Still confused why working set larger than virtual memory

Discussion in 'C++' started by George2, Jan 11, 2008.

  1. George2

    George2 Guest

    Hello everyone,


    Sorry that this question is related to another question I posted some
    time before because I have some new findings and self-analysis.

    My question is why sometimes from perfmon on Windows, working set
    larger than virtual memory? I think virtual memory is the total size
    of memory (committed, reserved, shared, private) and working set is
    just the RAM touched by current process currently. Virtual memory
    should always larger than working set...

    But, I write a simple program to show working set is larger than
    virtual memory from perfmon. The program is simple, just open a couple
    of memory map files and read from beginning to the end.

    The only reason I could think of why working set sometimes is larger
    than virtual memory is, the OS memory management component may not
    reclaim some RAM consumed by current process even if the current
    process does not use the RAM. And keeping such RAM could improve
    performance if the process will use it in the future. But this point
    makes me confused because I think if it is true, such RAM does not
    have related virtual memory address, how could the current process
    utilize or even address (re-use to avoid hard page fault) it in the
    future?


    thanks in advance,
    George
     
    George2, Jan 11, 2008
    #1
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  2. Please, before going any further, do some self-analysis on the matter
    of posting to the right newsgroup.
    V
     
    Victor Bazarov, Jan 11, 2008
    #2
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  3. For two days in a row you have posted more or less the same question,
    and for two days in a row you have been told that this is not the right
    group to ask in. If you still can not understand that this is not the
    right group to ask in I doubt that you can understand why your working
    set is larger than the virtual memory either.
     
    Erik Wikström, Jan 11, 2008
    #3
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