is no standard for
    wire represntations of either queries or result sets -- the mechanism
    by which SQL queries are actually performed is left entirely to the
    implementation. SQL doesn't even mandate that there be a wire-level
    representation: there are several databases that run entirely in the
    client process's address space, and queries are parsed and turned into
    function calls, not byte streams.

    > Of course, if the MySQL server butchers the standard


    Heh.

    Cheers,
    Owen
    Owen Jacobson, Sep 23, 2007
    #18
  19. wrote:
    > On Sep 21, 8:13 pm, Arne Vajhøj <> wrote:
    >>> The obvious thing to do then is to use
    >>> another SQL client library, and perhaps still use MySQL server-side.

    >> Do you know any ?

    >
    > Not personally, no, but they're out there.


    How can you know they are out there if you don't know one personal ?

    >>> free. And the client library surely has lots of alternatives that can
    >>> be used in a closed-source client program.

    >> Links please.

    >
    > If you want links you go and google it. It's not my job to find you
    > the libraries you want with the licensing terms you want.


    Why should I google to find supporting evidence of your claims ????

    > But it's
    > surely not going to be difficult; SQL is a standard so a variety of
    > client libraries for that standard should be fairly easy to find,


    I think you have misunderstood how database communication works.

    SQL is the text you put into the JDBC driver. It is not a description of
    the request and response send between the JDBC driver and the database
    (even though the requests probably has the SQL as payload).

    > same
    > as for FTP, HTTP, and suchlike.


    Those protocols are standardized. There are no standard for the wire
    format used by databases.

    Arne
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Arne_Vajh=F8j?=, Sep 23, 2007
    #19
  20. Mr. X.

    Guest

    On Sep 22, 10:09 pm, Owen Jacobson <> wrote:
    > Surely if you're confident saying that the MySQL client library surely
    > has alternatives, you must have an example, no? Personally I find the
    > assertion somewhat surprising, since there is no market nor "itch" for
    > a third-party MySQL client library that I know of.


    What you're saying doesn't make sense. There are a ton of independent,
    third-party libraries for every *other* common type of networking
    function, language, transport, protocol, or what-have-you. And there's
    market forces to consider. Clearly there's demand for a client library
    license-compatible with closed-source development. The marginal cost
    of such a thing is obviously zero. The price MySQL charges for such a
    library is considerably greater. SQL itself is not proprietary; not
    patented/secret/whatever. Ergo, someone will and probably someone has
    undercut MySQL's price for this particular good. That I don't know of
    a specific example is immaterial; it is easy to demonstrate its
    probable existence by simple reasoning.

    The same reasoning that says that if mints cost 10 cents to make and
    some store is selling brand-name ones for a buck a pop, and nothing in
    the nature of a "mint" is secret or patented or anything, then
    somewhere you will likely find someone selling mints for fifty cents,
    or a quarter, or even just fifteen cents. (I'd look to see if the very
    same store carried no-name mints at half the price, before even
    looking in other stores.)

    > While SQL the language is indeed a standard, there is no standard for
    > wire represntations of either queries or result sets


    That's very odd. If there isn't, there certainly should be. That's as
    if they'd standardized HTML without bothering to standardize HTTP.

    Nevertheless, whatever protocol MySQL server uses is surely easy to
    reverse engineer without "infecting" whatever you're developing with
    the GPL, using the standard clean-room reverse engineering method used
    to avoid copyright infringement when developing interoperable software
    more generally.
    , Sep 23, 2007
    #20
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