asp.net recycled


G

Guest

I am getting the dreaded:

aspnet_wp.exe (PID: 3892) was recycled because memory consumption exceeded
the 1228 MB (60 percent of available RAM).

(asp.net 2.0 on windows 2003 server)

Believing this is a memory leak (or a memory retention issue) I am looking
carefully at the process to determine what's causing the problem.

But I am a litle stuck and would appreciate some help:

I have been monitoring several performance counters in order to clue me in
to what is happening:

For example, the process, at the moment, shows a VM Size (task mgr) of
330,000K which roughly cooresponds to the process/private bytes counter.
However, the .NET Clr Memory counter '# Bytes in all Heaps' shows 46758028
bytes or 45,662K. I believe the ratio of these two maintains until the I
reach the recycle point (through i will verify that over the next several
hours).

Some questions:

Does that ratio suggest that non-managed memory (something in COM) is my
problem? Or is this simply a matter of the .net memory allocator allocating
new blocks and growing the VM Size (until it reached 60%)? If the latter,
then what causes the VM Size decrease?

btw, regarding non-managed memory, I don't do any explicit interop calls but
do make heavy use of the database, as well as, xmldocument.
 
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M

Michael Nemtsev

Hello pb,

Examine this Tess' post http://blogs.msdn.com/tess/archive/2005/11/25/496899.aspx

---
WBR, Michael Nemtsev [.NET/C# MVP].
My blog: http://spaces.live.com/laflour
Team blog: http://devkids.blogspot.com/

"The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we
miss it, but that it is too low and we reach it" (c) Michelangelo

p> I am getting the dreaded:
p>
p> aspnet_wp.exe (PID: 3892) was recycled because memory consumption
p> exceeded the 1228 MB (60 percent of available RAM).
p>
p> (asp.net 2.0 on windows 2003 server)
p>
p> Believing this is a memory leak (or a memory retention issue) I am
p> looking carefully at the process to determine what's causing the
p> problem.
p>
p> But I am a litle stuck and would appreciate some help:
p>
p> I have been monitoring several performance counters in order to clue
p> me in to what is happening:
p>
p> For example, the process, at the moment, shows a VM Size (task mgr)
p> of 330,000K which roughly cooresponds to the process/private bytes
p> counter. However, the .NET Clr Memory counter '# Bytes in all Heaps'
p> shows 46758028 bytes or 45,662K. I believe the ratio of these two
p> maintains until the I reach the recycle point (through i will verify
p> that over the next several hours).
p>
p> Some questions:
p>
p> Does that ratio suggest that non-managed memory (something in COM) is
p> my problem? Or is this simply a matter of the .net memory allocator
p> allocating new blocks and growing the VM Size (until it reached 60%)?
p> If the latter, then what causes the VM Size decrease?
p>
p> btw, regarding non-managed memory, I don't do any explicit interop
p> calls but do make heavy use of the database, as well as, xmldocument.
p>
 
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W

Walter Wang [MSFT]

Hi,

To troubleshoot memory leak problem in ASP.NET, we first need to know which
objects are using the most of the memory, usually doing this effectively
will need to use WinDBG. For example:

#If broken it is, fix it you should : ASP.NET Memory Leak Case Study:
Sessions Sessions Sessions¡­
http://blogs.msdn.com/tess/archive/2006/02/02/523553.aspx


Please note our MSDN Managed Newsgroup support service doesn't support dump
analysis, though. Therefore I can only give some general suggestion on
where to look.

Regards,
Walter Wang ([email protected], remove 'online.')
Microsoft Online Community Support

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This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
 

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